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The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library Family Tree
Moultrie
Beth's Weekly Moultrie Observer Column - Week 23
(This appears here courtesy of The Moultrie Observer)


This is "desk clean up" week when I finally use the information from the little yellow sticky-notes that are everywhere!
If you are looking for a Civil War ancestor remember that many men were rejected from Civil War service because of illness or injury. Medical records of drafted and rejected men are at the National Archives, group record #110. They are arranged by Congressional Districts as of 1863. Data may include residence, occupation, age, place of birth, physical characteristics or reason for rejection under "remarks."
If you have someone in your family or a friend who is celebrating a birthday of 80 years or above, wedding anniversaries of 50 years and above, send to The White House Greetings Office, The President, attn. Greeting Office, Room 30, White House, Washington, DC 20500.
You may also get White House greetings upon the birth of a child or White House greetings for a graduation.
Be sure and include all pertinent information in all cases. It usually takes about six weeks for the greeting to arrive after receipt in Washington, so write early.
There are lots of folks in Colquitt County who have family down in Madison County, Florida. Elmer's Genealogy Library and the Madison Genealogy Society will be publishing a Madison County, Florida Family History Book. They solicit your input. Articles should be submitted soon. Articles of 500 words are included at no charge. Photographs are $15.00 each.
The preferred method of submission is email. Use http://www.elmerslibrary.com You may also mail to: Elmer's Genealogy Library, 203 South Range St., Madison, FL 32340-2437.
Did you know that all passport applications from 1791 to 1925 are housed in the National Archives? Passports were not required prior to 1905 except during the Civil War, but many were applied for. Write the National Archives Passport Service Research & Liaison Branch, Room 316, 1425 K St., NW, Washington, DC 20005. After 1925 the passport applications are held by the State Department. Call 202-955-0291 if you need more information.
There is a way for you to preserve your paper records. All you have to do is get a bottle of "Archival Mist" made by Collage which can be sprayed on paper to make it acid free. It will not affect the ink, colors or adhesives and even works on newspaper clippings and scrapbooks. It will prolong paper to at least 5 times its normal life. Call 1-800-926-5524 for ordering information.
Genealogy can be important. In the country of Kuwait, only males over 21 who can trace their ancestry back 72 years are allowed to vote. It's true.
The most elusive generation to prove is the grandchild of the Revolutionary War ancestor. If married before 1850, the tie to parents is most difficult to prove unless you have a family journal, Bible record or church/baptism record. If this is your dilemma and you have none of these proofs, look at the wills of the in-laws. Grandparents often left something in their will to their grandchildren - which will tie the children to the grandparents. They may also name the daughter or son in their will!
Why, in many cultures and religious groups, was the widow traditionally expected to observe a year of mourning after the death of her husband? This has roots which go back to ancient Roman law, which specified that if a woman remarried another man within a year of the death of her husband, a child born within the following year could later designate either man as his father. This led to problems of heirship and the inheritance of property. To prevent this, civil law in early England forbade women to marry within one year. Long after the law was abolished, the custom of a year's mourning was retained.


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