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THE PRACTICE OF COOKERY
CHAPTER XIV - CREAMS, CUSTARDS, JELLIES, AND OTHER SWEET DISHES.


RED CURRANT OR PINK CREAM.

Pick the currants from the stalks; put them into a jar closely covered, and set it in a pan of cold water; let it boil for two hours; strain the juice through a sieve, and sweeten it well with pounded loaf sugar. When cold, add a quart of cream to a pint of juice, and beat it with a whisk till thick. Serve in a deep glass dish.

ANOTHER RED CURRANT OR PINK CREAM.

Squeeze three quarters of a pint of juice from red currants when full ripe; add to it rather more than a quarter of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and the juice of one lemon; stir it into a pint and a half of cream, and whisk it till quite thick. Serve it in a glass dish, or in jelly glasses. It may be made with currant jelly, which mix with the lemon juice and sugar.

CUSTARD CREAM.

Boil, in half a pint of milk, a stick of cinnamon, the peel of a lemon cut thin, two or three laurel leaves, or a few bitter almonds bruised; strain, and add it to three pints of cream; stir into it the well-beaten yolks of eight eggs; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it constantly till it thickens, which it will do before it comes to a boil; pour it into a deep dish, and stir it now and then till cold. Serve in a glass dish, or custard cups.

RASPBERRY CREAM.

Gather the fruit upon a dry day; mash, and drip it through a jelly-bag; to every pint of juice add a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and when it is completely dissolved, bottle it in pint and half-pint bottles, filling them only to the neck. When to be used, mix it with rich cream, add more sugar, and whisk it till thick.  It may be made the day before it is required.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE RASPBERRY CREAM.

Mix a little pounded loaf sugar with a pint and a half of good cream, about a tea-cupful of raspberry jelly, the grated rind of one, and the juice of half a lemon; beat it well together, and, with a syllabub mill, mill it slowly for half an hour, or till it be thick and solid. Put it into a glass dish, or serve it in custard glasses.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE RASPBERRY CREAM.

Put six ounces of raspberry jam to a quart of cream; pulp it through a lawn sieve, mix it with the juice of a lemon and a little sugar, and whisk it till thick. Serve it in a dish or glasses.

Strawberry cream may be made in the same way. For common use, substitute good milk for the cream.

WHIPT CREAM.

Sweeten, with pounded loaf sugar, a quart of cream, and add to it a lump of sugar which has been rubbed upon the peel of two fine lemons or bitter oranges; or flavour it with orange-flower water, a little essence of roses, the juice of ripe strawberries, or of any other fruit. Whisk the cream well in a large pan, and, as the froth rises, take it off, and lay it upon a sieve placed over another pan, and return the cream which drains from the froth, till all is whisked; then heap it upon a dish, or put it into glasses. Garnish with thinly-pared, citron, or cedraty, cut into small leaves, or into any fanciful shape.

To colour the rose cream, or to heighten that of strawberry, a little carmine or lake may be mixed with the cream, which may be iced when made.

SPANISH CREAM.

Boil, in half a pint of water, one ounce of isinglass, till dissolved; strain, and mix it with a quart of cram or good milk – if cream, not so much isinglass; stir it over the fire till it comes to a boil; when a little cooled, add gradually the beaten yolks of six eggs, and a glass of white wine. Pour it into a deep dish, sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, stir it till cold, and then put it into a shape. Or, in lieu of the glass of wine, rub a lump of sugar upon the peel of a lemon to extract the flavour, and add it to the cream.

HONEYCOMB CREAM.

Mix, in a glass or china dish, the strained juice of three lemons with half a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar. Put about a quart of good cream into a tea-pot, place the dish upon the floor, and pour the cream very slowly over the sugar and lemon juice, holding the tea-pot as high as possible, so as to froth the cream. At table it should be well stirred before it is helped.

COFFEE CREAM.

Put two handfuls of fresh-burnt coffee, while hot, into a quart of boiling new milk; cover it closely for three or four hours; strain, sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, and add the well-beaten yolks of eight eggs; strain it again, and put it into custard-cups, which place in a sauce-pan of boiling water, to remain till they be firm.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE COFFEE CREAM.

Dissolve half an ounce of isinglass; boil it with a quart of cream, and mix with it about a pint of very strong coffee; sweeten it well with pounded white sugarcandy; whisk it for a few minutes, and serve it in custard-cups. It may be perfumed with a tea-spoonful of the essence of the cedrat fruit.

SOLID CREAM.

Squeeze the juice of a large lemon upon three or four table-spoonfuls of pounded loaf sugar; add two table-spoonfuls of brandy, and one pint of cream; pour it from one cup into another, till it be sufficiently thick.

ITALIAN CREAM.

Mix with the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, a table-spoonful of flour, a little salt, half the grated peel of a lemon, and a pint of milk; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, beat it quite smooth, put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it constantly till it thickens; then put some into the bottom of a dish, and put in a layer of spunge-cake dipped in white wine, and another layer of the cream, till all is in the dish; cover the top with a thick snow froth, and brown it with a hot shovel.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ITALIAN CREAM.

Sweeten a pint of cream with pounded loaf sugar; boil it with the thinly-pared rind of a lemon, and a bit of cinnamon; strain, and mix it with half an ounce of dissolved isinglass; add it, while boiling hot, to the well-beaten yolks of six eggs, stir it till quite cold, and put it into a shape or mould.

