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THE PRACTICE OF COOKERY
CHAPTER XIII - Pudding, Pies, Tarts


PREPARATORY REMARKS.

Great nicety is to be observed in preparing every material used for boiled or baked Puddings.

The eggs require to be well beaten; for which purpose, if many are to be done, a whisk is used; if few, a three-pronged fork. The flour is dried and shifted. The currants are carefully cleaned, by putting them into a cullender, and pouring warm water over them; if very dirty, this is to be repeated two or three times, and after being dried in a dish before the fire, they are rubbed in a coarse cloth, all the stalks and stones picked out, and then a little flour dredged over them. Or, after being washed and dried, and the stone picked out, they may be put into a cullender, some flour dredged over them, and then rubbed, till all the stalks go through the cullender. The raisins are stoned with a small sharp-pointed knife; it is cleansed in a basin of water, which also receives the seed. The Pudding-cloth must be kept especially clean, or it will impart an unpleasant taste to anything that is boiled in it; and when taken off a pudding, it ought immediately to be laid into cold water, and afterwards well washed with soda or pearl-ashes in hot water. Just before being used for a rice, bread, or batter pudding, it should be dipped into hot water, wrung, shaken, and well dredged with flour; and for a plumb, suet pudding, or any sort of fruit pudding in paste, it must be buttered before being floured.

All Pudding in Paste are tied tightly, but other puddings loosely, in the cloth. When a pudding is to be boiled in a shape, a piece of buttered white paper is put upon the top of it before the floured cloth is tied on. The pan, dish, or shape, in which a pudding is to be either boiled or baked, must always be buttered before it is filled. It is an improvement to puddings in general to let them stand some time after being prepared either for boiling or baking. When a pudding is to be boiled, it must be put on in a covered pot, in plenty of boiling water, and never for a moment be allowed to be off the boil until ready to be served. As the water wastes, more, and always boiling, must be added. A Plum Pudding is the better for being mixed the day before it is to be boiled. It may be useful to observe, that this pudding will keep for months after it is dressed, if the cloth be allowed to remain upon it, and if, when cold, it be covered with a sheet of foolscap paper, and then hung up in a cool place. When about to be used, it must be put into a clean cloth, and again boiled for an hour; or it may be cut into slices, and broiled as wanted. If, in breaking eggs, a bad one should accidentally drop into the basin amongst the rest, the whole will be spoiled; and therefore they should be broken one by one into a tea-cup. When the whites only of eggs are required for jelly, or other things, the yolks, if not broken, will keep good for two or three days, if the basin they are in be covered.

A slab of marble, stone, or slate, is preferable to wood, for rolling out paste on. The rolling-pin, cutters, and every other implement used in these processes, must be kept particularly clean; they should always be washed immediately after being used, and then well dried. Before using butter for Paste, it is laid for some time into cold water, which is changed once or twice. When salt butter is used, it is well worked in two or three waters. If it should not be convenient to make the paste immediately before it is baked, it will not suffer from standing, if made early in the morning, and the air excluded from it, by putting first a tin cover over the pie or tartlets, and above that a folded tablecloth. To ascertain if the oven be of a proper heat, a little bit of paste may be baked in it, before any thing else be put in. Puff paste requires rather a brisk oven. If too hot, it binds the surface, and prevents the steam from rising; and if too slow, it becomes sodden and flat. Raised Crusts require a quick oven; Puffs and Tartlets, which are filled with preserved fruit, are sufficiently done when the paste is baked. When large Pies have been in the oven for a few minutes, a paper is put over them to prevent their being burned.

Cheese Cakes, Queen Cakes, Spunge Biscuits, and small Spunge Cakes, require a quick oven till they have risen; afterwards the heat should be more moderate. Plum, Seed Cakes, and all large kinds, must be well soaked, and therefore do not require a brisk oven. To preserve their colour, a sheet of white paper is put over them, and after they have risen and become firm, they are turned round. To ascertain if a large cake be sufficiently done, a broad-bladed knife is plunged into the centre of it, and if dry and clean when drawn out, the cake is baked; but if any thing adheres to the blade, it must instantly be returned to the oven, and the door closed. When the oven is too hot, it is better to lessen the fire than to open the door.

PUFF PASTE.

Weigh an equal quantity of flour and butter; rub rather more than the half of the flour into one-third of the butter, then add as much cold water as will make it into a stiff paste; work it until the butter be completely mixed with the flour; make it round, beat it with the rolling-pin, dust it, as also the rolling-pin, with flour, and roll it out towards the opposite side of the slab, or paste-board, making it of an equal thickness; then, with the point of a knife, put little bits of butter all over it; dust flour over and under it, fold in the sides and roll it up; dust it again with flour, beat it a little, and roll it out, always rubbing the rolling-pin with flour, and throwing some underneath the paste, to prevent its sticking to the board. If the butter is not all easily put in at the second time of rolling out the paste, the remainder may be put in at the third; it should be touched as little as possible with the hands.

ANOTHER PUFF PASTE.

Make nearly all the flour into a stiff paste with cold water; knead it well, and divide it into two; roll out each piece rather more than a quarter of an inch thick; take the butter out of the water, and with the hands put it out into a cake or flat piece; flour one piece of the paste, lay on it the butter, which is then floured and covered with the other piece of paste; flatten it a little with the rolling-pin, and then roll it out, dusting the paste and the pin with flour before and after rolling; fold in the sides, roll it up, and repeat the rolling out, folding up, and dusting with flour, till the butter is incorporated thoroughly with the paste.

Puff paste, if good, will rise into blisters in the course of rolling it out; it may be made with three quarters of a pound of butter to one of flour; the flour should be dried, and is the better for being sifted. When the paste is rolled out for the last time, and made a quarter of an inch thick, place upon it the dish to be covered; and having dipped the paste-cutter into flour, run it round by the rim; the cover being thus cut, lay it aside, and cut a border for the rim of the dish; wet it with water, and lay on the border, brush it over with a little water, and put on the cover; ornament it with the paste-cutter, notching it all round the edge; make a hole in the middle, take a small bit of paste, roll it out as thin as paper, dust it with flour, and fold it in four, pinch, or gather it round, wet it, and put it into the opening in the pie, which must also be wetted; cut it twice across, and with the knife turn out the folds to resemble leaves; this ornament is for meat pies – those of fruit have merely a small hole made in the centre.

PASTE FOR CHEESE CAKE.

Rub equal quantities of flour and butter together, with a little pounded and sifted loaf sugar; make it into a paste with warm milk, roll it out, and line the pans with it.

CRISP PASTE.

Rub a quarter of a pound of butter into a pound of flour; add two table-spoonfuls of pounded loaf sugar, and the well-beaten yolks of two or three eggs; work it well with a horn spoon, and roll it out very thin, touching it as little as possible with the hands; the moment before putting it into a quick oven, rub it over with the well-beaten white of an egg, and sift all over the tart finely pounded sugar.

This crust may be used for any fruit tarts.

SHORT PIE CRUST.

Rub into twelve ounces of dried and sifted flour, three ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and four ounces of fresh butter; add the beaten yolks of three, and the whites of two eggs; roll it out thin. With a feather put a little of the beaten white of an egg over the top of the pie, just before it is put into the oven.

RICH SHORT PASTE.

Weigh equal quantities of flour, of butter, and of pounded and sifted loaf sugar; rub the butter with the flour, then mix in the sugar, and rub it together till it will roll out; put it about half an inch thick over the tart, which may be of cherries, raspberries, or currants.

ANOTHER RICH SHORT PASTE.

Rub into three quarters of a pound of flour, a quarter of a pound of lard and a spoonful of grated sugar. Make it into a paste with milk, roll it out, and add a quarter of a pound of butter. For a fruit tart, it must be rolled out half an inch thick.

FINE PASTE.

Dry and sift a pound of flour; weigh half a pound of butter and two ounces of fresh hog’s lard; mix with the flour two well-beaten whites of eggs, and add as much water as will make it into a stiff paste; work it well, roll it out, and put over it the butter and hog’s lard; flour it, and fold in the sides, and roll it till the butter is well mixed with the paste.

PASTE FOR A COMMON DUMPLING.

Rub into a pound of flour, six ounces of butter; then work it into a paste with two well-beaten eggs and a little water. This paste may be baked, a large table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar being added to it.

TART PASTED.

Rub into half a pound of flour, six ounces of butter and one table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar; make it into a paste with hot water.

SWEET PASTE.

Rub into half a pound of flour, three ounces of butter and the same of pounded loaf sugar; add one beaten egg, and as much warm water as will make it into a paste; roll it thin for any kind of fruit tart; rub it over with the beaten white of an egg, and sift sugar over it.

RICH PASTE FOR TARTS AND CHEESE CAKES.

Pound and sift six ounces of loaf sugar, and add it by degrees to eight ounces of fresh butter beaten to a cream; beat four eggs till very light, and add them, together with a little grated lemon-peel, some cinnamon or nutmeg; stir in dried and sifted flour, to make it into a paste, but not very stiff.

PASTE FOR TARTS.

Mix one ounce of grated and sifted loaf sugar with one pound of flour; make it into a stiff paste with a gill of boiling cream; work well into it three ounces of butter, and roll it out very thin.

RICE PASTE.

Mix together half a pound of sifted ground rice and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; work it into a paste with cold water, dredge flour over the paste-board and rolling-pin, roll out the paste, and put over it, in little bits, another quarter of a pound of butter; fold and roll it out three times, strewing each time a little flour over and under it, as also over the rolling-pin. Cover the tart, and glaze it before being baked.

This paste must be eaten the day it is baked.

ANOTHER RICE PASTE.

Boil, in a pint of water, half a pound of good rice; drain off the water, and pound the rice in a mortar, with a small bit of butter, and an egg beaten; then roll it out to cover any fruit tart.

POTATO PASTE.

Mash sixteen ounces of boiled potatoes, while they are warm; then rub them between the hands, together with twelve ounces of flour; when it is well mixed, and all looks like flour, add half a tea-spoonful of salt, and, with a little cold water, make it into a stiff paste; beat and roll it out three or four times, making it very thin the last time. Lay over it black currant jam, raspberries, or any sort of preserve; rub the edges in water, roll it up like a bolster pudding, and boil it in a buttered and floured cloth for three or four hours.

SUET PASTE.

Rub well with half a pound of fresh beef suet, chopped as finely as possible, three quarters of a pound of flour, and half a tea-spoonful of salt; make it into a stiff paste with cold water; work it well, beat it with the rolling-pin, and roll it out two or three times. This paste answers for any kind of boiled fruit pudding.

ANOTHER SUET PASTE.

Cut small three quarters of a pound of fresh beef suet; pound it very finely in a mortar with a little lukewarm milk, carefully picking out all the strings; make it up into a roll, and rub it into a pound and a half of flour; moisten it with milk, and roll it out three or four times.

PASTE FOR FAMILY PIES.

Rub into one pound and a half of flour, half a pound of butter; wet it with cold water sufficient to make it into a stiff paste; work it well, and roll it out two or three times.

BEEF DRIPPING PASTE.

Rub into one pound of flour, half a pound of clarified beef dripping, till it all look like flour; work it to a stiff paste with cold water, and roll it out two or three times. This paste answers very well for common pies, but must be used when hot and fresh baked.

RAISED CRUST.

Melt, in one pint of water, one pound of fresh lard; weigh four pounds of flour, put it into a basin, and when the water and lard is hot, with a horn spoon stir it by degrees amongst the flour. When well mixed, work it with the hands till it is a stiff paste, when it is fit for use.

ANOTHER RAISED CRUST.

Put into a sauce-pan one pint and a half of water, four pounds of flour, and four ounces and a half of butter; stir it till it is a thick paste; take it out, and add the yolks of three or four beaten eggs; work it well together; roll it out rather more than half an inch thick; cut out the top and bottom, and a long piece of a proper depth for the sides. Brush round the bottom with well-beaten whites of eggs; set on the sides, keeping the paste rather within the edge of the bottom; pinch it all round, to make the pieces adhere, then fill the pie, and brush round the upper sides of the crust and the outer edges of the cover with egg; lay on the cover, pinch it round neatly, and ornament it according to fancy with leaves, festoons, or chains of rings made of the paste.

FINE ICING FOR TARTS AND PUFFS.

Pound and sift four ounces of refined loaf sugar; beat up the white of an egg, and by degrees add to it the sugar, till it look white and is thick. When the tarts are baked, lay the icing over the top with a brush or feather, and then return them to the oven to harden, but take care that it do not become brown.

VOL-AU-VENT.

Roll out puff paste about half an inch thick; lay upon it a small oval flat dish, and cut out, with a paste cutter, two pieces the same size. Butter the dish, and lay upon it one piece of the paste; brush over the edge to the width of the rim of the dish with water, and lay upon it the second piece of paste, and with a tin cutter, the size of the inner part f the dish, cut the paste nearly through, or cut it round with a knife. Bake it of a light brown colour. Cut off the central part, and fill it with pulled chicken or turkey, minced veal, stewed oysters, or any sort of fricassee. Put on the top, and serve it on a napkin.

PHEASANT PIE.

Cut off the heads of a brace of pheasants, and bone them carefully; make a forcemeat of grated bread, pounded veal, and fat bacon, in equal quantities, and half the quantity of one of these of minced beef suet, also a little grated lean ham; season it with truffles, nutmeg, mace, pepper, and salt – a very little garlic is an improvement; bind it with the beaten yolks of eggs. Put a part of it inside of the pheasants, and fry them for a few minutes. Put them into a standing crust, or a deep dish, lined with slices of fat bacon and some forcemeat laid at the bottom; add a glass of brandy, some truffles, and more of the forcemeat; then lay slices of fat bacon over the whole. If in a dish, cover it with a coarse paste, and bake it for four or five hours. When the pie is to be used, take off the coarse paste, and put over the dish a rich puff paste, and when this is sufficiently baked, it may be served.

Chickens, partridges, or grouse, may be substituted for pheasants, and mushrooms for truffles.

PARTRIDGE PIE.

Truss half-a-dozen partridges in the same way in which chickens are done for boiling, and season them with pepper, salt, and mace. For a forcemeat, bake in an oven two pounds of lean veal, and half a pound of lean ham sliced, and seasoned with a shallot, parsley, and lemon thyme minced, white pepper, nutmeg, and salt, and with half a pound of butter put over it. When the meat is perfectly tender, drain it, pound it in a mortar, and then mix with it the liquor. To a part of this forcemeat, add grated bread and a little chopped fat bacon; put a bit of it, the size of a walnut, into each bird. Make a raised crust, and form it of an oblong shape; put into the bottom a layer of forcemeat an inch thick, and then slices of fat bacon; brush the edges of the top and sides with the beaten-up white of an egg, put on the top, and pinch it close. It will take three hours and a half to bake; and before serving, the outside should be brushed over with the white of an egg, and covered neatly with foolscap paper, cut into a fringe, round the top. This pie may be baked in a dish, and the forcemeat made of cold ham and roast veal pounded.

GOOSE PIE.

Prepare a very strong raised crust, and make the sides thick and stiff. Take the bones out of a goose, turkey, and fowl, cutting each down the back; season them highly with pepper, salt, mace, cloves, and nutmeg, all finely pounded and well mixed. Lay the goose upon a dish, with the breast skin next to the dish; lay in the turkey, put some slices of boiled ham and tongue, and then the fowl; cover it with little bits of ham or bacon. Put it all into the pie, made of an oval form, and the sides to stand an inch and a half above the meat; put on the top, and make a hole in the centre of it. Brush the outside of the pie all over with the beaten whites of eggs, and bind it round with three folds of buttered paper; paste the top over in the same way, and when it comes out of the oven, take off the paper, and pour in at the top, through a funnel, a pound and a half of melted butter.

