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The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library Family Tree
The Family Tree - August/September 2004
Find out about the Library in Moultrie


   It’s easy to learn about both The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library and also The Moultrie-Colquitt County Library.  Just visit http://colquitt.k12.ga.us/public_lib/library.htm

Beth to present program in Fort Myers, Florida

   The Family Tree editor-in-chief, Beth Gay, will present an all-day program at the Cape Coral Library.  There will be a session from 10 AM until noon and then another from 1 PM until 3 PM.

   If you would like complete information, please contact Bryan L. Mulcahy, Reference Librarian at the Fort Myers – Lee County Library.  You may email bmulcahy@leegov.com or you might wish to call 239-479-4651.

Ocala Games gone…

 The Scottish Society of North Central Florida announces that the Ocala Highland Games will not be held this year.  They have filed for Chapter 7 protection in bankruptcy court.

Dr. Quinn Pugh honored in Seattle, Washington by Dr. Kemp Mabry

   They came from all over the United States to the meeting in Seattle, Washington, where the highest award they had was presented posthumously to Dr. Quinn Pugh by The Baptist History and Heritage Society this past May 28.  His wife, Norma, and son, Ben accepted the plaque to a standing ovation.

   Dr. Pugh died Friday, the 13th of February, 2004 during heart surgery.  The Rev. Julian Ward of Statesboro said that Dr. Pugh’s passing “left a big hole in our hearts.”

   Dr. Pugh had endeared himself in myriad ways locally as a peerless preacher, choir member of Statesboro First Baptist Church and even as a breakfast cook for teenagers, and as a remarkable portrayal of Biblical and historical characters including Saint Patrick.

   The award had national and international significance: pastor in Louisiana, Georgia, New Jersey and Maryland, executive director of Metro New York Baptist Association and later the New York State Convention, he had served as president of Maryland Mission Board and president of Southern Baptist Association of Executive Directors. 

  Dr. Pugh served on The Heritage and Identity Commission of the Baptist World Alliance.  He was a world traveler – New Zealand, Spain, England, Brazil and other countries where Baptist World Alliance Commissions met.  He was a friend of Dr. Billy Kim of Seoul, Korea, five year president of Baptist World Alliance.

   In addition to being a published author, Dr. Pugh’s creative approach to history resulted in dozens of one-man portrayals of Biblical characters.  He portrayed numerous Baptist and other historical persons including Dr. George W. Truett, the Prince of Preachers of the 20th century.  When Dr. Pugh appeared as George Truett, it was eerie.  In makeup and period costume, he bore a remarkable resemblance to Dr. Truett whom I had seen and heard twice.

   Dr. Pugh had presented monologues at the Tennessee Baptist Convention, the Southern Baptist Convention, Baptist World Alliance Executive Committee and General Council at Furman University, Mercer University, Georgia Southern University and in numerous other settings.

   He had a fabulous memory.  During his presentations, the audience often felt he was the character being portrayed.

   He was always in period costume.  His wife, Norma, exercised her considerable talent as makeup artist.

   It is no wonder that the Rev. Dr. Reuben Quinn Pugh, Sr., was awarded the Distinguished Service Award at The Baptist History and Heritage Society meeting, presented by Dr. Charles Deweese, executive director of the society.

  Dr. Mabry’s personal note…

   At Bethel Baptist Church on the Westside, our associate pastor, the Rev. Victor Scott delivered a sermon recently on “How do you know when God is speaking to you?”  It was a penetrating message.

   On the way home from church, wife Evelyn said God had spoken to me through Dr. Pugh.  Indeed, we had been in communication almost every week for the past several years.

   He had sponsored my ordination as deacon at Bethel, bringing several of our deacon friends from First Baptist to the service at Bethel.  He had conducted a Deacon’s Workshop at Bethel.

   It seemed that he thought he “could make something out of me.”  I was his “agent,” arranging most of his 11 portrayals of Saint Patrick in this area.

   His passing did, indeed, leave a big hole in my heart.\

Here’s a free 660-page research guide…

 The Library Journal calls The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, by Val Greenwood, “the most comprehensive how-to book on American genealogical and local history research.”  It’s yours, free for the downloading!

  Go to http://genealogical.com/gpc_002.pdf

Do you have Anabaptist family?

   Geneticists like to study Anabaptists because they rarely marry out and they keep written genealogies.  Using a computerized database of 295,095 Amish and Mennonites, a study found that the frequency of cousin marriages increased over time.  People born between 1940 and 1959 married relatives 85 percent of the time – something to keep in mind when researching these groups.

Another cemetery idea!   This time it’s tinfoil…

   Philip Naff, writing in Ancestry Daily News has a suggestion for getting a tombstone  impression when the inscription is too worn to do a rubbing and an angled photograph won’t work.  He says to press a sheet of tinfoil into the inscription with a soft, dry sponge.  When the foil is removed, the resulting impression can be held up to a mirror for easy reading!

When the Courthouse burns down by Lois M. Cople

from the Larimer County Genealogical Society

   Back in 1885, the Oklahoma Genealogical Society had a program on the subject, When the Courthouse Burns Down. 

   The information is still relevant today.

  Suggestions include: The courthouse may not have burned totally.  Some records may have been saved because they were in annex or wing that didn’t burn. 

   There may have been two courthouses in the same county.  It happens.

   The records may have been reconstructed or re-recorded and remember that deeds are not recorded for years after the transfer sometimes.  It’s a good idea to also check with the county abstract offices.

   Check neighboring counties for deeds, probate records and marriages.  It may be necessary to go out a second or third county away for a marriage record.  People who elope do not go to their own town courthouse for the license.

   Check everything in the courthouse where the family went to and the county where they came from if the county is known.  Many sold land to relatives before moving on.

   Check the parent county/counties land records and state land records for those counties.  In the case of territory claimed by two states, check both state records.  If your problem is in the Fire Lands or a Military District, check the parent States records.

   Check the progeny (those that were formed from your county) county/counties for land records that may have been recorded at a much later date.

Veteran’s Administration offers online nationwide gravesite locator

   More than 3 million records showing where veterans have been buried in Department of Veteran’s Affairs (VA) national cemeteries are now available online.  This makes it easy for anyone with Internet access to search for the gravesite locations of deceased family and friends.

   This site contains records of veterans and dependents buried in the VA’s 120 cemeteries since the Civil War.  It has records of some burials in state veteran’s cemeteries and burials in Arlington National Cemetery from 1999 until now.

   Visit http://www.cem.va.gov to find the recods.

World War II Memorial sites you can use…

 Have you registered family members for the World War II Memorial?  The registry can be found at http://www.wwiimemorial.com or you may call 1-800-639-4992.  Other websites concerning the tribute are http://www.americasgreatestgeneration.com and the women’s memorial activities at http://www.womensmemorial.org


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