Check all the Clans that have DNA Projects. If your Clan is not in the list there's a way for it to be listed.
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The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library Family Tree
The Family Tree - Aug/Sep 2002
Seeking male volunteers  with the ELLISON or ALLISON surnames for a DNA study


A group of male Ellisons/Allisons have organized a Y-chromosome DNA project.  Fathers pass their Y-chromosomes, or "DNA fingerprints," down to their sons with little-if-any-variation, from generation to generation. Therefore, men  with identical, or near identical DNA fingerprints (some minor variation can occur), can be genetically proven to be descendants of a common male ancestor.

 I am the coordinator of the project. The first two participants were Allison males who had traced their ancestry back to Orange and Rockland counties in the American colony of New York during the 1600s and 1700s.  Our project has  grown to 14 participants and we are still adding more participants.   We have already received the results of eight  DNA tests from the lab and we're beginning to see a pattern developing.

Through the use of DNA analysis we've  recently  discovered that four seemingly different lines of Allisons who lived in New York in the 1600s and 1700s are actually all related and all are descendants of Lawrence Ellison.  He  was from England before he migrated to the American colonies after 1632.  Lawrence and his family and other families settled first in Massachusetts, then in Connecticut and finally in New York.  We learned that the four lines are related when the DNA  of four different men with the surnames of Allison and Ellison was  tested and  all  four of the men were informed by the DNA analysis company that they have matching DNA scores.  Prior to their DNA analyses, the men had not known each other but now they are working together trying to find the connections between their ancestors.

Three of our DNA project participants trace their Ellison/Allison ancestry back to Lanarkshire, Scotland in the 1600s.  Two live in the U. S. and one lives in New Zealand.  One man's DNA score has been received from the lab and we're waiting for the results of the other two men's DNA tests.   We want to find out if they have matching DNA scores.  If they do, they'll have  excellent evidence that they share a common ancestral line from Lanarkshire. 

Seeking male volunteers  with the ELLISON or ALLISON surnames for a DNA study to determine if the early ELLISON/ALLISON immigrants from Scotland to America in the 1600s and 1700s were related or if they decended from several different genetic lines of  British Allisons/Ellisons.  In order to discover which  Ellisons and Allisons share a common paternal Ellison/Allison ancestry, we need  living males with the Ellison or Allison surname  who descend from  the various Ellison/Allison colonial ancestors to become participants in our ELLISON/ALLISON surname Y-chromosome  DNA Project.  Fathers pass their Y-chromosomes, or "DNA fingerprints," down to their sons with little-if-any-variation, from generation to generation just as surnames are passed from father to son. Therefore, men  with identical, or near identical DNA fingerprints (some minor variation can occur), can be genetically proven to be descendants of a common male ancestor.

The cost per Y-chromosome DNA test is $99 for a study of 12 DNA markers and $169 for 25 DNA markers. All that is required is a swab of cells from the inside cheek, payment for the test, and a pedigree chart showing your paternal Ellison/Allison line of descent for  5 generations. For those of you facing brick walls with your ELLISON/ALLISON  ancestry, this is an opportunity to possibly find which
family you belong to or to rule out which ones you don't belong with.  Volunteers will be personally notified by the DNA testing company of the names and addresses (including e-mail) of other men who match their DNA scores, which will enable them to share genealogical research and work together to determine who their common ancestor was and where he came from originally.  For more information about how to become a participant in our ELLISON/ALLISON surname DNA Project, how to place an order for a DNA sample kit  and to ask other questions about the project, please contact me by e-mail (if you have e-mail) or by snail mail, if you don't.

Contact Mary Allison Yonan, Project Coordinator,  by e-mail at: yonan@fgi.net


Return to August/September 2002 Index

 


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