SWEETBREAD AND PALATE PIE.

Scald the sweetbreads, and when quite cold, fry them a nice brown; boil the palates tender, skin, and cut them into square pieces. Brown a pit of butter with flour, and a pint of good gravy seasoned highly with spice and salt; put in the sweetbreads and palates, and let them stew till nearly ready for eating. Lay them into the pie-dish, and break down in the sauce the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, and add it. This pie is better to be prepared the day before it is required. Cover it with a rich puff paste, and when the paste is sufficiently baked, the pie may be served.

ANOTHER SWEETBREAD PIE.

Parboil five or six sweetbreads; cut them into two or three pieces, stew them ten or fifteen minutes in a little white stock, with some chopped shallot, a bit of butter rolled in flour, some salt, with white pepper, and a good many mushrooms. Put them into a pie-dish, with some asparagus tops, forcemeat balls, and hard-boiled yolks of eggs, and slices of fat bacon on the top; cover it, and bake it till the paste be done enough; or it may be put into a vol-au-vent, and served upon a napkin; or baked in a pate.

FRENCH PIE.

Mince some cold roast veal together with a little ham; season it highly with pepper, salt, mace, and lemon-peel; add a large table-spoonful of mushroom catsup, and a quarter of a hundred of oysters, with their liquor, and three or four table-spoonfuls of rich gravy. Line a dish with puff paste, put in the ingredients, cover the pie, and let it remain in the oven only long enough to bake the paste.

BEEF STEAK PIE.

Cut the steaks off a rump, or any nice piece of beef, fat and lean together, about half an inch thick; beat them a little with a rolling-pin; put over them some pepper, salt, and parboiled onion minced, or grated bread seasoned with pepper, salt, and pickled cucumber minced; roll them up and pack them neatly into the dish, or lay the beef in slices; add some spoonfuls of gravy, and a tea-spoonful of vinegar. Cover the pie with a puff paste, and bake it for an hour.

It is a common but mistaken opinion, that it is necessary to put stock or water into meat pies. Beef, mutton, veal, and pork, if not previously dressed, will be found to yield a sufficiency of gravy, and the pie will be better without any additional liquid.

VEAL PIE.

Cut a neck of veal into neat steaks; season them well with white pepper, salt, mace, and grated nutmeg mixed; pack them closely into a dish, and put in half a pint of white stock; five hard-boiled yolks of eggs may be added; put puff paste on the edge of the dish, and cover with the same. Lambs’ tails may be made into a pie, with lamb chops seasoned in the same manner as the above.

ANOTHER VEAL PIE.

Cut into steaks a loin or breast of veal; season them highly with white pepper, salt, grated nutmeg, mace, and a little lemon-peel mixed; lay them into the bottom of a dish, and then a few slices of sweetbreads seasoned with the spices; add some oysters, forcemeat balls, and the yolks of hard-boiled eggs, half a pint of white stock, a glass of white wine, and a table-spoonful of lemon pickle; put puff paste on the edge of the dish, and cover with the same; bake it for one hour.

ANOTHER VEAL PIE.

Chop, but not very small the meat of a cold loin of veal; season it with minced parsley, white pepper, salt, grated lemon-peel, and nutmeg; add rather more than half a pint of stock made with the bones, thickened with a bit of butter rolled in flour, and seasoned with a tea-spoonful of lemon pickle, and a table-spoonful of white wine; make a paste of the fat of the loin, and an equal quantity of flour; rub it together, and mix with it a little cold water, roll it out two or three times, line the sides of the dish, put in the meat, and cover it.

SOLID VEAL PIE.

Stew in veal stock, till it be perfectly tender and like a jelly, a piece of a knuckle of veal, with the gristles adhering to it; let it cool, and then pull the meat and gristles into small bits; butter a pie-dish or shape, and lay at regular distances the yolks of some hard-boiled eggs, and some of the white parts cut into rings or strips; then put over them some bits of the meat and gristle, and strew over it some white pepper, salt, and grated nutmeg mixed; add a little of the gravy, and then more eggs, with small bits of beet-root, green pickles, and the red part of a carrot cut to fancy; add more meat-seasoning, and all the gravy; when the shape is full, put it into an oven for twenty minutes, and when quite cold, turn it out. If rightly done, it will have a glazed appearance, and the variety of colours looks well by candle-light.

MUTTON PIE.

Cut into neat steaks a loin or the best end of a neck of mutton; pare off the skin and fat, season them highly with pepper and salt mixed, an a little finely-minced onion. If the loin, divide the kidney in two, season it with pepper and salt, lay the steaks into a dish, and add a little stock made with the trimmings, three table-spoonfuls of port wine, and one of mushroom catsup; cover the dish with puff paste.

PORK PIES.

With a raised crust, make round shapes about the size of a small plate, and nearly three inches high; pare off the rind and part of the fat, and cut into neat short steaks a loin or neck of pork; beat them with a rolling-pin, season them highly with pepper and salt, pack them closely into the shapes, wet the edges, put on the top, and pinch it all round; make a small hole in the middle of the crust, and if to be eaten hot, pour in, before serving, some white gravy, with a little white wine, and a tea-spoonful of vinegar in it. They will keep good in cold weather for a fortnight or three weeks, and may be served for breakfast or luncheon.

VENISON PASTY.

Cut a neck or breast into small steaks; rub them over with a seasoning of sweet herbs, grated nutmeg, pepper, and salt; fry them slightly in butter; line the sides and edges of a dish with puff paste, lay in the steaks, and add half a pint of rich gravy made with the trimmings of the venison; add a glass of port wine, and the juice of half a lemon, or a tea-spoonful of vinegar; cover the dish with puff paste, and bake it nearly two hours. Some more gravy may be poured into the pie before serving it.

ANOTHER VENISON PASTY.                    

Cut into small pieces the meat of a breast or shoulder, fat and lean; season them highly with pepper, salt, and a little beaten mace; place them in a dish, and put some thin slices of butter over the top; wet the edges, and cover the dish with a paste half an inch thick, made of flour and water, and a small quantity of dripping; bake it for two hours; when cold, take off the crust, and cover the dish with a rich puff paste, and bake it nearly an hour. It will keep for some time if the coarse paste be not removed. In this manner most meat pies may be made when required to be kept.

SHEEP’S HEAD PIE.

Scald and clean nicely a sheep’s head and feet; parboil them, and when cold, cut off all the meat in square bits; season with pepper, salt, and a little finely-minced onion. Pack the meat closely into a pudding dish or shape, adding some bits of butter; and fill up the dish with some rich highly-seasoned gravy, or with some of the liquor that the head and feet were boiled in. Cover the dish with a coarse paste, and bake the pie for one hour. When cold, and to be served, the paste is taken off, and the pie is cut into slices like potted meat, and garnished with curled parsley.

MOORFOWL PIE.

Pick clean, and wash very nicely, five or six moorfowl; truss them as chickens are done for boiling; season them highly with two or three pounded cloves, some salt, black and Jamaica pepper, all mixed; put into each bird a bit of butter rolled in the spices, lay them closely into a dish, and add half a pint of rich brown stock, and a wine glass of port wine; cover the dish with puff paste, and bake it one hour.

HARE PIE.

Cut the hare into small joints; divide the back into five or six pieces, wash it extremely well, and let it lie some time in cold water; dry, and season it highly with two pounded cloves, some black and Jamaica pepper; lay it in a dish with half a pint of brown stock, and two wine glasses of port wine; cover the dish with puff paste. For a family dinner, and when it is to be eaten hot, the paste may be made of lard or dripping.

GIBLET PIE.

Scald two or three set of goose-giblets, pick and singe them; take the outer skin off the feet, which, with the pinions, cut into two, the neck into three, the gizzard into four, and the liver and heart into two bits; wash them all clean, put them in a sauce-pan, cover them with water, add two onions, a little salt, and a tea-spoonful of whole black pepper; stew them till the gizzards be tender; take them out, and put them into the pie-dish, season  them with more pepper and salt, strain the liquor, and add half a pint of it with a glass of port wine; when cold, put puff paste round the edge of the dish, and cover it with the same. A beef-steak, well-seasoned, may be laid in the bottom of the dish.

ANOTHER GIBLET PIE.

Stew the giblets in a little water, with an onion stuck with two or three cloves, a bunch of sweet herbs, some salt, and whole black pepper; cut a fowl into joints, skin and wash it, season it with white pepper, salt, and half an onion finely minced. Take out the onion, herbs, and whole pepper; put the fowl, giblets, and gravy, into a dish, add a glass of white wine, and two table-spoonfuls of mushroom catsup; cover the dish with puff paste, and bake it for an hour.

CHICKEN PIE.

Pick clean, and singe the chickens; if they are very young keep them whole, and truss them as for boiling; if large, cut them into joints, and take off the skin, wash and dry them well, season them with salt, white pepper, grated nutmeg and mace mixed, and if whole, put into them a bit of butter rolled in flour, and a little of the mixed spices; lay them into a dish with the livers, gizzards, and hearts well seasoned, add half a pint of white stock, a glass of white wine, a table-spoonful of lemon pickle, or some pickled mushrooms, and the yolks of five hard-boiled eggs; cover with a puff paste, and bake it for an hour. Slices of cold ham and forcemeat balls may be added to this pie.

Or. Wash in cold water two or three ounces of macaroni; break it into small bits, simmer it for nearly half an hour in milk and water, drain, and put it with the chickens into the dish, and also three quarters of an ounce of butter. Omit the lemon pickle, or pickled mushrooms, when macaroni is added.

PIGEON PIE.

Draw, pick, singe, and wash six or eight newly-killed pigeons; cut off the pinions, necks, and feet, truss them, put into each bird a bit of butter mixed with flour, and rolled in pepper, salt, and grated nutmeg mixed; rub the pigeons and giblets over with seasoning, as also one or two slices of tender beef, which put into the bottom of the dish, and add the pigeons and giblets; stew over a good deal of the seasoning, and put in half a pint of rich brown stock, with a little port wine, and the yolks of five hard-boiled eggs; cover the dish with puff paste; stick into the paste four of the feet round the ornament of paste in the centre of the dish.

ITALIAN PIE.

Mix together some chopped thyme, parsley, and one or two sage leaves, some salt, white and cayenne pepper; lay into the bottom of a dish some thin slices of lean veal, sprinkle them with the seasoning, and add slices of ham, and a few forcemeat balls; put a layer of seasoned veal, and of ham and forcemeat balls, till the dish is full, and then add the yolks of five hard-boiled eggs, and some good white stock; cover the dish with a puff paste, and bake it for an hour. Before serving, pour in, through a funnel, at the centre of the crust, a tea-cupful of rich cream.

ROOK PIE.

Draw and skin six or eight rooks; let them lie in cold water one or two hours, cut out the back bones, wash the birds, season them highly with pepper and salt, and pack them closely into a pie-dish; add half a pint of gravy or water, and lay over them half a pound of fresh butter; cover the dish with a flour-and-water paste, and bake them for two hours. The following day, take off the coarse, and cover with puff paste, and bake it till it be sufficiently done.

FIFE PIE.

Skin a rabbit, cut it into bits, and let it lie for an hour in cold water; cut into small thin slices a pound of fat pickled pork; season the meat well with pepper, a little grated nutmeg, and salt. Make forcemeat balls with the liver minced, some grated bread, and chopped fat bacon; season with mince parsley, lemon thyme, grated nutmeg, pepper, and salt; bind with an egg, pack the meat and balls closely into a dish, and add a tea-cupful of good gravy, and three table-spoonfuls of white wine, cover it with a puff paste, and bake it for an hour.

HAM PIE.

Half boil a ham, skin it, and take out the bone; fill the space with a rich forcemeat, and season the ham with pepper, mace, cinnamon, and cloves, pounded and well mixed; put it into a raised crust made of an oval shape, and lay over it a few bay leaves, and some slices of bacon; close, and bake it four or five hours.

DEVIZES PIE.

Cut into very thin slices, after being dressed, cold calf’s head, with some of the brains, pickled tongue, sweetbreads, lamb, veal, a few slices of bacon, and hard-boiled eggs; put them in layers into a pie-dish, with plenty of seasoning between each, of cayenne, white pepper, allspice, and salt; fill up the dish with rich gravy; cover it with a flour-and-water paste; bake it in a slow oven, and when perfectly cold, take off the crust, and turn the pie out upon a dish; garnish it with parsley and pickled eggs cut into slices.

VEGETABLE PIE.

Of a variety of vegetables, such as carrots, turnips, potatoes, artichoke bottoms, cauliflower, French beans, peas, and small button onions, equal quantities of each; half boil them in good broth for a short time, put them into a pie-dish, cover it with puff paste, and bake it in a slow oven; make a gravy of a bit of veal, a slice of ham, pepper, salt, a bay leaf, mushrooms, shallots, parsley, and an onion; when it has boiled thick, strain the liquor, and mix in three or four table-spoonfuls of cream, and pour it into the pie before being served, The cream may be omitted.

TRIPE PIE.

Lay into the bottom of a dish some thinly-sliced cold or raw ham, then put in a layer of tripe with the jelly adhering to it, season with pepper and salt, and add a bit of butter; fill the dish in this manner, and put in a few table-spoonfuls of brown stock; cover the dish with puff paste. A beef-steak may be substituted for the ham, laid into the bottom, and the dish filled up with tripe.

A PIE OF COLD BEEF VEAL OR MUTTON.

Pound in a mortar some boiled potatoes; boil a cupful of milk, and while hot, mix it with potatoes, and beat them till they become like a light paste; roll it out, cut it, with a flat dish, the size of the pie-dish, so as it may be laid from off it upon the pie; cut the meat into slices, season it with pepper and salt, put half a pint of gravy, wet the edges of the dish, and put over it the paste, and bake it till the paste be sufficiently done.

LEICESTERSHIRE MEDLEY PIE.

Cut some apples into quarters, take out the core, but do not peel them; cut thick slices of cold fat bacon, and any sort of cold roasted meat, season them with pounded ginger, pepper, and salt; put into the dish a layer of each, and pour over the top a large cupful of ale; cover the dish with a paste made with dripping or lard.

SEA PIE.

Skin and cut a large fowl into joints; wash and lay it into cold water for an hour; cut some salt beef into thin slices, and if it is very salt, soak it a short time in water; make a paste of flour and butter in the proportion of half a pound of butter to one of flour; cut it out into round pieces according to the size of the bottom of the pot in which the pie is to be stewed; rub the bottom of a round iron pot with butter, and lay in a layer of the beef, seasoned with pepper, and finely-minced onion; then put a layer of the paste, and then the fowl, highly seasoned with pepper, onion, and a little salt; add another layer of paste, and pour in three pints of cold water; cover the pot closely, and let it stew gently for nearly four hours, taking care if does not burn, which, if neglected, it is apt to do. It is served in a pudding dish, and answers well for a family dinner.

BEEF-STEAK PUDDING.

Make a past with suet or butter; roll it out large enough to line a quart basin; cut thin slices of tender beef, free from skin and sinews, beat them with a rolling-pin, season them with pepper, salt, and a very little finely-minced onion; roll up each steak; rub the basin with butter, lay in the paste, and put in the steaks, wet the edges of the paste, and fold it over closely; dip into hot water a pudding-cloth, wring, shake, and dust it with flour, tie it over the rim of the basin, put it on in boiling water, and boil it for three hours.

RABBIT PUDDING.

