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The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library Family Tree
The Family Tree - June/July 2005
World Record at Loch Norman!


Rural Hill Farm
Center of Scottish Heritage

4431 Neck Road, Huntersville, NC, 28078
www.ruralhillfarm.org

FOR RELEASE APRIL 22, 2005

Contact: Keets F. Taylor, Executive Director
lochnorman@ruralhillfarm.org
704-875-3113

LOCH NORMAN HIGHLAND GAMES
49 FEET 8 INCHES - NEW WORLD RECORD FOR ERIC FRASURE
IN THE 56 LB WEIGHT THROW FOR DISTANCE

”Yes it was ridiculous. Man I was standing out there shagging for his 2nd throw that was 48'+ and nearly got killed. Then I saw his throw for the 49-8 from a distance and it literally looked as if it was shot from a cannon!” M. West

Eric Frasure, a graduate of Hopewell High School, has set a NEW WORLD RECORD for throwing the 56 lb weight for distance. In a competition at the Loch Norman Highland Games, on April 17th, the 19 year old, currently a sophomore on a track scholarship at East Carolina University, threw the 56lb weight 49 feet 8inches breaking the World Record set by Professional Scottish Heavy Athlete, Ryan Vierra. In an unusual turn of fate, Ryan Vierra was competing on the same day at the Las Vegas Highland Games and delighted the crowd by throwing 49'2" to break his own world record in the 56 lb only to find that the Amateur Eric Frasure’s throw would better his best attempt.

Eric also threw a NEW Loch Norman Highland Games Record in the 22# Hammer with an 111 feet 10 inches. “He is obviously doing an excellent job of applying what he is learning in the Hammer to the Weight for Distance. He is starting with a wide stance and forcing the weight into its orbit very fast from the start, very tight legs, hips driving through fast… very fast. His hammer, and the 28 lb are huge as well.” C. Cook

Eric has been involved in Scottish heavy throwing since the tender age of 14. While at Hopewell High School, he began training with his father, Scott Frasure and set his first world record at age 18. Just in case you think it is some sort of lucky shot note that he holds all lifting records at ECU and is the school record holder in the indoor weight and hammer throw. He is the 2005 C-USA champion in 35 lbs. weight throw, the C-USA record holder for the 35 lbs. weight throw and provisional qualifier for NCAA indoor championships, the 2005 IC4A indoor 35 lbs. weight throw champion and a 2 year letterman at ECU. Eric has plans to go to the 2008 Olympics for the Hammer throw.

The Loch Norman Highland Games Scottish Heavy Athletics competitions are run under the rules of North American Scottish Games Athletics and the Southeastern Scottish Amateur Athletics Association. The weight was 56.15 lbs on certified scales.

For more information about the sport of Scottish Heavy Throwing

The Southeastern Scottish Amateur Athletics Association www.thessaaa.com
The North American Scottish Games Athletics www.nasgaweb.com

The sport of Scottish Heavy Throwing is based on traditional field competitions dating back more than 1,000 years. The events are based on competitions with a military or agricultural background. Fo instance the 56 lb weight is half of the old agricultural hundred weight and the 28 lb weight half of that.

In 1869 George Goldie, a champion in Scottish athletics, was hired as the Director of the gymnasium at Princeton. The possession of a gymnasium by a college at this time indicated a concern for health and a regard for the value of physical activity as did the appointment of a specialist instructor. The initial rise of collegiate track and field took place at colleges having this type of facility. Typically track and field programs contained the same events as Scottish Games except for the caber toss. In 1873, Goldie's campaign at Princeton resulted in the first track and field event there. Named the "Caledonian Games" in his honor, they became the model for all other colleges yet to embark on their track and field programs.

THE LOCH NORMAN HIGHLAND GAMES SCOTTISH HEAVY THROWING EVENTS

56lb. Weight for Distance
The weight can be either block or spherical shaped with links and a handle. The overall length cannot exceed 18". The weight is thrown with one hand in a throwing area 4'­6" x 9'. The thrower must keep one foot inside this area and not step over the back line or inside face of the trig or the throw is a foul.

22lb. Hammer Throw
The hammer has a lead or steel head with a bamboo or rattan handle affixed through a hole in the head.

28lb. Weight for Distance
Same as the 56lb. Weight for Distance except a 28lb. weight is used.

56lb. Weight for Height
The weight for height is the same as used for distance except it is shorter. The weight is tossed over a cross bar with one hand.

Sheaf Toss
The sheaf is a 16lb. or 20lb. burlap or plastic bag stuffed with either chopped rope, straw, or mulch. The sheaf is tossed over a cross bar with a pitch fork.

Open Stone Put
Similar to the shot put, except a stone is used that weighs usually between 16 and 22 pounds. It is called "open" style because any style of putting is allowed with the spin and glide styles being the most popular.

Caber Toss
The Caber is a tree that has been cut and trimmed down so one end is slightly wider than the other. It can vary length from 16 to 22 feet and between 100 and 180 pounds.

The thrower must compete in all events in a particular competition.

THE CLASSES OF ATHLETES

Professional
The highest level of Scottish Athletics, prize money is awarded according to placing. This class is usually entered by invitation only.

Amateur
This is the class you want to try and get into if you are a beginner. The athletes in this class range from first-timers to experienced throwers who are trying to improve enough to compete with the pros. At some Games there can be up to three different Amateur classes to divide up Amateurs of different skill levels.


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