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The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library Family Tree
The Family Tree - August/September 2003
Wee Snippets (9)


Who chose Santa's color scheme?
Santa's red and white suit is based upon St. Nicholas, a minor saint from the fourth century with a reputation for generosity, kindness and performing miracles for children and sailors. Red and white were the colors of the traditional bishop's robes of that time, according to How Christmas Works: The Complete Guide to Christmas Traditions by Marshall Brain.
Why do we hang stockings on Christmas Eve?
Nicholas is said to have given gold coins to three poor girls who needed money for their wedding dowries, Brain writes. According to tradition, St. Nicholas left the coins in the girls' stockings, which they had hung by the fire to dry.
Thanks to The Stovall Journal, 6377 Limewood Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38134.

The pioneers discovered "alternate fuels!"
On the trail west, the pioneers discovered an "alternate fuel"...and that was the collection of buffalo chips for cooking.
As the wagon trains got on the plains, there was a shortage of wood to burn for the camp fires, so it was soon found that buffalo chips burned fiercely and cooked as well as wood. Buffalo chips were a by-product of buffalo excretement consisting of grass, masticated and digested and dried in the sun. Not unlike what we know as "cow pies." Women and children collected these chips as they walked along the trail to use in the camp fires. One pioneer stated that meat cooked over buffalo chips needed no pepper!
Source: Sequoia Genealogical Society Newsletter, Volume 30, Number 9, November 2003, Tulare City Library Genealogical Department, 113 North "F" Street, Tulare, California 93274-3803.

Daniel "Danny" R. Potter, 50, of Johnson City, Tennessee, died Saturday, November 1, 2003.
Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, Danny obtained his master's degree at East Tennessee State University. He worked at Greene Valley Developmental Center for 28 years.
He was the founder and coordinator of the Jonesborough Celtic Festival and the Sycamore Shoals Celtic Festival. He was a member of the Scottish American Military Society, Sons of Confederate Veterans, Society for Creative Anachronism, MENSA, membership secretary for Clan Colquhoun Society of North America, Tennessee State Educators Association, American Civil Liberties Union, National Arbor Day Foundation, National Eagle Scout Association, St. John Episcopal Church, 78th Frasier's Highlanders, St. Andrews Society, Clanna-n-Alba, Kingdom of Raknar, Bird Clan of the Free Cherokee of Eastern Alabama, and Celtic American Association of Northeast Tennessee.
He was preceded in death by grandparents Jim and Josie Potter, and Gordon and Ethel Pack. Survivors include his parents Ray and Mary Potter; brothers: Tim and wife Mona, Scot and wife Jozelle; sisters: Gerry Williams and husband Ray, Cathy Price and husband Bob; nephews: Jesse Potter, Jonathan Potter; and nieces: Nikki Potter, Lyndsay and Raysha Williams; and many very devoted and special friends.
Memorial services were held Sunday, November 9th at Millennium Convention Center, Johnson City, Tennessee, across from East Tennessee State University. Memorials may be made to the American Diabetes Association, WETS Radio Station or the Boy Scouts of America.

Ohio Scottish Games move to Lorain County Fairgrounds
Look for the 2004 Ohio Scottish Games at their new location, the Lorain County Fairgrounds, Wellington, Ohio. The fairgrounds are 8 miles south of Oberlin on Route 18, one mile west of Route 58. There is unlimited on-site parking and on-site campground with hook-ups. Walkways are paved and it is handicap accessible.
The event will be held Saturday, June 26, 2004 with the welcoming ceremonies and massed pipe bands, as well as all the special Scottish events. There will be food and entertainment, children's games, British cars and motorcycles displays, and a host of other great areas to visit. And of course, the Ceilidh after the games.
For ticket information, any questions, or to be on the 2004 OSG mailing list, call 440-835-9794 or e-mail
cgilchbvoh@aol.com

Plan to enjoy Burns Night Dinner in Akron
The Canton-Akron Scottish Heritage Association hosts their 7th annual Burns Night Dinner on Saturday, January 24, 2004. The event will be from 6:00 PM to 11:30 PM at the Martin University Center, 105 Fir Hill in Akron.
Enjoy an evening of Scottish entertainment featuring The Akron & District Pipe Band, the Tigh Na Creige Highland Dancers, and music for Scottish Country and ballroom dancing by the Gordon Shaffer Band and lots more.
For more information call Christie Walsh at 330-867-1030 in Akron or Bob Graham at 330-456-0867 in Canton. All reservations must be received by January 9, 2004.

The annual Scottish Symposium presented by The Caledonian Foundation USA, Inc., will focus on communication at the national and international level. The event will be held at the Holiday Inn/Lido Beach, Sarasota, Florida, February 20-22, 2004.
Guest of honor is Christopher Barron, Chief Executive, Scottish Ballet/Scottish Opera. Prior to assuming his present post, Barron was general manager of the Edinburgh International Festival and later became Associate Festival Director. He has also been associated with such other well-known festivals and opera houses as Glyndebourne, Wexford, Buxton and Brighton.
Addressing the need for improved communication at the international level, Bob Creighton will share his expertise as joint-founder and Chief Executive Officer North American of MentorShop, Inc., an international development company co-located in Scotland and the United States (Bethel, Connecticut). Creighton is a graduate of the University of Strathclyde and speaks regularly at American universities on international trade, investment, and cultural issues. He is an advisor to The Scottish Executive on a number of programs, including, currently, The First Minister's "Fresh Talent" initiative. Last year he was invited by the Minister for Industry and Lifelong Learning to be a founding member of the Global Scots Network.
The two-day conference will explore other issues also. An important one is the need to reach out to younger people to interest them in the Scottish heritage and the Scottish arts. Scott MacAulay, founding director of the College of Piping & Celtic Arts, Prince Edward Island, Canada, will discuss its principles, goals and study programs. The College is the only institution of its kind in North America. MacAulay is not only a gifted teacher, but has won numerous North American and Scottish solo piping competitions.
The panel discussions will be moderated by Professor Malcolm McLeod, FRSE, University of Glasgow, who is chairman of The Caledonian Foundation USA, and Scott Bushey, chairman of British Schools & Universities Foundation, which has headquarters in New York City. Bushey is a trustee of The Caledonian Foundation and chairman of its scholarship committee.
There will also be participation by members of The Scottish Coalition. Alan Bain, president of American-Scottish Foundation, Inc., will discuss a project recently proposed by The Coalition, that of building support for travel to Scotland, either on an individual basis or for tour groups. Moderator of this discussion will be Robert McWilliam, president emeritus of the Council of Scottish Clans and Associations, and president of The Caledonian Foundation.
Information on the Symposium is available from 1-800-713-0507.

Betcha didn't know this about "our" Royce McNeill
Did you know that McNeill was an Appalachian State football player during the 1950s ?
McNeill, along with football buddies, Jack Park, Fred Boger, Alvin Hooks and Dahl Bumgardner have remained close friends over the years. The group, now in their 70s, will have a meal at Elon University during December 2003 that they did not get when they played there 50 years ago.
The story goes that the Appalachian State football team was to have dinner in the Elon University dining hall after the game. But during the game, a fire broke out in dining hall, and everyone had to go back home hungry. However, on an upcoming Saturday, these long time friends plan on putting aside whatever else they're doing and meeting at Elon for the meal. It's is a promise kept by Elon president Leo Lambert.
And they will watch their hosts play Appalachian State from the grandstands instead of from the field.


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