Wash a rabbit in several water; cut off the head, and cut the rest into small pieces; make a nice suet paste, allowing a quarter of a pound of fresh beef or veal suet, finely minced to one pound of flour; season the rabbit with pepper, salt, and a little mushroom powder, put it all except the head into the paste, with a little flour and water; boil it in a cloth for two hours and a half; serve it with gravy in a sauce-tureen. One or two thin slices of pickled pork may be added.

A young hare may be made into a pudding in the same manner; and if an old one is used, cut off the bits of meat from the back and legs for the pudding, and make the rest into soup.

LOBSTER PIE.

Take out, as whole as possible, the meat from the tail and claws of two or three boiled lobsters; cut them into slices, and season them with nutmeg, pepper, and salt. Make a forcemeat of the soft part of the bodies, together with grated bread, some parsley, and one anchovy minced, grated lemon-peel, mace, salt, and pepper, the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs bruised, and a bit of butter; mix it all together with the well-beaten yolk of an egg, and make it up into small balls. Put the lobster into the pie-dish, and cover it with the forcemeat balls and hard-boiled yolks of eggs, and more than half a pint of rich white stock, a glass of white wine, and a table-spoonful of lemon juice or vinegar. Cover it with puff paste, and bake it only till the paste be done.

ANOTHER LOBSTER PIE.

Boil the lobster, and cut the meat of the tail into four bits; take out the meat from the claws and bodies, pound it in a mortar, add the soft part of one lobster, and season with pepper, salt, and nutmeg; add three table-spoonfuls of vinegar; melt half a pound of butter, and mix it with the pounded meat and the crumb of a slice of bread grated. Put puff paste round the edge and side of the dish; put in the tail of the lobster, then a layer of oysters with their liquor, and next the pounded meat; cover it with a puff paste, and bake it till the paste be done.

Before serving, pour in some rich gravy, made of a little weak stock in which the lobster shells have been boiled, with an onion, pepper, and salt, and which has been strained and thickened with a bit of butter rolled in flour.

HADDOCK PIE.

Clean, skin, and wash the haddocks; take off the heads and tails, and cut the fish into two or three pieces; season them lightly with finely-minced onion, parsley, some salt and pepper; make forcemeat balls, with rather more than half a pint of white stock, and a glass of white wine; put puff paste round the edge of the dish, and cover it with the same.

EEL PIE.

Clean, skin, and wash them; take off the heads and tails, and cut the eels into pieces of two or three inches; season them highly with pepper, salt, and grated nutmeg. Put them into a dish, and add a quarter of a pint of white stock, or water, a glass of white wine, and a large table-spoonful of lemon pickle; put puff paste round the edge of the dish, and cover with the same.

SHRIMP PIE.

Boil in salt and water three pints of shrimps or prawns; pick, and season them with a table-spoonful of essence of anchovies, one of lemon pickle, some pounded pepper and mace, and a little salt. Lay some bits of butter into the bottom of the dish; put in the shrimps, with a tea-cupful of rich gravy, and a glass of white wine; cover it with a puff paste, and bake it till the paste be done enough.

OYSTER PIE.

Beard a quart of fine oysters, strain the liquor, and add them to it. Cut into thin slices the kidney fat of a loin of veal; season them with white pepper, salt, mace, and grated lemon-peel; lay them into the bottom of a pie-dish; put in the oysters and liquor, with a little more seasoning; put over them the marrow of two bones. Lay a border of puff paste round the edge of the dish; cover it with paste, and bake it nearly three quarters of an hour.

LOBSTER PATTIES.

Pick the meat and red berries out of a lobster, mince them finely; add grated bread, chopped parsley, and butter; season with grated nutmeg, white pepper, and salt; add a little white stock, cream, and a table-spoonful of white wine, patty-pans with puff paste; put into each a bit of crumb of bread about an inch square, wet the edge of the paste, and cover it with another bit; with the paste-cutter, mark it all round the rim, and pare off the paste round the edge of the patty-pan. When baked, take off the top, and with a knife take out the bread and a little of the inside paste, put in the prepared lobster, lay on the top paste, and serve them in a napkin.

Another way to prepare the paste. Roll it out nearly half an inch thick, and cut it into rounds with a tin cutter, and, with one two sizes less, mark it in the middle about half through. When they are baked, carefully cut out the inner top of the paste, and scoop out the inside, so as to make room for the mince, which put in, and place on the top.

VEAL PATTIES.

Mince some under-done veal with a little parsley, one or two sage leaves, a very little onion; season with grated lemon-peel, nutmeg, pepper, and salt; add some grated lean ham or tongue, moisten it with some good gravy, heat it up, and put it into patties.  

PATTIES IN FRIED BREAD.

Cut the crumb of a loaf of bread into squares or round pieces nearly three inches high, and cut bits the same width for tops; mark them neatly with a knife; fry the bread of a light brown colour in clarified beef dripping or fine lard. Scoop out the inside crumb, taking care not to go too near to the bottom; fill them with minced meat, prepared as for patties, with stewed oysters, or with sausage meat; put on the tops, and serve them upon a napkin.

VOL-AU-VENT.

Cut some cold turkey or veal into small thin slices; season it with dried lemon-peel grated, white pepper, pounded mace, and salt; add one anchovy, some garlic and onion pounded, also a little good gravy, a table-spoonful of lemon pickle, one of white wine, and half an ounce of butter rolled in flour; then make it quite hot, but do not allow it to boil, and serve it in the prepared vol-au-vent. The gravy may be made with the bones, or a little cream, and the beaten yolk of an egg may be substituted for the cream.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE VOL-AU-VENT.

In opening the oyster, separate them from the liquor, which must be strained; take off the beards, and add to them the liquor, together with some white stock, a bit of butter rolled in flour, two or three blades of mace, a bit of lemon-peel, white pepper, and salt; simmer them for fifteen or twenty minutes, and a little before putting them into the vol-au-vent, pick out the mace and lemon-peel, add a table-spoonful of white wine and three of good cream, and make it quite hot. To make oyster patties: when they are bearded, cut them into three or four bits, and prepare them in the same manner.

RISSOLES.

Cut puff paste with a round tin cutter, about three inches wide; have ready some cold fowl or veal, very finely minced, and seasoned with a little pounded garlic, grated lemon-peel, and moistened with a little good gravy. Put some of the mince upon one bit of the paste, wet the edges, and lay over it another bit; press it gently round the rim; brush them all over with a well-beaten egg, and strew over them sifted bread crumbs; fry them of a light brown in boiling clarified beef dripping, and lay them upon the back of a sieve before the fire to drain. Serve them in a napkin. The paste may be cut of the size of a large breakfast plate, then the mince put into the middle of it, and edges wet all round, and gathered up into the form of a pear, brushed over with egg, and strewed over with bread crumbs. Serve in a dish garnished with fried parsley.

PANCAKE RISSOLES.

Mince finely some cold veal; season it with grated lemon-peel, nutmeg, white pepper, salt, and a little lemon pickle; warm it up with some good gravy, and a small bit of butter rolled in flour. Have ready a batter as for pancakes, seasoned with a little salt and grated nutmeg. Fry a thin pancake, turn it, and put into the middle two table-spoonfuls of the minced veal; fold it in at each side and at the ends in an oblong form, and fry them of a light brown colour; lay them  upon the back of a sieve to drain before the fire. Four or six will make a dish.

They are served as a corner or top dish.

MINCE PIES.

Weigh equal quantities of fresh lemons, cleaned currants, stoned raisins, fresh beef suet minced, and good brown sugar. Cut the lemons in half, squeeze and strain the juice; put the skins into a sauce-pan of cold water, cover it closely, pound them in a mortar. Grate a small nutmeg, and cut very small a little citron; mix all the ingredients thoroughly, adding the lemon-juice last, and mixing it in well; then pack it into small jars; upon the top put a bit of white paper dipped into spirits, and tie the jars over with paper.

This will keep good for a twelvemonth, and when it is to be made into pies, dust the pans with flour, line them with puff paste, and put in the mince meat; wet the edges of the paste, lay on the top, and cut it even round the edge; mark it all round neatly with a paste cutter, and pare off the loose paste with scissors. The mince meat may be baked in a large patty-pan lined with puff paste.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE MINCE PIES.

Carefully stone and cut, but not too small, one pound and a half of bloom raisins; cut small half a pound of orange-peel, mince finely half-a-dozen of middling-sized good apples, a quarter of a pound of sweet almonds, pounded to a paste with a little white wine, half a nutmeg grated, a quarter of an ounce of Jamaica pepper, one head of clove, and a little cinnamon pounded; one pound and a half of fresh beef suet, minced finely, one pound of good brown sugar; mix all these ingredients extremely well, and add half a pint of white wine, and one glass of brandy. Pack it closely into small stone jars, and tie paper over them. When it is to be used, add a little more wine.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE MINCE PIES.

Cut the root off a neat’s tongue; rub the tongue well with salt, let it lie four days, wash it perfectly clean, and boil it till it becomes tender; skin, and when cold, chop it very finely. Mince as small as possible tow pounds of fresh beef suet from the sirloin; stone and cut small two pounds of bloom raisins; clean nicely two pounds of currants, pound and sift half an ounce of mace and a quarter of an ounce of cloves; grate a large nutmeg: mix all these ingredients thoroughly, together with one pound and a half of good brown sugar. Pack it in jars.

When it is to be used, allow, for the quantity sufficient to make twelve small mince pies, five finely-minced apples, the grated rind and juice of a large lemon, and a wine glass and a half of brandy; put into each a few bits of citron and preserved orange-peel.

Three or four whole green lemons, preserved in good brown sugar, and cut into thin slices, may be added to the mince meat.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE MINCE PIES.

Two pound of fresh set minced finely, two of well-cleaned currants, two of good apples minced, one pound of loaf sugar pounded, the peel of two lemons grated, and their juice; of mace, cinnamon, and cloves pounded, finely sifted, and dried before the fire, a quarter and half a quarter of an ounce each; half a nutmeg grated, a quarter of a pint of brandy, and the same of sweet wine. The materials must all be prepared, weighed, and then well mixed together, and packed in small jars.

BRANDY MINCED PIES.

Clean a pound of currants; mince a pound of nonpareil apples, and one of fresh beef suet; pound a pound of loaf sugar; weigh each article after being prepared; the peel of two lemons grated, and the juice of one; a quarter of a pound of citron, the same of orange-peel minced. Mix all these ingredients well with a quart of brandy.

LEMON MINCED PIES.

Weigh one pound of fine large lemons, cut them in half, squeeze out the juice, and pick the pulp from the skins; boil them in water till tender, and pound them in a mortar; add half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the same of nicely cleaned currants, and of fresh beef suet minced, a little grated nutmeg, and citron cut small. Mix all these ingredients well, and fill the patty-pans with rather more of the mince than is usually put.

APPLE PIES.

Pare, quarter, and core the apples; cut them into thin bits. Put into the bottom of a pie-dish a table-spoonful of brown sugar, with half a tea-spoonful of grated ginger and the same of lemon-peel, then a layer of apples, and so on alternately, till the dish is piled as full as it will hold. The next day, wet the rim of the dish, line it with puff or tart paste, brush it with water, and cover it with paste; press the edge all round, notch it with a paste cutter, and make a small hole with the point of a knife in the middle.

It may be seasoned with two table-spoonfuls of lemon or orange marmalade, pounded cinnamon, mace, and cloves, in addition to the ginger and lemon-peel.

CURRANT TART.

To a quart of red currants, add one pint of red raspberries, strawberries, or cherries; sweeten them well with brown sugar. Before putting in the fruit, line the side of the dish with tart paste, place in it a small tea cup, put in the fruit, and cover it with paste.

Four ounces of brown sugar are generally allowed to a quart of fruit.

CHERRY TART.

The cherries may be stoned, and a few red currants added; sweeten with loaf or brown sugar, and put into the bottom of the dish a small tea-cup; cover it with paste.

RHUBARB TART.

Strip off the peel, and if the rhubarb is large, cut it into two or three strips, and then into bits about an inch long; sweeten well with brown sugar, and cover the dish with paste.

GOOSEBERRY TART.

Gooseberries, green-gage, green apricots before the kernel gets hard, magnum-bonum, and purple egg-plums, damsons, and cranberries, are sweetened with brown sugar, and made into tarts in the same manner as the proceeding. The tops and tails must be taken off the gooseberries, and the plums may be scalded and skinned.

CHESHIRE TART.

Line a tart-dish with puff paste; fill it with a rich custard; pare and take out the core of three or four apples, place them in the custard, and put upon each some orange marmalade, or any other preserve. Bake it in an oven.

TARTLETS.

Rub over patty-pans a little bit of butter, and line them with tart or puff paste; fill them with marmalade, reserved strawberries, raspberries, currants, or any sort of fruit; take a small bit of the paste, and with the hand, roll it upon the paste board with flour till it be stiff, and will draw out in straws; hold it in one hand, and with the other draw it out; with these small strings, cross the tartlets according to fancy; wet the edge, and lay on a narrow rim of paste cut with the paste cutter.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE TARTLETS.

Roll out the paste about a quarter of an inch thick, and lay upon it the top part of the patty-pan; cut it round with the paste-cutter. Rub the patty-pans with a little butter, and line them with the paste, and place in the middle a little bit of bread, which take out when they are baked. They may be filled with any preserved fruit, and a star or leaf of paste placed on the top. To make ornaments of paste, roll it quite thin, and as even as possible; cut it with tin stars, leaves, or any other form, and bake them of a light brown colour, upon flat tins dusted with flour.

PRESERVED FRUIT TARTS.

Rub over with a little butter an oval dish, or tin shape; line it with paste, and fill it with any sort of preserved fruit. Roll out a bit of paste thin, and, with a paste-cutter, cut it into narrow strips; brush with water the rim of the shape, and lay the bars of paste across and across, and then put round a border of paste, and mark it with the paste-cutter.

PUFFS.

Roll Out puff paste nearly a quarter of an inch thick, and, with a small saucer, or tin cutter of that size, cut it into round pieces; place upon one side a raspberry or strawberry jam, or any sort of preserved fruit, or stewed apples; wet the edges, fold over the other side, and press it round with the finger and thumb. Or, cut the paste into the form of a diamond, lay on the fruit, and fold over the paste, so as to give it a triangular shape.

PYRAMID OF PASTE.

Make a rich puff paste; roll it out a quarter of an inch thick, and cut it into five or seven pieces with scalloped tin paste-cutter, which go one within another; leave the bottom and top piece entire, and cut a bit out of the centre of the others; bake them of a light brown, upon buttered paper placed upon tins. When served, build them into a pyramid, laying a different preserved fruit upon each piece of paste, and on the top a whole apricot, with a sprig of myrtle stuck into it, or three green-gages, ornamented with a branch of barberries.

CURD CHEESE CAKES.

Boil, in two quarts of cream, the well-beaten yolks of four, and the whites of five eggs; drain off the whey gently, and mix with the crud grated nutmeg, pounded cinnamon, three table-spoonfuls of best rose water, as much white wine, four ounces of pounded loaf sugar, the same quantity of butter beaten to a cream, and of pounded biscuit. Mix all these ingredients well together, and stir in a quarter of a pound of currants. Bake it in a large tin, or in patty-pans lined with paste; or it may be baked in a dish previously buttered.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CURD CHEESE CAKES.

With a little rennet, turn two quarts of new milk; drain off the whey. Rub through a sieve the curd, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; mix with it half an ounce of sweet and four bitter almonds, blanched and pounded, three ounces of pounded loaf sugar, a little candied citron cut small, the grated peel of half a lemon, three well-beaten eggs, a glass of brandy, and three ounces of currants. Mix them all well together, and bake them in patty-pans lined with paste.

