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Scottish History & Life


Preface

THE Historical Loan Collection in the Glasgow International Exhibition, 1901, provided materials for representing the history of the Scottish nation, by means of extant memorials and remains. Among these were many objects illustrative of the archaeology of Scotland, of the history of the country, and of the social life, organisation, experiences, employments, and recreations of the people in bygone times.

The prehistoric condition of the country was amply exemplified by stone and bronze implements, and by urns and other burial remains. Traces of the Roman occupation were also visible, and the introduction of Christianity into the country, as well as its spread over the land, was illustrated by reproductions of the Ruthwell Cross, and of many other sculptured stones which yet exist scattered throughout the kingdom. By illuminated missals, printed books, church furniture, papers and documents, the history of the Church was continued down to the convulsion of the Reformation Period, to the stormy and tragic era of the Covenant and Killing Times, and on to the great Disruption of 1843.

Civil history was equally well illustrated in its more salient and romantic features. Queen Mary and her slow tragedy were brought before the eyes of the people, as were also the experiences of her fateful grandson, Charles I., and his sorrowful end. The Revolution and its sequel, the Union, the Jacobite risings and their melancholy outcome of confiscation and execution, were also demonstrated by relics, portraits, and many other memorials.

Of the social condition of the people, their arms and armour, their dress and domestic implements, their frailties and failings, their superstitions and credulity, their spurts, games, and entertainments, the illustrations were numerous and full of significance.

In seeking local memorials which might throw light on the growth of a Scottish burgh, it was naturally under the circumstances easier to obtain a full series illustrative of the history of Glasgow than of any other Scottish town, although contributions of much significance and importance came from Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Dundee, Perth, and from other ancient Royal Burghs. Originally the seat of one of the most powerful ecclesiastical establishments, Glasgow was at an early date made a Royal Burgh under the ruling Bishops. Later, it became the seat of an important university, and, gradually waxing it attained the full status of a Royal Burgh. After the Union commercial prosperity came like a Hood, and with the opening up of coal fields and deposits of iron ore the era of industrial expansion of the city began. At no period of its history was Glasgow much mixed up with affairs of the State, but in all that concerns the prosperity of the country, and consequently the comfort and well-being of the people, it has been an important factor.

The purpose of this volume is to utilise this valuable material in telling the story of Scottish History, and showing what the people were who made it.

In a work covering so wide a field it was found advisable to invite the co-operation of a number of authors who had made special study of a particular period or subject. In a few cases, in order to secure continuity of narrative, it was necessary to refer to matters which had already been treated of in another section; but each author has his own point of view ior which he is responsible.

No effort has been spared to make this volume both a vivid and an accurate picture of Scottish History and Life, and grateful acknowledgment is made of much assistance received from many students who have been able to throw a fresh light on some doubtful point, or to give additional interest by finding some new illustration.

The publishers desire to express their very cordial thanks to the owners of the objects pictured in the following pages for permission to have them reproduced in this volume. The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, and other owners of blocks, kindly placed their stores at the disposal ol the publishers, but for the most part, the illustrations have been specially engraved for this work. This has involved the preparation of several hundred engravings which have been made under the superintendence of Mr. James Craig Annan.

Glasgow, October, 1902.

Illustrations

Of the four hundred and thirty-seven Illustrations in this volume two hundred and eighty-nine have been engraved specially for it from the portraits or objeCts in the Historical Loan Collections of the Glasgow International Exhibition, 1901, by T. & R. ANNAN SONS

Contents

LIST OF FULL-PAGE PLATES
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

History of Scotland

PREHISTORIC REMAINS. By Joseph Anderson, LL.D.,
SCULPTURED STONES OF SCOTLAND. By R. C. Graham of Skipness
EARLY SCOTTISH HISTORY. By Patrick Hay Aitken, B.D.
MEDIEVAL HISTORY. By Professor Dudley Julius Medley
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS. By D. Hay Fleming, LL.D.
JAMES THE SIXTH. By D. Hay Fleming, LL.D.
KING, KIRK, AND COVENANT. By D. Hay Fleming, LL.D.
BEFORE THE UNION. By Henry Grey Graham
THE UNION. By Henry Grey Graham
THE JACOBITE RISINGS. By Henry Grey Graham
AFTER THE REBELLION. By Henry Grey Graham

Aspects of Scottish Life

SCOTTISH BURGHS, GUILDS, AND INCORPORATIONS. By James Baton
SCOTTISH BURGHAL CHARTERS. By Robert Renwick
DEER STALKING, FISHING, AND FALCONRY. By Rr. Hon. Sir Herbert Maxwell, Bart.
ARCHERY, GOLF, AND CURLING. By John Kerr
SCOTTISH WEAPONS. By C. E. Whitelaw
OLD SCOTTISH PLATE. By Alexander J. S. Brook
RECORDS OF FREEMASONRY. By J. D. G. Dalrymple
EARLY LITERARY MANUSCRIPTS. By Georoe Neilson
SOME SCOTTISH ECCLESIASTICAL RELICS. By William George Black
ASPECTS OF SOCIAL LIFE IN SCOTLAND. By Henry Grey Graham
THE SCOTTISH UNIVERSITIES. By David Murray, LL.D.

Memorials of Glasgow

GLASGOW. By William Young, R.S.W.

INDEX

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