POTATO CHEESE CAKES.

Boil and peel half a pound of good potatoes, bruise them in a mortar, and when nearly cold, drop in the yolk and white of an egg at intervals, until four have been added, beating the potatoes well all the time; then add a quarter of a pound of sifted bread crumbs, and put in two more eggs. Beat to a cream six ounces of fresh butter, with the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar; put it into the mortar, with the grated peel of one lemon, and mix all thoroughly. Line the patty-pans with paste, fill them three parts full, and bake them in a moderate oven.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE POTATO CHEESE CAKES.

Pound in a mortar five ounces of potatoes, with four of fresh butter, and the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, the grated peel and the juice of half a lemon, three well-beaten eggs, and a table-spoonful of brandy; mix all well together, and bake as before directed.

LEMON CHEESE CAKES.

Pound in a mortar with rose water half a pound of blanched sweet almonds; mix them with the grated peel of two lemons, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the same quantity of melted butter when nearly cold, and eight well-beaten yolks and four white of eggs: - beat all the ingredients well together, and bake in patty-pans lined with paste.

Orange cheese cakes are made in the same manner; or orange marmalade may be used.

ALMOND CHEESE CAKES.

Blanch and pound, with a little orange-flower water, half a pound of sweet and ten bitter almonds; beat, with eight yolks and four whites of eggs, three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar; add one pound of melted butter when nearly cold, also one nutmeg, and the peel of one lemon grated, a wine glass of orange-flower water and one of ratafia, or of brandy; mix all the ingredients well, and bake in patty-pans lined with paste.

COCOA-NUT CHEESE CAKES.

Pare off the rind; wash and dry the nut, and grate it the flat way; dissolve a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar in four spoonfuls of water, then add the cocoa-nut, and stir it till it boils; when nearly cold, add the beaten yolks of two eggs, and a dessert-spoonful of orange-flower water; mix it all thoroughly, and bake it in patty-pans lined with paste. Sift grated sugar over them before they are baked. With the addition of one more yolk of an egg, and a quarter of a pound of butter, the above ingredients may be made into a pudding.

RICH CHEESE CAKES.

Four ounces of sifted ground rice, the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar and of melted butter, the well-beaten yolks of six eggs and the whites of three, a glass of brandy, and the grated peel of a lemon; mix all well together, and bake in patty-pans lined with paste.

MAIDS OF HONOUR.

Beat with the yolks of seven eggs half a pound of pounded loaf sugar; pound, but not too finely, the same quantity of blanched sweet almonds, with a few bitter ones, and two table-spoonfuls of orange-flower water; mix in the almonds the last thing, and bake in patty-pans lined with paste.

CHEESE CAKES.

Take one pound of pounded loaf sugar, six yolks, and four whites of eggs beaten, the juice of three fine lemons, the grated rind of two, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; put these ingredients into a sauce-pan, and stir the mixture gently over a slow fire till it be of the consistence of honey; pour it into small jars, and when cold, put paper dipped in brandy over them. It will keep good for a year.

CHEESE CAKE PUDDING.

Boil, in a quart of milk, a laurel leaf and a stick of cinnamon; strain it, and when nearly cold, add six well-beaten eggs, and two more eggs with which two table-spoonfuls of flour have been beaten; put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it over the fire till it be as thick as a custard cream; take it off, and mix in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; six ounces of sugar, and the same quantity of nicely-cleaned currants, half a grated nutmeg; add a small glassful of brandy, and bake it in a dish lined with puff paste. It may be served in a napkin.

APPLE PUDDING.

Pare and core twelve large apples; put them into a sauce-pan, with water sufficient to cover them; stew them till soft, and then beat them smooth, and mix in three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, the juice and grated peel of two lemons, and the well-beaten yolks of eight eggs; line a dish with puff paste, put in the pudding, and bake it for nearly three quarters of an hour. Before serving, grate loaf sugar all over the top till it looks white.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE APPLE PUDDING.

Pare and core ten or twelve good-sized apples; stew them with sugar, a bit of cinnamon, and the peel of a lemon, and when quite soft, rub them through a hair sieve, beat the yolks of seven, and the whites of five eggs together, with half a pint of sweet cream, and a dessert-spoonful of sifted ground rice; stir it over the fire till it boil, and then mix it well with the apples, and bake the pudding in a dish lined with puff paste.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE APPLE PUDDING.

Peel and core six very large apples; stew them in six table-spoonfuls of water, with the rind of a lemon; when soft beat them to a pulp, add six ounces of melted fresh butter, the same of good brown sugar, six well-beaten eggs, half a wine glass of brandy, and a tea-spoonful of lemon-juice; line a dish with puff paste, and when baked, stick all over the top thin chips of candied citron and lemon-peel.

ORANGE PUDDING.

Beat separately, till perfectly light, the yolks of eight, and the white of four eggs; beat with the yolk four ounces of grated loaf sugar; pound one ounce and a half of sugar biscuit, and with two table-spoonfuls of orange marmalade, mix all well together; beat before the fire with a horn-spoon four ounces of butter; line a dish with the puff paste, and just before putting the pudding into the oven, stir in the butter. Bake it for fifteen or twenty minutes.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE PUDDING.

The yolks of six, and the whites of three eggs, well beaten; three table-spoonfuls of orange marmalade, a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar pounded, the same of melted butter; three table-spoonfuls of grated bread, and a quarter of a pint of cream; mix all well together, and bake them in a dish lined with puff paste.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE PUDDING.

Cut in half three large Seville oranges; squeeze and strain the juice; boil the skins till quite soft in a good deal of water, pound them in a mortar, and mix them with the yolks of nine, and the whites of four well-beaten eggs, nearly a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the juice of the oranges, and half a pound of melted butter. Bake it in a dish lined with puff paste for half an hour.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE PUDDING.

Steep in cold water for two days, changing the water twice a-day, six large Seville oranges; put them on in cold water to boil in a closely-covered sauce-pan; when a straw will pierce them, take them out, and weigh equal quantities of pounded loaf sugar and of oranges, pound them with the sugar in a mortar till they are like a paste; take out all the white and stringy parts, and when quite smooth, pack it into jars, and tie them closely over the paper. It will keep for a year; and when it is to be made into a pudding, mix with two table-spoonfuls of it five well-beaten yolks of eggs, two ounces and a half of sugar, the same of melted butter, three table-spoonfuls of white wine, and two of rose water; beat the ingredients together for nearly half an hour; bake it in a dish lined with puff paste.

LEMON PUDDING.

Boil in water, in a closely covered sauce-pan, two large lemons till quite tender; take out the seeds, and pound the lemons to a paste; add a quarter of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the same of fresh butter beaten to a cream, and the yolks of three well-beaten eggs; mix all together, and bake it in a tine lined with puff paste; take it out, strew over the top grated loaf sugar, and serve it upon a napkin.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE LEMON PUDDING.

Cut in half three lemons; squeeze the juice, and boil the rinds in a good deal of water; change it twice, putting each time hot water upon them; when quite tender, cut them into thin parings, about half an inch long; mix them with six ounces of loaf sugar pounded, four table-spoonfuls of water, and the juice of the lemons; bake it in a tin lined with puff paste.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE LEMON PUDDING.

Beat the yolks of seven, and the whites of five eggs; grate the rind of three lemons, squeeze and strain the juice; pound three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar, and melt six ounces of butter; beat all these ingredients together for fifteen minutes; bake it in a dish lined with puff paste, turn it out, and serve it upon a napkin.

RASPBERRY PUDDING.

Mix with three ounces of raspberry jam, a gill of cream, the beaten yolks of eight eggs, some sugar, and half a pound of clarified butter; beat all well together, and bake it in a dish lined with puff paste.

A SWEET PASTY.

Pare, core, and mince six apples; blanch six ounces of sweet almonds, and cut them very small; cut finely a quarter of a pound of citron and orange-peel; cut very finely three quarters of a pound of fresh marrow; pound a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, or use good brown sugar, and a tea-spoonful of cinnamon; mix well with these ingredients a glass of brandy; line and cover the top of the dish with puff paste, and when baked, take it out, and serve it upon a napkin.

Fresh suet may be substituted for the marrow, and when there is not a sufficient quantity of the marrow, the weight may be made up with suet. Each article must be very finely minced.

BREAD PUDDING.

Cut two or three slices of bread rather thin, and without the crust; put them into a dish, and pour over them half a pint of boiling milk; let it stand till cold, and then mash the bread; lay into the bottom of a pudding-dish a layer of preserved gooseberries, then add the bread; sweeten well a pint of good milk, and mix with it three well-beaten eggs, with two table-spoonfuls of rose water; pour it over the bread, and bake it for half an hour. Before serving, nutmeg may be grated over the top.

This pudding may be boiled in a shape, for two hours, substituting for the preserved gooseberries a tea-cupful of nicely cleaned currants, and adding a glass of brandy, or any other spirit.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BREAD PUDDING.

Pour a pint of boiling milk over four ounces of bread crumbs, and two of fresh butter; cover it till cold, and mix with it three well-beaten eggs, a table-spoonful of sugar, and half the peel of a grated lemon, or a little pounded cinnamon; bake it in a buttered dish, and serve with a sweet sauce.

INDIAN MEAL, OR MAIZE, PUDDING.

Boil in a quart of good milk a tea-cupful of Indian meal; stir it constantly till thick, sweeten it with treacle or brown sugar, and stir in two well-beaten eggs, and an ounce of butter; bake it in a Dutch oven for half an hour. Half a grated nutmeg may be added, and it may be made without eggs.

A boiled Indian meal pudding is made in the same way, and after being mixed with or without the eggs in it, it is tied in a buttered and floured cloth, and boiled for two hours. It is eaten with cold or melted butter.

CHEESE PUDDING.

Beat the yolks of ten, and the whites of two eggs, till quite light; mix well with them a pound of good cheese grated, then add a quarter of a pound of fresh butter beaten to a cream, and half a pint of cream; bake it half an hour in a dish rubbed over with butter, and lined or not with puff paste. Before serving, grate Parmesan cheese over the top.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CHEESE PUDDING.

Grate one pound of mild Cheshire cheese; beat well four eggs; oil one ounce of butter:  mix these ingredients together with one gill of cream, and two table-spoonfuls of grated and sifted bread, and bake it in a dish or tin lined with puff paste.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CHEESE PUDDING.

Grate a quarter of a pound of good cheese; put it into a sauce-pan, with half a pint of new milk, and nearly two ounces of grated bread, and one beaten egg; stir it till the cheese be dissolved; put it into a buttered dish, and brown it in a Dutch oven. Serve it quite hot.

EGG PUDDING.

Melt a quarter of a pound of butter, and when nearly cold, mix well with it the following ingredients: - The well-beaten yolks of ten, and the whites of two eggs, half a pint of rich cream, half a pound of good brown sugar, two table-spoonfuls of flour, a grated nutmeg, and a glass of brandy; bake it with or without a lining of puff paste.

A PUDDING.

Beat separately the yolks and whites of six eggs; pound half a pound of loaf sugar, melt half a pound of fresh butter, blanch three ounces of sweet almonds, and pound them with a little rose water; mince four ounces of marmalade; mix all these ingredients well, and bake it in a dish lined with puff paste; turn it out, and serve it upon a napkin. It may be eaten cold.

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING.

Cut thin slices of bread and butter, without the crust; lay some in the bottom of a dish, and then put a layer of well-cleaned currants, or any preserved fruit; then more bread and butter, and so on, till the dish is nearly filled; mix with a quart of milk four well-beaten eggs, three table-spoonfuls of orange-flower or rose water; sweeten it well with brown sugar, and pour it over the bread and butter, and let it soak for two or three hours before being baked. It will take nearly an hour. Serve with a sauce, in a sauce-tureen, made with a tea-cupful of currant wine, a table-spoonful of brown sugar, three of water, and a bit of butter the size of a walnut, stirred till boiling hot.

JELLY PUDDING.

Beat to a light cream ten ounces of fresh butter, then add by degrees the well-beaten yolks of six eggs, and half a pound of loaf sugar pounded; stir in two or three table-spoonfuls of orange-flower or rose water; beat to a stiff froth the whites of six eggs, mix them in lightly; bake it five-and-twenty minutes in a dish lined with puff paste.

SAGO PUDDING.

Boil five table-spoonfuls of sago, well picked and washed, in a quart of water, also half the peel of a lemon and a stick of cinnamon; when it is rather thick, add half a pint of white wine, and sweeten it with good brown sugar; beat the yolks of six, and the whites of three eggs, pick out the lemon-peel and cinnamon, mix all well together, and bake it in a dish with or without the puff paste.

MILLET PUDDING.

Wash four table-spoonfuls of the seed; boil it in a quart of milk with grated nutmeg and lemon-peel, and stir in, when a little cooled, an ounce of fresh butter; sweeten with brown sugar, and add the well-beaten yolk of four, and the white of two eggs, and a glass of wine or spirits. Bake it in a buttered dish.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE MILLET PUDDING.

Wash a quarter of a pound of millet; mix it with a quart of new milk, three ounces of brown sugar, a quarter of a pound of butter, broken into small bits, and a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg. Put it into a well-buttered dish, and bake it for an hour and a half.

TAPIOCA PUDDING.

Wash two large table-spoonfuls of tapioca, and soak it for an hour in a little warm water; strain off the water, and mix it with the well-beaten yolks of four, and the whites of two eggs, a quart of good milk, half a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, a small tea-cupful of white wine, and sweeten it with brown sugar. Bake it in a dish, with or without puff paste round the edges.

CAMP PUDDINGS.

Put into a sauce-pan half a pint of water, a quarter of a pound of butter, a table-spoonful of brown sugar, and the peel of half a lemon, or orange. Let it just come to a boil, take it off, and stir in a quarter of a pound of sifted flour; mix it perfectly smooth, and when cold, beat in four well-beaten eggs. Half fill twelve yellow tea-cups, and bake them in a quick oven. Serve them with a sauce of wine, sugar, and butter, in a sauce-tureen.

MACAROON PUDDINGS.

Pour one pint of boiling cream over half a pound of macaroons; when cold, break them small with the back of a spoon; add the beaten yolks and the white of four eggs, with a glass of brandy, and a little pounded sugar. Put it into tea-cups, and bake them about fifteen minutes.

BAKED PUDDINGS.

Boil in a pint of milk two or three laurel leaves; strain, and stir in half a pound of grated bread, the same quantity of fresh butter, and half a grated nutmeg; when cold, add the beaten yolks of five, and the whites of three eggs; sweeten with brown sugar; half fill yellow tea-cups, and bake them in a quick oven. Serve with sweet sauce in a sauce-tureen.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BAKED PUDDINGS.

The weight of three eggs in flour, of two in butter, and two in sugar. Beat the butter to a cream, add the sugar and the flour, and mix all well together with the eggs previously well beaten; put it into four cups, and bake them in a quick oven. Serve with sweet sauce poured round them.

PRUNE LOAF

Boil a pound of prunes, with half a pint of port wine, nearly as much water, and a table-spoonful of brown sugar; stone the prunes; cut some thin bits of bread into round forms, the size of half-a-crown, or into strips about an inch wide; soak them in clarified butter, and line a shape with them, and then add the prunes and a little marmalade; put over this a layer of bread, and tie a piece of buttered paper over the shape, and bake the loaf for one hour in a moderate oven.

ANOTHER PRUNE LOAF.

Stone one pound of prunes; blanch the kernels, and boil them with the fruit, a little water, two or three spoonfuls of port wine, half an ounce of dissolved isinglass, and a table-spoonful of brown sugar. Put it into a shape, and when cold turn it out.

CARROT PUDDING.

Pound in a mortar the red part of two large boiled carrots, and a slice of grated bread, or a pounded biscuit, two ounces of melted butter, the same quantity of sugar, a table-spoonful of marmalade, or a bit of orange-peel minced; half a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, and four well-beaten eggs; mix all well together; bake it in a dish lined with puff paste.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CARROT PUDDING.

The red part of two pounds of carrots grated, half a pound of grated bread, five well-beaten eggs, half a pound of fresh butter beaten to a cream, a quarter of a pound of sugar, half a pint of cream, a glass of brandy or white wine, two table-spoonfuls of orange-flower water; mix all these ingredients well together, and bake it in a dish lined with puff paste; turn it out to serve, and strew pounded sugar over the top.

GOOSEBERRY PUDDING.

Scald a quart of gooseberries, and when tender, rub them through a sieve; sweeten them well with brown sugar; melt six ounces of butter in a quarter of a pint of cream; beat the yolks of eight, and the whites of four eggs; grate half the peel of a lemon: mix all well together, adding one spoonful of orange-flower water, and bake it in a dish lined with puff paste. Put grated sugar over it before serving.

A PUDDING.

Sweeten a pint and a half of cream, and boil it with the peel of a small lemon; cut the crumb of a twopenny roll, put it into the cream, and boil it for eight minutes, stirring constantly; when thick, add a quarter of a pound of fresh butter beaten to a cream, a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, and four well-beaten eggs; beat it all well together for some minutes. It may be baked or boiled.

A VOLDRON.

Melt eleven ounces of fresh butter in a brass pan, and when quite hot, add the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, and eight well-beaten eggs; stir constantly for six or eight minutes, and put it into a dish; the following day, mix with it a wine glass of orange-flower water; of citron, orange, and lemon-peel, cut fine, half a pound; butter a pudding dish, and lay into the bottom a sheet of white paper buttered, then put in the voldron, and bake it for twenty minutes; turn it out, ornament it with cut citron and orange-peel, and serve it in a silver or glass dish.

TRANSPARENT PUDDING.

Put into a sauce-pan half a pound of fresh butter, the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, and eight well-beaten eggs; stir it over the fire till of the thickness of buttered eggs, put it into a basin to cool, and mix with it a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg; bake it in a dish lined with puff paste. Before serving, grate loaf sugar over the top.

GERMAN PUFFS.

Mix very well with two large table-spoonful of flour, a quarter of a pint of cream, two well-beaten eggs, half a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, a very little salt, and one ounce of butter beaten to a cream; bake it in buttered cups for twenty or thirty minutes; turn them out upon a dish, and serve them instantly; pour a sweet sauce round them.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE GERMAN PUFFS.

Beat to a cream a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; blanch and pound one ounce of sweet almonds with a little rose water; beat the yolks of five, and the whites of three eggs: mix all together with two large table-spoonfuls of flour, and sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar; bake it in buttered cups, and serve them with a sweet sauce.

IRISH PUFFS.

Add to the well-beaten yolks of five, and the whites of two eggs, a large table-spoonful of flour, not quite an ounce of melted butter, and half a tea-spoonful of salt; beat it all well for ten minutes, and add half a pint of cream; bake it in buttered tea-cups; turn them out, and serve them with a sweet sauce.

CITRON PUDDING.

Mix together one pint of cream, one large spoonful of flour, four ounces of pounded loaf sugar, half a grated nutmeg, the beaten yolks of four eggs, and three ounces of citron cut very small; bake it in a dish lined with puff paste.

RICH GROUND-RICE PUDDING.

Stir into a quarter of a pound of ground rice, a pint and a half of new milk; put it into a sauce-pan, and keep stirring it till it boils; then add three ounces of melted butter, the same quantity of sugar, half a grated nutmeg, and a tea-spoonful of grated lemon-peel; mix it very well, and when cold, add the well-beaten yolks of four, and the white of one egg, with a glass of ratafia, and half a one of orange-flower or rose water; bake it in a dish lined with puff paste for three quarters of an hour. Before serving, strew over the top grated loaf sugar.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE GROUND-RICE PUDDING.

Mix till quite smooth, with a small tea-cupful of ground rice, a quart of good milk; stir it over the fire till it boils, and let it boil for three minutes; put it into a basin, and when nearly cold, add the well-beaten yolks of six, and the whites of two eggs, with a tea-cupful of sweet wine, or a glass of spirits; put it into a buttered dish, and bake it for three quarters of an hour, or for one hour, in a Dutch oven, in the same way as the marrow pudding is done. (see below) Any sort of preserve may be put into the bottom of the dish, and a sweet sauce may be served with it.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE GROUND-RICE PUDDING.

Mix a quarter of a pound of ground rice with rather more than a pint of milk; stir it till it boils; add a quarter of a pound of butter, and when nearly cold, sweeten it, and add the well-beaten yolks of five, and the whites of three eggs, two spoonfuls of orange-flower water, and a little grated nutmeg. Bake it in a Dutch oven; or it may be boiled half an hour.

RICH PUDDING.

Put into a sauce-pan four ounces of fresh butter, six ounces of pounded loaf sugar, six of marmalade, and six ounces of eggs, well beaten; stir all one way till it be thoroughly warmed – it must not be allowed to boil. Bake it in a dish lined with puff paste.

BUTTER-MILK PUDDING.

Turn two quarts of new milk with one of butter-milk; drain off the whey, and mix with the curd the grated crumb of a twopenny roll, the grated peel of a lemon, nearly a whole nutmeg grated, half a pint of rich cream, six ounces of clarified butter, and the beaten yolks of nine, and the whites of four eggs; sweeten it well, and bake it, with or without a puff paste, for three quarters of an hour. It may be boiled.

MARROW PUDDING.

Put into a mug the crumb of a twopenny loaf, and pour over it a pint and a half of boiling milk; cover it closely for an hour; cut into small bits half a pound of marrow, stone and cut a quarter of a pound of raisins, take the same quantity of nicely-cleaned currants, beat well six eggs,  tea-spoonful of grated lemon-peel, and the same of nutmeg; mix all thoroughly with the bread and milk, sweeten it well with brown sugar, and bake it, with or without a border of puff paste round the dish, three quarters of an hour. It may be baked in a Dutch oven, and after baking in it for three quarters of an hour, put a tin cover over the top, and place the dish upon a gridiron, over a slow fire, and let it remain for fifteen minutes.

RATAFIA PUDDING.

Pound, with a little rose water, two ounces of blanched sweet almonds, and a half a quarter of a pound of ratafia cakes; add the well-beaten yolks of six, and the whites of two eggs, a pint of thick cream, two glasses of white wine, and one ounce of pounded loaf sugar. Bake it in a dish, lined with puff paste, for three quarters of an hour.

WHOLE RICE PUDDING.

Boil, in one pint and a half of water, till it be swelled, twelve dessert-spoonfuls of whole rice, with two table-spoonfuls of minced suet, and four of cleaned currants; then add two table-spoonfuls of grated bread, six of brown sugar, two well-beaten eggs, a quart of warm milk, a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, and one of ginger. Bake it in a buttered dish. It may be baked in a Dutch oven. Half the quantity will make a pudding for a small family.

WHOLE RICE PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS.

Weigh six ounces of rice, six of brown sugar, and three and a half of fresh butter; break the butter into small bits; wash the rice in several waters; put all into a pudding-dish, and fill it up with good milk; let it soak some hours. Bake it in a moderate oven for nearly two hours, and as the milk wastes, fill up the dish with more, till the rice be swelled and soft; then let it brown.

BAKED HASTY PUDDING.

Boil two ounces of flour in a pint of milk; stir it till it be thick and stiff; put it into a basin, and add half an ounce of butter and a little nutmeg, with sugar sufficient to sweeten it. When cold, mix in three well-beaten eggs; line a dish with thin paste, and in the bottom of it put a layer of orange marmalade, or any other preserve, and bake the pudding in a moderate oven for half an hour. It is very good without the paste, and may be baked in a Dutch oven.

NASSAU PUDDING.

Put into a sauce-pan the whole yolks of eight, and the whites of four eggs, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and one pound of fresh butter; stir it over a slow fire for nearly half an hour; line a dish with thin puff paste, lay over the bottom a thick layer of orange marmalade, and then put in the pudding. Bake it for fifteen or twenty minutes.

MACARONI PUDDING.

Boil a quarter of a pound of macaroni in a pint of good milk; when quite tender, sweeten it with brown sugar, and add two well-beaten eggs, and three table-spoonfuls more of milk. Put it into a pudding-dish, and bake it in a Dutch oven for half an hour.

POTATO OR CARROT PUDDING.

Weigh half a pound of boiled potatoes, or of boiled carrots, and pound them in a mortar; blanch one ounce of sweet almonds; pound them, but not finely, with a little orange-flower water; add the well-beaten whites of two, and the yolks of four eggs, a little salt, grated nutmeg, and one or two table-spoonfuls of brown sugar; mix all well together. Line the dish with puff paste, and just before putting the pudding into the oven, stir in half a pound of melted butter. Bake it for twenty minutes.

POTATO PUDDING.

Boil and peel half a pound of potatoes; pound them in a mortar, with six ounces of fresh butter, then add the well-beaten yolks of six, and the whites of three eggs, six ounces of pounded loaf sugar, half a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, the same of pounded cinnamon, and a glass of spirits. Bake it in a buttered dish; turn it out before serving, and strew over it grated loaf sugar. A sweet sauce may be served with it.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE POTATO PUDDING.

Boil three large mealy potatoes, mash them very smoothly, with one ounce of butter, and two or three table-spoonfuls of thick cream; add three well-beaten eggs, a little salt, grated nutmeg, and a table-spoonful of brown sugar. Beat all well together, and bake it, in a buttered dish, for half an hour in an oven, and three quarters in a Dutch oven. A few currants may be added to the pudding.

TANSY PUDDING.

Pour a quart of boiling milk over a thick slice of the crumb of bread; cover it till cold. Beat the yolks of six, and the white of two eggs. Pound some tansy with two or three leaves of spinach; squeeze the juice, and put in as much of it as will make the pudding of a good green colour, a glass of brandy, half a grated nutmeg, and four ounces of fresh butter; mix all the ingredients, sweeten and put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it over the fire till it be hot. Bake it in a buttered dish for half an hour. Before serving, strew grated loaf sugar over the top.

CHARLOTTE DE POMMES.

Pare, core, and mince fourteen or fifteen French rennet apples; put them into a frying-pan, with some pounded loaf sugar, a little pounded cinnamon, grated lemon-peel, and two ounces and a half of fresh butter; fry them a quarter of an hour over a quick fire, stirring them constantly. Butter a shape of the size the charlotte is intended to be; cut strips of bread about the width of two fingers, and long enough to reach from the bottom to the rim of the shape, so that the whole be lined with bread; dip each bit into melted butter, and then put a layer of the fried apples, and one of apricot jam or marmalade, and then one of bread dipped into butter; begin and finish with it. Bake it in an oven for nearly an hour; turn it out to serve it. It may be boiled, and served with a sweet sauce.

SPEAKER’S PUDDING.

Stone and weigh three quarters of a pound of raisins. Rub with butter a plain oval mould, and stick upon it some of the raisins, in strips or circles. Cut some thin slices of bread without the crust, dry them a while before the fire, butter, and cut them into strips about an inch and a quarter wide; line the mould with part of the bread; then put a layer of raisins, and strew over them a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar; add a layer of the bread and butter; then raisins, and so on till the shape be nearly full, putting bread and butter on the top. Mix with a pint of good milk, the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, a table-spoonful of sugar, one and a half of rose water, and a glass of brandy; pour this over the pudding, and let it soak one or two hours. Bake it three quarters of an hour. It may be boiled by steam for an hour and a half.

ALMOND PUDDING.

Blanch eight bitter, and half a pound of sweet almonds; pound them in a mortar, with a glass of orange-flower water, and one of brandy. Soak, in a pint and a half of rich cream, four ounces of pounded biscuit; melt four ounces of butter; beat, till very light, the yolks of seven eggs, with half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and a tea-spoonful of grated lemon-peel. Mix all well together, and stir it over the fire till it be thoroughly heated, but not allowed to boil. Bake it in a dish lined with puff paste for half an hour.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ALMOND PUDDING.

Pound, with orange-flower or rose water, half a pound of blanched sweet almonds; add a small tea-cupful of white wine, a quarter of a pound of melted butter, the same of pounded loaf sugar, four well-beaten eggs, a pint of cream, a tea-spoonfuls of grated lemon-peel and nutmeg, and two table-spoonfuls of grated bread. Mix all well, and bake it in a dish with lined puff paste.

CUSTARD PUDDING.

Mix, with one table-spoonful of flour, a pint of cream or new milk, the well-beaten yolks of six eggs, a spoonful of rose water, one of brandy, one ounce of fresh butter broken into small bits; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and add a little grated nutmeg. Bake it in a dish lined with puff paste, for half an hour. Before serving, strew over it pounded loaf sugar, and stick over it thin cut bits of citron.

LIGHT PUDDINGS.

Mix, with two ounces of flour, half a pint of cream, four well-beaten eggs, and two ounces of clarified butter; half fill buttered cups, and bake them nearly half an hour. Serve them turned out upon a dish, with a sweet sauce poured into it.

VERMICELLI PUDDING.

Wash three ounces of vermicelli; boil it for fifteen minutes in a pint of milk, with a bit of cinnamon and lemon-peel. When nearly cold, pick out the cinnamon and peel, sweeten it, and add the well-beaten yolks of six, and the whites of two eggs. Mix it well, and bake it in a buttered dish for half an hour.

It may be boiled for one hour and a half, and served with a sweet sauce.

CHOUS.

Stir into a pint of boiling water half a pound of butter, and add by degrees the same quantity of flour; stir it constantly till quite smooth, and then add eight eggs well beaten, with half a tea-spoonful of salt, and a wine-glass of orange-flower water; take it off the fire, and beat it for a few minutes; then with a spoon form it into small balls, place them in rows upon a floured tin, and bake them in a moderate oven for a quarter of an hour. Serve them with grated loaf sugar sifted over them.

ARROW-ROOT PUDDING.

From a quart of new milk take a small tea-cupful, and mix it with two large spoonfuls of arrow-root. Boil the remainder of the milk, and stir it amongst the arrow-root; add, when nearly cold, the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, with two ounces of pounded loaf sugar, and the same quantity of fresh butter broken into small bits; season with grated nutmeg. Mix it well together, and bake it in a butter dish fifteen or twenty minutes.

SCOTCH PUDDING.

The yolks of eight, and the whites of three well-beaten eggs, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, a quarter of a pound of melted butter, two table-spoonfuls of sifted ground rice, the grated peel and juice of one lemon: mix all together, and bake it in a dish lined with puff paste; turn it out to serve, and strew over the top grated loaf sugar.

POTATO-FLOUR PUDDING.

Boil some cinnamon, lemon-peel, and sugar, in a quart of milk; strain, and stir it with three table-spoonfuls of potato flour previously mixed smooth with a little cold milk; stir it till it be nearly cold; add four well-beaten eggs, a glass of sweet wine, or two table-spoonfuls of spirits, and a little marmalade. Bake it in a Dutch oven.

POTATO FLOUR, OR STARCH.

Wash some large mealy potatoes; peel, and throw them into a deep pan of cold water, in which grate them down upon a bread grater; then strain the mass through a hair sieve; let it settle for ten or fifteen minutes, pour off the water, put on fresh, stir it up, and again let it settle for half an hour or longer; repeat this until the water be perfectly clear, and the powder blanched of a pure white. Lay a linen cloth upon a riddle, put the flour upon it, and dry it in the sun or before the fire; turn, and stir it frequently; or it may be dried upon large flat dishes. Put it into jar, and tie paper over them. The potato which has a yellow tint yields the best flower, and most abundantly in October and March.

PLUM PUDDING.

Take one pound of fresh beef suet, very finely minced, one pound of good raisins stoned and chopped, one pound of currants nicely cleaned and dried, one pound of flour, the grated peel of one lemon, and half a large nutmeg, six well-beaten eggs, one ounce of candied orange, and half a one of candied lemon-peel minced, half a pound of brown sugar, one glass of brandy, and a tea-cupful of cream; mix all the ingredients well with flour; boil it in a cloth, put it on in a copper of boiling water, and keep it boiling for seven hours. Before serving, strew grated loaf sugar over it. Sauces: - Half a pint of white wine, three table-spoonfuls of water, three or four of pounded loaf sugar, and one ounce of butter, stirred till boiling hot; and plain melted butter, sweetened with sugar. Brown sugar and currant wine may be used for the sauce.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE PLUM PUDDING.

One pound of the best raisins stoned, half a pound of currants well cleaned, one pound of fresh beef suet finely minced, five table-spoonfuls of grated bread, three of flour, two of brown sugar, one tea-spoonful of pounded ginger, one of cinnamon, and one of salt, six well-beaten eggs, and three wine-glasses of rum, all to be mixed thoroughly together the day before it is to be boiled. Boil it in a cloth or mould for four or five hours. Serve with melted butter or the following sauce: - Heat two or three table-spoonfuls of sweet cream, and mix it gradually with the well-beaten yolks of two eggs; add three table-spoonfuls of white wine, brandy, or rum, and a table-spoonful of sugar; season with grated nutmeg, and stir it over the fie till quite hot, but do not allow it to boil.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE PLUM PUDDING.

Half a pound of raisins stoned, the same of currants cleaned, six ounces of minced suet, three table-spoonfuls of flour, the same of grated bread, five ounces of brown sugar, eight well-beaten eggs, three cloves pounded, half a tea-spoonful of Jamaica-pepper ground, a small grated nutmeg, a little salt, and a glass of brandy; mix it all extremely well, and boil it for three or four hours. Serve with wine and sugar sauce.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE PLUM PUDDING.

One pound of fresh beef suet finely minced, one pound of raisins stoned, five table-spoonfuls of flour, five of brown sugar, the yolks of five, and the whites of three well-beaten eggs, a tea-spoonful of salt; mix all the ingredients thoroughly, and boil it in a cloth for four or five hours. Serve with grated loaf sugar, and melted butter poured over it.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE PLUM PUDDING.

Four ounces of apples finely minced, the same quantity of currants cleaned and dried, and of grated bread, two ounces of raisins, stoned and minced, two of pounded loaf sugar, half a nutmeg grated, a little candied orange or lemon-peel, four well-beaten eggs, one ounce and a half of melted butter just warm; mix all the ingredients well together, and boil it in a buttered shape for four hours. If the pudding does not fill the shape, add a slice of the crumb of bread at the bottom. Serve with a sweet sauce.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE PLUM PUDDING.

One pound of the finest raisins stoned, three quarters of a pound of beef-suet finely minced, two table-spoonfuls of flour, four of brown sugar, seven well-beaten eggs, a nutmeg grated, a little pounded cinnamon, and half a pint of brandy; mix it all well together, and boil it in a cloth for five hours.

PLUM PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS.

Half a pound of grated bread, a quarter of a pound of finely-minced suet, a table-spoonful of flour, half a pound of currants cleaned, rather more than two ounces of brown sugar, and a glass of brandy; mix all together with a sufficient quantity of milk to make it into a stiff batter; boil it in a cloth for four hours. It may be baked, adding half a pound of stoned raisins, and a little candied orange and lemon-peel.

TREACLE PUDDING.

Half a pound of flour, the same of finely-minced suet; of raisins stoned, and cut small, and well-cleaned currants, a quarter of a pound each, three table-spoonfuls of treacle, and half a pint of water:  mix it all well together; boil it in a cloth for four hours, and serve it with a sweet sauce.

JENETON PUDDING.

Butter a mould, and ornament it with dried cherries or raisins in festoons, or in any other form; line it with spunge biscuit, and fill it up with a mixture of ratafia and spunge biscuit; then pour a rich custard over the whole, and let it stand for two hours, adding more custard as it soaks into the biscuit. The mould being quite full, tie a cloth over it, and boil it for about an hour.

BATTER PUDDING.

Beat seven eggs for fifteen or twenty minutes; mix with six large table-spoonfuls of flour a quart of new milk, and add the eggs, with a little salt; stir it well together, and let it stand an hour or two; lay a buttered and floured pudding-cloth into a basin, pour in the batter, tie it tightly, and boil it for an hour and a half.

It may be boiled in a mould. Serve it with the following sauce: - Dredge a large table-spoonful of butter with flour; melt it with a little water; add a large tea-cupful of currant wine, well sweetened with brown sugar, and the well-beaten yolks of two eggs; stir it constantly till it be thoroughly heated, but take care it does not boil; pounded cinnamon, or grated nutmeg, may be added.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BATTER PUDDING.

Beat the yolks of four, and the whites of three eggs, for a quarter of an hour; mix gradually with five table-spoonfuls of flour, a pint of good milk, and half a tea-spoonful of salt; add the eggs, and beat it well; boil it in a cloth for one hour. Serve it with the following sweet sauce: - Two glasses of white or sweet wine, one of water, three table-spoonfuls of sugar, and a bit of butter the size of a large walnut; stir it till it boil.

MUFFIN PUDDING.

Pare off the crust of two muffins, split and halve them; put into a tin shape a layer of any sort of preserves, - apricot is the best, - then a layer of muffin, next one of fruit, and then the remainder of the muffin, and pour over it a pint of warm milk, in which four well-beaten eggs have been mixed. Cover the shape, and place it in a sauce-pan with a small quantity of boiling water. Keep on the cover, and let it boil twenty minutes; turn it out, and serve it with pudding sauce.

Light white bread, cut thin, may be substituted for the muffins. The pudding will be better if prepared three or four hours before it is boiled.

ARDOVIE PUDDING.

Mix two table-spoonfuls of ground rice with a quart of milk; stir it over the fire till it boils, and then add five well-beaten eggs and a little salt; pour the mixture into a basin rubbed with butter; place it in a steam sauce-pan of boiling water, and let it steam two hours; then put the basin into a Dutch oven, and let it stand a quarter of an hour to firm the pudding, but it must be browned; turn it out, and pour over it the following sauce: - Add half a pint of cream to the beaten yolk of an egg; stir it over the fire till it thickens; take if off for a little, then mix in a quarter of a pint of white wine and three ounces of sugar; stir it again over the fire.

GROUND-RICE PUDDING.

Boil in a pint of milk a quarter of a pound of flour of rice, with two table-spoonfuls of rose water, and half the peel of a lemon; stir it till thick, take it off, and mix in a quarter of a pound of butter, half a grated nutmeg, the well-beaten yolks of four, and the whites of three eggs; sweeten it with brown sugar, pick out the lemon-peel, and boil it in a buttered basin, which must be completely filled. Serve with a sauce made with a glass of white wine, boiled in melted butter, and sweetened with brown sugar.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE GROUND-RICE PUDDING.

Stir into a quart of boiling milk a breakfast-cupful of ground rice, and a few pounded bitter almonds; when quite thick, take it off, and add eight well-beaten eggs, sweeten it, and again stir it over the fire till it boil, and then put it into an earthenware mould, and let it stand before the fire a few minutes before turning it out. Serve it with pounded cinnamon strewed over it, and a sauce of melted butter, wine, and sugar, poured round it.

WILTSHIRE PUDDING.

Mix, with three well-beaten eggs, a pint of milk, as much flour as will make it a thick batter, and a little salt; beat it for some minutes; stir in gently a large tea-cupful of picked red currants, and half that quantity of red raspberries; boil it in a cloth for two hours; turn it out upon the dish it is to be served in; cut it into slices about three quarters of an inch thick, but do not separate them; put between each a thin slice of butter, and some brown sugar, and serve it hot, with pudding sauce in a sauce-tureen. It is very good without the raspberries.

TEALING PUDDING.

Whisk together for ten minutes eight eggs, some sugar, nutmeg, ginger, and the grated peel of a lemon; stir in three spoonfuls of flour, and a quart of milk which has been allowed just to boil; dip a cloth into boiling water, dust it with flour, tie the mixture into it, and boil it for an hour. Serve with pudding sauce.

MIDDLETON PUDDING.

Beat together ten eggs, five spoonfuls of flour, a pint of new milk, a table-spoonful of brown sugar, a little nutmeg, and a pinch of salt; tie it loosely in a cloth, and boil for two hours. Serve it with pudding sauce.

BREAD PUDDING.

Boil the grated peel of a Seville orange in a pint of milk, and pour it over the sliced crumb of a twopenny roll; cover it closely for an hour; beat the yolks of three, and the whites of two eggs; mix them with the bread and milk, and beat it for ten minutes; sweeten and boil it in a buttered basin for an hour. Serve with a sauce of melted butter and sugar.

FAMILY PUDDING.

Mix with a pound of flour half a pound of raisins stoned and chopped, the same quantity of minced suet, a little salt, and milk or water sufficient to make it into a stiff batter; boil it for five hours. Serve it with melted butter poured over it. Two well-beaten eggs may be added.

HALF-HOUR DUMPLINGS.

Mince finely half a pound of suet; mix it with the same proportion of grated bread, and a table-spoonful of flour, a quarter of a pound of currants, some sugar, a little grated lemon-peel, nutmeg, and three well-beaten eggs; roll the mixture into round balls, tie them in bits of linen, and boil them for half an hour. Serve with melted butter and sugar poured over them.

SHROPSHIRE PUDDING.

Of fresh beef suet finely minced, of brown bread grated, and of brown sugar, one pound each; one nutmeg grated, a tea-cupful of brandy, the well-beaten yolks of eight, and the whites of four eggs: mix all well together, and boil it in a cloth or mould for four hours. Serve it with a sauce of melted butter, sugar, and two table-spoonfuls of brandy.

APPLE PUDDING.

Weigh one pound and three quarters of apples, pare, core, and cut them into thin bits; weigh also ten ounces of brown sugar; make a suet paste, rolled thinner towards the edges than in the middle, and sufficiently large to lay into a two-quart basin, previously buttered; put in the apples and sugar alternately, wet the edges of the paste, and fold it closely over; dredge it with flour, and tie a pudding-cloth over the top of the basin; boil it for three hours.

WEST COUNTRY PUDDING.

Mix, with four well-beaten eggs, half a pound of apples, finely minced, the same quantity of grated bread and of well-cleaned currants, a quarter of a pound of brown sugar, and half a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg. This pudding may be either boiled or baked, and, instead of grated bread, four ounces of whole rice may be used, which must be boiled in milk, strained, and allowed to be cold before being mixed with the other ingredients. This pudding is boiled one hour and a half, and served with a sweet sauce.

PRUNE PUDDING.

Stew a pound of prunes with half a pint of port wine, a quarter of a pint of water, and a large table-spoonful of brown sugar; break the stones, and put the kernels, with the fruit; spread it over a sheet of puff paste, wet the edges, and roll it into the form of a bolster; tie it firmly in a buttered and floured cloth, and boil it between two and three hours. Serve with a sweet wine sauce.

DAMSON PUDDING.

Make a batter with three well-beaten eggs, a pint of milk, and of flour and brown sugar four table-spoonfuls each; stone a pint of damsons, and mix them with the batter; boil it in a buttered basin for an hour and a half.

APPLE DUMPLINGS.

Pare and scoop out the core of six large baking apples; put part of a clove, and a little grated lemon-peel, inside of each, and enclose them in pieces of puff paste; boil them in nets for the purpose, or bits of linen, for an hour. Before serving, cut off a small bit from the top of each, and put in a tea-spoonful of sugar, and a bit of fresh butter; replace the bit of paste, and strew over them pounded loaf sugar.

POTATO-FLOUR PUDDING.

Boil half a pint of milk, and the same quantity of cream, with a stick of cinnamon, and the peel of a lemon; strain it, and stir in gradually three table-spoonfuls of potato flour; mix it very smoothly, and add six well-beaten eggs; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar. Stick all round a buttered tin mould, dried cherries, or stoned raisins; put in the pudding, and put a bit of buttered linen over the top, and then the cover of the mould; place it in a sauce-pan of boiling water, boil it for an hour and a half, taking care the water does not boil over the mould. Serve with a sweet sauce. 

POTATO PUDDING.

Boil a pound of potatoes; peel and pound them in a mortar, and mix them well with half a pound of melted butter, the same of pounded loaf sugar, two ounces of blanched sweet almonds pounded, with two spoonfuls of rose water, eight well-beaten eggs, and half a nutmeg grated; boil it in a cloth, or buttered basin. Serve with a sweet sauce of wine, sugar, butter, and grated nutmeg.

RICE PUDDING.

Boil a quarter of a pound of rice in water till it is soft, then drain it in a sieve, and pound it in a mortar; add five well-beaten yolks of eggs, a quarter of a pound of butter, the same proportion of sugar, a small nutmeg, and half the rind of a lemon grated; work them well together for twenty minutes, and add a pound of cleaned currants; mix it all well, and boil it in a pudding-cloth for an hour and a half. Serve with wine sauce.

WHOLE RICE PUDDING.

Boil, in water sufficient to cover it, eight table-spoonfuls of rice till quite swelled; put it into a basin; stir in about two ounces of butter, of grated bread and brown sugar two table-spoonfuls each, two well-beaten eggs, a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, half a one of pounded ginger, and enough of milk to make the whole fill a quart basin, which may be about a pint – the basin must be buttered, and a piece of buttered paper put under the cloth; boil it for an hour, and serve with a sweet sauce. Half this quantity may be used.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE WHOLE RICE PUDDING.

Wash in several waters a quarter of a pound of rice; put it into a sauce-pan with one ounce of fresh butter, and a sufficiency of water to cover it; stir it frequently till it becomes thick; add six well-beaten eggs, a few pounded bitter almonds, a tea-spoonful of pounded cinnamon, and a glass of rum; sweeten and boil it in a cloth for one hour. Serve it with a sweet sauce.

AMERICAN SNOW BALLS.

Boil some rice in milk till it be swelled and soft; pare and carefully scoop out the core of five or six good-sized apples; put into each a little grated lemon-peel and cinnamon; place as much of the rice upon a bit of linen as will entirely cover an apple, and tie each closely. Boil them two hours, and serve them with melted butter, sweetened with sugar.

AUNT MARY’S PUDDING.

Of bloom raisins stoned, currants nicely cleaned, suet finely minced, bread grated, apples minced, and brown sugar, a quarter of a pound of each; four well-beaten eggs, a tea-spoonful of pounded ginger, half a one of salt, half a nutmeg grated, and one glass of brandy; mix all the ingredients well, and boil it in a cloth for two hours. Serve with a sauce of melted butter, a glass of wine, and some sugar.

CUSTARD PUDDING.

Mix with a pint of cream or milk six well-beaten eggs, two table-spoonful of flour, half a small nutmeg grated, or an equal quantity of pounded cinnamon, a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar, and a little salt; boil it in a cloth, or buttered basin that will exactly hold it, for half an hour. Or, boil in a quart of milk a bit of cinnamon, lemon-peel, and grated nutmeg; when nearly cold, strain and mix it with the beaten yolks of six, and the whites of four eggs, and boil it half an hour. Serve with wine sauce.

SUET PUDDING.

Mix six table-spoonfuls of grated bread with a pound of finely-minced fresh beef suet, or that of a loin of mutton, one pound of flour, two tea-spoonfuls of salt, six well-beaten eggs, and nearly a pint of milk. Boil it in a cloth, four or five hours. Serve it plain, or with a sweet sauce.

COOKE’S SUET PUDDING WITHOUT SUET.

Mix well together a tea-cupful of cream, half a one of milk, two well-beaten eggs, and nearly a pint of milk. Boil it in a cloth, four or five hours. Serve it plain, or with a sweet sauce.

IRISH BLACK PUDDING.

Blanch and pound to a paste, with a glass of rose water, a quarter of a pound of sweet almonds; grate half a pound of the crumb of bread; mince one pound of fresh suet; add half a pound of cleaned currants, a tea-spoonful of pounded cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves, a pint of cream, the well-beaten yolks of four, and whites of two eggs, a glass of brandy, and some candied lemon-peel; mix all the ingredients well together; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and boil it in a cloth, and when cold, cut it into thick slices; heat it in a Dutch oven, or broil it upon a gridiron.

A PUDDING.

Eight ounces of grated bread, three of finely-minced suet, four of pounded loaf sugar, the juice and grated peel of two lemons, and one well-beaten egg; mix all together, and boil it in a cloth or buttered basin for one hour. Serve with a sweet sauce.

DUTCH PUDDING.

With a pint and a half of milk, mix eight spoonfuls of flour, six well-beaten eggs, half a tea-spoonful of salt, the same quantity of pounded ginger, and two tea-spoonfuls of sugar. Boil it in a cloth for an hour and a half. Serve with melted butter sweetened with sugar.

WHITE PUDDING.

Boil in a quart of milk two table-spoonfuls of flour, and a little salt; stir it into the milk, and if not thick, dredge in a little more flour; just before it is taken off the fire, put in a bit of fresh butter the size of a walnut. Serve it with red currant jelly upon the top of it.

CALF’S-FEET PUDDING.

Pick all the meat off three well-boiled calf’s feet; chop it finely, as also half a pound of fresh beef suet; grate the crumb of a penny loaf; cut like straws an ounce of orange-peel, and the same of citron; beat well six eggs, and grate a small nutmeg; mix all these ingredients well together, with a glass of brandy or rum, and boil it in a cloth nearly three hours. Serve with a sweet sauce.

SUET APPLE PUDDING.

Of finely-minced fresh mutton suet, grated apples, flour, and brown sugar, six ounces each; half a grated nutmeg, a tea-spoonful of salt, and four well-beaten eggs, all well mixed together; boiled for two hours; and served with a sweet sauce.

FRUIT SUET PUDDING.

Of finely-minced suet, flour, grated bread, and cleaned currants, a quarter of a pound each; a tea-spoonful of pounded ginger, one of salt, two ounces of brown sugar, and a tea-cupful of milk; mix all the ingredients well together, and boil it in a cloth for two hours. Serve with a sweet sauce.

REGENT’S PUDDING.

Rub an eartherware mould with butter, and cover the bottom with bloom raisins stoned; cut thin slices of the crumb of bread; butter, and lay one or two over the raisins; upon that put a layer of ratafia cakes, then one of bread and butter, and raisins; do this till the mould is nearly full, and pour over it the following mixture: - A pint of cream, well-sweetened with pounded loaf sugar, and mixed with four well-beaten yolks of eggs, a glass of brandy, and two table-spoonfuls of rose water; let it soak one or two hours, put over the top a piece of writing paper buttered, and tie over it a cloth. Boil it for one hour and a half, and serve it with wine sauce.  

STIRRED-IN GOOSEBERRY PUDDING.

Rub into six ounces of flour a quarter of a pound of finely-minced mutton suet; put it into a basin with half a tea-spoonful of salt, four or five table-spoonfuls of brown sugar, two well-beaten eggs, and a gill of milk; stir in a pint, or a pint and a half, of gooseberries; butter a basin, that will exactly contain it, and boil it for two hours. Serve with a sauce of butter melted with milk, and well sweetened with brown sugar.

OXFORD PUDDING. 

Boil some water in a sauce-pan with a little salt, and stir oatmeal into it with a thevil; when of a proper thickness, let it boil for four or five minutes, stirring it all the time; then pour it into a dish, and serve it with cream or milk. It is sometimes eaten with porter and sugar, or ale and sugar.

If made with milk instead of water, less meal is requisite, and it is then eaten with cold milk.

SOWENS.

Half-fill a tub, large jar, or any other vessel, with oatmeal seeds, and fill it up with milk-warm water. Let it stand till it get a little sour, which in warm weather may be in three or four day; then strain it through a cheese-drainer, squeezing the seeds, and adding to them a little cold water, to obtain all the substance from them; the liquid is allowed to stand a little, till the thick matter falls to the bottom, the thin is then poured off, and fresh cold water added, stirring it well, The sowens, being thus prepared for boiling, will keep a week or more in cold weather; and when too sour for use, a little may be mixed with the next making, by which means it well be sooner ready. When to be dressed, pour off some of the water from the top, stir it up from the bottom, and boil the portions required, add a little salt, and stirring it all the time it is upon the fire. It will take from ten to twenty minutes to thicken, when it is poured into a deep dish, and milk served with it.

ALE BERRY.

Stir into a bottle of cold beer a handful of oatmeal; put it on the fire, and stir it till it thickens like porridge, which may be in five minutes after it boils. It is served in a deep dish, and eaten with sugar.

This, and the preceding preparations of oatmeal, may be found useful for children, and an acceptable variety to those for whom a low diet is prescribed.

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING.

Butter a mould; lay into the bottom thin-cut bread and butter, with the crust pared off; strew over it a layer of currants and stoned raisins, mixed; half fill the shape, and add half a pint if brandy or rum – or currant wine may be used; in an hour, pour over it a pint of good milk, mixed with six well-beaten eggs, half a nutmeg grated, and some brown sugar; boil it for one hour and a half, and serve it with melted butter, currant wine, and sugar.

YORKSHIRE PUDDING.

Mix, with five table-spoonfuls of flour, a tea-spoonful of salt, one pint of good milk, and three well-beaten eggs; butter a square tin pan, put in the batter, and set the tin upon a gridiron for a few minutes, and then place it under beef that is roasting. Serve it cut into small oblong pieces.  

NEW COLLEGE PUDDINGS.

Half a pound of fresh beef suet, finely minced, the same of currants, a quarter of a pound of grated bread, and of pounded sweet biscuit, half a tea-spoonful of salt, a small nutmeg grated, an ounce of candied orange-peel minced; mix all together with two or three well-beaten eggs, and fry them in butter till of a light brown; shake the pan, and turn them frequently till done enough. Serve with pounded loaf sugar strewed thickly over them.

CROQUETTTES DE POSSES DE TERRE.

When boiled and peeled, allow four large mealy potatoes, half their weight of butter, and of pounded loaf sugar, two eggs beaten, half the grated peel of a lemon, and a little salt; pound the potatoes in a mortar with the other ingredients; beat the yolks of four eggs; roll up the croquettes; dip them into the beaten eggs; and roll them in sifted bread crumbs; in an hour, roll them again as before, and fry them in butter; put them upon the back of a sieve before the fire to drain.

COTTAGE PUDDINGS.

Six ounce of currants, half a pound of minced suet, and the same quantity of grated bread, half a grated nutmeg, a table-spoonful of white wine, or rose water; mix all well together, with the beaten yolks of five eggs, to a stiff paste, and with floured hands roll it into twelve or thirteen small puddings in the form of sausages; fry them gently in butter till of a nice brown; roll them well in the frying-pan. Serve with pounded loaf sugar strewed over them, and with a sweet sauce. They may be boiled.

PUDDING IN HASTE.

Beat separately the yolks and whites of four eggs, and with the yolks a little brown sugar, a tea-cupful of good milk, two table-spoonfuls of flour, one of rum or sweet wine; and when they are well mixed, add the beaten whites. Fry it in butter in a broad sauce-pan; brown the upper side before the fire. Serve with pounded loaf sugar strewed over, and sweet sauce.

OXFORD PUDDINGS.

Half a pound of sifted bread crumbs, the same quantity of suet and of currants finely minced, a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, some brown sugar and a little salt, a table-spoonful of rose water, one of brandy or rum; make it into a stiff paste with cream, and the beaten yolks of two eggs; roll it into balls, and fry.

POINT DE JOUR FRITTERS.

Mix with two handfuls of flour a glass of sweet wine, a table-spoonful of brandy, and warm milk, sufficient to make it into a paste; add the well-beaten whites of four eggs, a little minced citron, candied orange-peel or currants; beat it well together, and drop it through a wide tin funnel, into boiling lard. Serve with pounded loaf sugar strewed over them.

SWEETMEAT FRITTERS.

Cut small any sort of candied fruit, and heat it with a bit of fresh butter, some good milk, and a little grated lemon-peel; when quite hot, stir in enough of flour to make it into a stiff paste; take it off the fire, and work in eight or ten eggs, two at a time; when cold, form the fritters, and fry, and serve them with pounded loaf sugar strewed over them.

APPLE FRITTERS.

Stew some apples cut small, together with a little water, sugar, lemon-peel, and cinnamon; when soft, add a little white wine, and the juice of half a lemon, and a bit of fresh butter; when cold, mix them with a batter as for Tunbridge puffs, or enclose them in rounds of puff paste. Fry, and serve them with sifted loaf sugar over them.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE APPLE FRITTERS.

Four well-beaten eggs, half a pint of cream, two table-spoonfuls of yeast, three of white wine, and two of rose water; half a tea-spoonful of grated nutmeg, and of salt; make it into a thick batter with flour; peel and core two or three apples, cut them into thin bits, and mix them with the batter; cover it over, and let it stand, placed near the fire, about an hour; drop it into boiling lard, and serve them in a napkin, with sugar strewed over them. Gooseberries previously stewed may be done in the same way.

FRENCH FRITTERS.

Break three eggs into two handfuls of flour, work it well with a little milk, and half a tea-spoonful of salt, and, when well worked, add a tea-spoonful of pounded cinnamon, the grated peel of a lemon, and a little minced citron; rub a sauce-pan with butter, put in the paste, and when it becomes firm, take it out and cut it into bits of three or four inches long, and one wide; notch each bit at the ends; fry, and serve them with sifted loaf sugar over them.

ALMOND FRITTERS.

Blanch three quarters of a pound of sweet almonds; pour over them three table-spoonfuls of rose water, and in a quarter of an hour a pint of cream; let them stand two or three hours, then pound them in a mortar till they become quite a paste; add the beaten yolks of six eggs, two or three pounded Naples biscuit; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and mix all well together; melt a quarter of a pound of fresh butter in a frying-pan, and when hot, pour in the mixture, and stir it constantly till thick, and of a light brown colour. Serve it with sifted loaf sugar over the top.

CURRANT FRITTERS WITHOUT EGGS.

Stir into half a pint of mild ale, as much flour as will make it into a thick batter; add a little sugar and a few currants; beat it up quickly, and with a spoon drop it into boiling lard.

POTATO FRITTERS.

Peel, and pound in a mortar, six mealy potatoes, with a little salt, a glass of white wine, some pounded sugar, cinnamon, and an ounce of butter; roll it out with a little flour, cut them the size of a wine glass, and fry them in boiling clarified dripping. Serve with sifted loaf sugar over them.

ORANGE FRITTERS.

Beat together half a pint of cream, two beaten eggs, four spoonfuls of flour, and one of brandy. Pare off the peel very thin; cut the orange into slices, or into quarters, and fry them in butter. Serve in a napkin, with sifted loaf sugar over them.

FRIED TOASTS.

Cut the crumbs of a twopenny loaf into round or oblong pieces, nearly an inch thick, and soak them for four or five hours in a pint of cream, mixed with three well-beaten eggs, half a pint of white wine, a little grated nutmeg, and sweetened with pounded loaf sugar. Fry them in butter till of a light brown colour, and serve with wine and sugar sauce.

BONNETS.

Boil in half a pint of water, for ten minutes, a bit of cinnamon, and of lemon-peel; strain, and mix it with three table-spoonfuls of flour, and stir it over the fire for two or three minutes; add a bit of butter the size of a walnut; when cold, mix in the beaten yolks of two eggs, a little salt and pepper; beat it well, drop a dessert-spoonful of the mixture into boiling lard, then drain them upon the back of a sieve, and when served, throw over pounded loaf sugar.

Instead of the salt and pepper, a little preserve may be dropped upon each, before the sugar is thrown over.

PUFFS.

Put into a sauce-pan a pint of milk; boil it slowly, and stir in flour till it be very thick, like paste; when cold, mix with it six well-beaten eggs, a table-spoonful of sugar, half a nutmeg, and the peel of a small lemon grated, and a table-spoonful of brandy; beat it well together for fifteen minutes, and when quite light, drop it from a dessert-spoon into a pan of boiling clarified suet or lard. Serve with pounded loaf sugar strewed over them.

TUNDRIDGE PUFFS.

Put into a nicely-tinned sauce-pan a pint of milk, and when it boils, stir into it as much flour as will make it a thick batter; add three well-beaten eggs, and two or three drops of oil of cinnamon, or any other seasoning; dust a large flat plate with flour, with a spoon throw on it the batter, in the form of balls or fritters, and drop them into boiling clarified dripping or lard. Serve them with pounded loaf sugar strewed over. – The batter may be made into a pudding, adding with the eggs an ounce of salt butter. Boil, and serve it with a sweet sauce.

SPANISH PUFFS.

Put into a sauce-pan half a pint of water and a quarter of a pound of butter; stir it till it boils, and mix in four table-spoonfuls of flour; stir it well together, and add six yolks and four whites of eggs, two at a time; let it cool, and, with a dessert-spoon, drop it into boiling clarified dripping or lard.

To make ginger puffs, a tea-spoonful of pounded ginger may be added.

SNOWBALLS BOILED IN BUTTER.

Mix with six well-beaten eggs one pint and a half of sour cream, and add by degrees as much flour as will make the batter thick enough for the spoon to stand in it; sweeten it with brown sugar, and put in a few cardamoms; stir into this mixture half a pint of beer, beat it all well together, and drop it with a dessert-spoon into some boiling lard, or butter. Drain them upon a towel before the fire, and serve them in a napkin, with sugar sifted over them.

DEER HORNS.

Beat one white, and six yolks of eggs; mix them with five table-spoonfuls of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, the same quantity of sweet cream, ten sweet almonds, blanched and pounded, the grated peel of one lemon, and as much flour as will make the whole into a paste sufficiently thick to roll out. Then cut it with tins for the purpose, into the form of horns, branches, or any other shape, and throw them into boiling lard.

NUNS.

Roll puff paste about a quarter of an inch thick; cut it into rounds, or any other shape; lay upon one bit a small tea-spoonful of any sort of preserved fruit, wet the edges, and put over it another bit of paste; fry them in boiling clarified beef suet, or fresh lard; drain them upon the back of a sieve. Serve them in a napkin, and strew pounded loaf sugar over them.

NUN’S BEADS.

Pound in a mortar four ounces of good cheese, with a little salt, the beaten yolks of three eggs, and some crumbs of bread; roll them as large as walnuts, cover them with puff paste, and fry them in butter a light brown colour. Serve them in a napkin.

FINE PANCAKES.

To three table-spoonfuls of flour, add six well-beaten eggs, three table-spoonfuls of white wine, four ounces of melted butter, nearly cold, the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, half a grated nutmeg, and a pint of cream; mix it well, beating the batter for some time, and our it thin over the pan.

SCOTCH PANCAKES.

Mix with six table-spoonfuls of flour a little cream; add the beaten yolks of six eggs, and then mix in a pint of cream, the grated peel of a small lemon, a table-spoonful of pounded sugar, and a little ratafia; when the batter is very well beaten, and just before using, mix in the whites of the eggs, beaten with a knife to a stiff froth. Put a little butter or lard into the frying-pan, make it hot, pour it out, and wipe the pan with a clean cloth; put in some more butter or lard, and when hot, pour in a tea-cupful of the batter; shake it, and when firm, prick it a little with a fork, but do not turn it; hold it before the fire a minute to brown. Serve them with pounded loaf sugar strewed over them.

FRENCH PANCAKES.

Beat separately the yolks and whites of seven eggs; beat with the yolks four table-spoonfuls of pounded loaf sugar, the same quantity of flour, one pint of cream or milk, the grated peel and juice of one lemon, and two table-spoonfuls of rose water; add the beaten whites the last thing. Allow three table-spoonfuls to each pancake.

COMMON PANCAKES.

With nearly half a pound of flour, mix five well-beaten eggs, and then add, by degrees, a quart of good milk; fry them in fresh lard, and serve them with pounded loaf sugar strewed between each.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE COMMON PANCAKES.

With a pint of new milk, mix by degrees six table-spoonfuls of flour, three well-beaten eggs, and two ounces of melted butter; add a little salt, and grated nutmeg. Put a bit of butter into the frying-pan, make it hot, and pour it out; wipe the pan quite dry; put in a small bit of butter to fry the first pancake, and fry the rest without adding more butter. Serve with pounded sugar over them.

A THICK PANCAKE.

Beat separately the yolks and whites of two eggs; mix with the yolks a table-spoonful and a half of flour, a little sugar and white wine, half a pint of cream or good milk; add the whites, and fry it in a broad sauce-pan, with butter or clarified suet; brown the upper side before the fire; warm any sort of preserve, spread it upon one half, and turn the other over it, and strew upon it pounded loaf sugar.

INDIAN PANCAKE.

Add to three well-beaten eggs a pint of new milk, three table-spoonfuls of boiled rice, some sugar, and a little pounded cinnamon; mix it all well together, and fry it in butter; brown the upper side for a minutes before the fire; serve it, cut into four, with pounded sugar strewed over it.

APPLES IN PANCAKES.

Cut some apples very small; stew them with a little white wine, grated lemon-peel, pounded cinnamon, and brown sugar; mash them, and spread it over the pancakes; roll them up, and serve with sifted loaf sugar over them.

LEIPZEGER PANCAKES.

Beat well the whites of four, and the yolks of eight fresh eggs, and add, by degrees, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, a pint and a half of sweet cream just warmed, half a pound of clarified fresh butter, two table-spoonfuls of fresh yeast, and a wine-glass full of spirits of wine; then mix in as much sifted flour as will make it into a thick batter; let it rise for half an hour; roll it out thin; cut it into rounds or oblong pieces, and lay on them jam or marmalade; double them, and let them stand again to rise, and fry them in boiling fresh lard or butter.

ABERDEEN CRULLA.

Beat to a cream a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and mix with it the same quantity of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and four well-beaten eggs; add flour till thick enough to roll out; cut the paste into oblong pieces about four or five inches in length; with a paste-cutter, divide the centre into three or four strips, wet the edges, and plait one bar over the other, so as to meet in the centre; throw them into boiling lard, or clarified suet; when fried of a light brown, drain them before the fire, and serve them in a napkin, with or without grated loaf sugar strewed over them.

FRENCH SUPPER DISH.

Pare off the crust, and cut one or two slices of bread into bits of two or three inches square; fry them in butter; put them upon a hot dish, and lay upon each bit some warmed preserve; or stew for a few minutes, in sweet wine and a little sugar, some stoned bloom raisins, and put them upon and round the toast.

The preserves may be heated by placing the jars in hot water by the side of the fire.

FONDEUX.

Beat separately the yolks and whites of four eggs; add to the yolks a pint of cream, and half a pound of grated Parmesan cheese; mix in the whites of the eggs just before putting it into paper cases; or bake it in a round tin about three inches high, and before serving it, which should be instantly when taken out of the oven, put round it a sheet of white paper folded, and cut so as to form a fringe at the top. Any mild, dry cheese may be used, and butter beaten to a cream substituted for cream.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE FONDEUX.

Mix by degrees, with a quarter of a pound of flour, half a pint of cream, and half an ounce of butter; put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it over the fire till quite thick; add five yolks of eggs, well beaten, with half a pint of new milk, and two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; stir it together in a basin, and mix in lightly the five whites of eggs beaten to a thick froth; bake it in a tin, lined with puff paste, for half an hour; turn it out instantly to serve.

A soufflet pudding may be made exactly in this way, substituting sugar for the cheese.

OMELET SOUFFLET.

Beat, with the yolks of ten eggs, four table-spoonfuls of pounded sugar, and half the peel of a grated lemon; add, the instant before putting into the pan, the well-beaten whites of the eggs; fry it in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; shake it to prevent its adhering to the pan; when firm, sift grated sugar over the top, and brown it with a salamander, or hot shovel; serve it immediately when done.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE OMELET SOUFFLET.

Beat six yolks of eggs with two table-spoonfuls of sugar, one of flour, a little salt, half a wine glass of orange-flower water, or the grated peel of half a lemon; mix in the well-beaten whites the last thing; fry, and serve it with grated sugar over the top.

APPLE SOUFFLET.

Prepare apples as for baking in a pudding; put them into a deep dish, and lay upon the top, about an inch and a half thick, rice boiling in new milk with sugar; beat to a stiff froth the whites of two or three eggs, with a little sifted loaf sugar, lay it upon the rice, and bake it in an oven a light brown. Serve it instantly when done.

RICH SOUFFLET.

Soak in white wine and a little brandy, sweetened with sugar, some slices of spunge-cake; put them into a deep dish, and pour over them a rich custard; beat to a stiff froth the whites of three or four eggs, and with a table-spoon lay it over the top in heaps to look rough; brown it in a Dutch oven, and serve quickly.

RICE SOUFFLET.

Soak in half a pint of milk, for an hour, one ounce of rice, and the peel of a lemon cut thin; put it into a sauce-pan, with a little salt, and add by degrees a pint of new milk, and a bit of butter the size of a walnut; stir it till it boil, and for five minutes after. When cool, add the yolks of six eggs, beaten with two table-spoonfuls of pounded loaf sugar, and stir in the well-beaten whites of the eggs, and dress the soufflet in the dish like a pyramid. Bake it in an oven.

It may be made with two table-spoonfuls of potato flour, which mix with a little milk and a little salt, and then thicken it over the fire with more milk; put a little orange-flower water, or any other perfume; whilst in the oven, it may be glazed with sifted loaf sugar.

ORANGE SOUFFLET.

Mix with a table-spoonful of flour a pint of cream; put it into a sauce-pan, with two spoonfuls of rose water, a little cinnamon and orange-peel; stir it till it boil. Strain and sweeten it, and when cold, mix in two table-spoonfuls of orange marmalade; beat well six eggs with a glass of brandy; mix all together; put it in a buttered shape; place it in a sauce-pan of boiling water, over a stove; let it boil one hour and a quarter without a cloth or cover over it.

OMELET.

Beat up eight eggs extremely well; strain and season them with pepper, salt, nutmeg, minced parsley, and shallot, some grated lean ham, and a little good gravy; fry it lightly in a quarter of a pound of butter; hold a salamander, or a hot shovel, over the top, to take off the raw appearance of the eggs; serve with a rich thick brown gravy, or without it, if it be preferred dry. In frying the omelet, raise it frequently, as it begins to fasten, with a knife, from the bottom of the pan, so that the butter may get under it.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE OMELET.

Beat eight eggs till they are very light; add a tea-cupful of rich cream, two middling-sized onions pounded, and some boiled parsley minced, half a tea-spoonful of salt, and a little pepper; mix all well together, and fry it of a light brown, in three or four ounces of butter; before serving, let it stand a few minutes before the fire. If onions are disliked, finely-minced sweet herbs may be substituted.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE OMELET.

Beard and parboil twelve or sixteen oysters, seasoning them with a few white peppercorns; strain and chop them; beat well six eggs; parboil and mince a little parsley; mix all together, and season with a little nutmeg, salt, and a table-spoonful of mushroom catsup; fry it lightly in three ounces of butter, and hold it for a minute or two before the fire.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE OMELET.

Beat well and strain six eggs; add them to three ounces of butter made hot; mix in some grated ham, pepper, salt, and nutmeg, some chopped chives and parsley. Fry it of a light brown colour. – Salt herring fritted and minced may be substituted for the ham.

OMELET WITH KIDNEY OF VEAL.

To eight well-beaten eggs, add a little salt, and part of a cold roasted kidney of veal, finely minced; season with pepper, and a little more salt; melt in a frying-pan one ounce and a half of butter, and pour in the omelet; fry it gently, and keep the middle part moist; when done, roll it equally upon a knife, and serve it very hot.

OMELETTE A LA FRANCAISE.

Strain four well-beaten eggs; season them with a little white pepper, salt, one small onion, and a little parsley finely minced; add a tea-cupful of cold water. Put into a frying-pan a table-spoonful of butter; when boiling hot, pour in the omelet, stir it with a fork till it becomes firm; turn it at each end, so as to make it of a square or oblong form; and serve it hot.

MACARONI.

Break the macaroni into small bits; wash it, and simmer half a pound in a quart of good veal stock, and when quite tender, add some grated Parmesan cheese, and make it quite hot; put grated cheese into the bottom of a dish, and put over it the boiled macaroni; strew some cheese upon the top, and put small bits of butter here and there; brown it with a salamander, or in an oven. A border of puff paste may be put round the dish, when it is baked, and the cheese ought not to be previously heated with the macaroni.

The macaroni may be dressed without the cheese.

ANOTHER WAY TO DRESS MACARONI.

Simmer the macaroni in milk, and when quite tender, mix with it two ounces of salt butter; put grated cheese into the bottom of the dish, and then a layer of macaroni; begin and end with the cheese, and over the top strew sifted bread; put on it small bits of butter, and brown it in a Dutch oven, or with a salamander.

ANOTHER WAY TO DRESS MACARONI.

Simmer the macaroni with a little salt, gravy, and water, half and half; when tender, strain, and put it into a sauce-pan with a quarter of a pound of butter, a finely-minced onion, and a tea-cupful of cream; grate half a pound of cheese, and heat the half of it with the macaroni; dish it, and strew over the top the remainder of the cheese; brown it with a salamander.

ANOTHER WAY TO DRESS MACARONI.

Simmer a quarter of a pound of macaroni in a quart of milk; strain, and put it into a sauce-pan, with a pint of cream, four table-spoonful of grated Parmesan cheese, one ounce of butter, and a little salt; boil it for ten minutes. Put it into a dish, and brown it with a salamander.

ANOTHER WAY TO DRESS MACARONI.

Put the macaroni into boiling milk and water, with a little salt, and about an ounce of fresh butter; let it simmer till tender, drain off the water, and mix with it a cupful of thick cream; make it quite hot, and if approved, add some grated nutmeg.

ANOTHER WAY, PLAIN DRESSED.

Throw a little salt into a sauce-pan of boiling water; put in half a pound of macaroni, let it simmer three quarter of an hour, stir it occasionally, strain off the water; have ready a breakfast-plateful of grated Dutch cheese, put little bits of butter in the bottom of the dish, then some macaroni, and a layer of cheese; put them alternately, mix all together, and serve it hot.

TO MAKE MACARONI.

Beat four eggs for eight or ten minutes; strain them, and stir in flour till stiff enough to work into a paste upon a marble or stone slab; add flour till it be a stiff paste, and work it well; cut off a small bit at a time, roll it out as thin as paper, and cut it with a paste-cutter or knife into very narrow strips; twist, and lay them upon a clean cloth, in a dry, warm place; in a few hours it will be perfectly hard; put it into a box, with white paper under and over it. It may be cut into small stars, or circles, to be used for soup, and does not require so much boiling as the Italian macaroni.

FROMAGE CUIT.

Cut half a pound of Cheshire cheese into thin bits, and pound it in a mortar; add by degrees the well-beaten yolks of two, and the white of one egg, and half a pint of cream; mix it well together, and bake it for ten or fifteen minutes.

RAMAKINS.

The well-beaten yolks of four eggs, half a pound of grated cheese, a gill of cream, one ounce of oiled butter; mix all together, and bake it in small paper cases in a Dutch oven. To oil the butter, put it into a tea-cup, and set it in a basin of boiling water.

TO TOAST CHEESE.

Cut some double or single Gloucester cheese into small shavings, and put it with a bit of butter into a cheese-toaster; place it before the fire till the cheese dissolves, stirring it now and then. Serve with a slice of toasted bread, divided into four, and the crust pared off. It is generally eaten with mustard, salt, and pepper.

ANOTHER WAY TO TOAST CHEESE.

Mix, with four ounces of grated and sifted bread crumbs, two ounces and a half of fresh butter, three ounces of good cheese finely grated, the well-beaten yolks of two eggs, a table-spoonful of cream, a tea-spoonful of mustard, a little salt and pepper; put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it till it be heated, and then lay it thick upon small bits of toasted bread, and brown it with a salamander, or hot shovel, or lay the paste upon bits of toast; put them, covered with a dish, into a Dutch oven till hot through, and let the cheese just brown. Serve as hot as possible.

WELSH RABBIT.

Pare the crust off a slice of bread, toast it nicely, divide it in two, butter it, and lay upon each half a thin slice of cheese which has been toasted in a Dutch oven; if, when put upon the toast, it is not sufficiently browned, hold a salamander, or hot shovel, over the top. Serve it very hot.

TO STEW CHEESE.

Melt three quarter of an ounce of butter in a tea-cupful of cream; mix with it a quarter of a pound of good cheese finely grated; beat it well together; put a slice of toasted bread into a dish, and pour the mixture over it, and brown it with a salamander.

BOILED CHEESE.

Grate a quarter of a pound of good cheese; put it into a sauce-pan, with a bit of butter the size of a nutmeg, and half a tea-cupful of milk; stir if over the fire till it boil, and then add a well-beaten egg; mix it all together, put it into a small dish, and brown it before the fire; or serve it without being browned.

TO POT CHESHIRE CHEESE.

Scrape down three pounds of fine Cheshire or Gloucester cheese; with half a pound of fresh butter, pound it to a paste in a marble mortar, adding a large wine-glass of malmsey Madeira, or of sherry, and a quarter of an ounce of pounded and sifted mace; when beaten to a paste, press it into a deep pot, and cover it with clarified butter. A thick slice may be served in a napkin to resemble cream cheese.

ANCHOVY TOAST.

Pare the crust off a slice of bread; cut it into six or eight bits, fry them in clarified butter, and when cold, spread upon them two or three anchovies, boned, washed, and pounded to a paste, together with a little fresh butter.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ANCHOVY TOAST.

Bone and roll up two or three anchovies, place them upon pieces of dry toast, and garnish with curled parsley.

BUTTER OF ANCHOVIES.

Wash from the pickle some fine young anchovies; bone, and take off the heads, then pound them in a mortar with fresh butter till quite smooth, and rub it through a sieve.


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