BURNT CREAM.

Boil a pint of cream with the peel of a lemon; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar; beat, with the yolks of six, and the whites of four eggs, one table-spoonful of flour, the same of orange-flower water and of ratafia; strain the cream, and when nearly cold, mix it with the eggs and other things; stir it over the fire till it be as thick as a custard; put it into a silver dish, strew loaf sugar over the top, and brown it with a salamander. Serve it cold.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BURNT CREAM.

Beat, with the yolks of four eggs, a table-spoonful of flour, the grated peel of half a lemon, and three pounded bitter almonds; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, and stir it over the fire till it becomes as thick as a custard; put it into the dish it is to be served in. Boil with a little water some pounded loaf sugar, till it turn brown, but do not stir it till taken off the fire; by degrees pour it in figures over the top of the cream. It may be eaten hot or cold.

LEMON CREAM.

Mix with a quart of cream the thinly-pared rind of a large lemon, the strained juice of two lemons; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar; whisk it in a large pan, and as the froth rises, lay it upon a sieve placed over a deep dish; as it drains, pour the cream into the pan till all is done. Take out the lemon-peel, put a piece of muslin into an earthenware or tin shape, with holes in it; fill it with the whipt cream, heaped as high a possible; set it in a cool place, and turn it out in twelve hours. This cream may be served in a glass dish, after it has been whisked a quarter of an hour.

WHITE LEMON CREAM.

Rub, with some lumps of loaf sugar, the rinds of six lemons, and grate off the remainder; squeeze, and strain the juice, and add the grated peel and sugar, with three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar; put to this a quart of rich cream, and whisk it till very thick. The following day, soak five or six spunge biscuits in white wine, and put over them the cream.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE WHITE LEMON CREAM.

Boil the thin peel of two lemons in a pint of cream; strain, and thicken it with the well-beaten yolks of three, and the whites of four eggs; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, stir it till nearly cold, and put it into glasses.

STONE CREAM.

Put three table-spoonfuls of lemon juice, and the grated peel of one, some preserved apricots, or any other sweetmeat, into a glass or china dish. Boil a quarter of an ounce of isinglass in a little water, till dissolved; add it to a pint of cream, sweetened well with pounded loaf sugar; boil it, and stir it all the time; pour it into a jug, stir it now and then till milk-warm, then pour it over the sweetmeat round and round. It may be made the day before being served.

APPLE CREAM.

Boil twelve large apples in water till soft; take off the peel, and press the pulp through a hair-sieve upon a pound of pounded loaf sugar; whip the whites of two eggs, add them to the apples, and beat all together till it becomes very stiff, and looks quite white. Serve it heaped up on a dish.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE APPLE CREAM.

Peel and core five large apples; boil them in a little water, till soft enough to press through a sieve; sweeten, and beat with them the whisked whites of five eggs. Serve it with cream poured round it.

SWISS CREAM.

Boil the grated peel of a large lemon, and three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, in a pint of cream; squeeze the juice of the lemon upon a table-spoonful of flour, work it well together, and gradually add to it the boiling cream, and heat it all over the fire; pour it into a basin, and when nearly cold, put it into a glass or china dish, and garnish it with candied orange-peel, and citron cut into straws. This dish requires to be constantly stirred till it is put into the one in which it is to be served.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE SWISS CREAM.

Whisk, upon a hot plate, the yolks of eight eggs, half a pound of finely-pounded sugar, the grated rind of a lemon, and half a pint of light French or Rhenish white wine, and send it warm to table.

LEMON CREAM.

Steep the thinly-pared rinds of four large lemons in a pint of water for twelve hours; strain, and dissolve in it three quarters of a pound of fine loaf sugar, add the juice of the lemons strained, and the well-beaten whites of seven, and the yolk of one egg. Boil it over a slow fire, stirring it constantly one way, till it is like a thick cream; pour it into a glass or china dish.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE LEMON CREAM.

Steep the peel of a large lemon in half a pint of water for twelve hour; strain, and add to the water a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, the juice of two lemons, and the well-beaten yolks of three, and whites of two eggs; stir it constantly one way over the fire till thick. Serve in custard-cups.

It may be perfumed with orange-flower water, ambergris, or musk.

CREAM ROSEAT.

Beat to a stiff froth the whites of four eggs; sweeten and boil a pint of good milk; drop about three table-spoonfuls of the froth into it; turn it over once or twice with the spoon, take it out, and put it upon the back of a lawn sieve placed over a large plate; repeat this till it is all done; add to the milk another half pint, with a little more sugar, and mix it with the beaten yolks of the eggs; stir it over the fire till thick; put it into a basin, and stir it now and then till nearly cold; add a table-spoonful of rose water, and one of brandy. Serve it in a glass dish, and lay the whites of the eggs over the top at equal distances. Cut citron and candied orange-peel into straws, and put them over the whites of the eggs, or strew over them coloured comfits.

CREAM FOR FRUIT TARTS.

Boil a stick of cinnamon, two or three peach leaves, or a few bruised bitter almonds, in a quart of milk; strain, sweeten, and mix it, when cool, with three or four well-beaten eggs; stir it constantly over the fire till it thickens. It may be eaten with stewed apples, prunes, damsons, or any other fruit.

ARROW-ROOT CREAM.

Mix a table-spoonful of arrow-root with a tea-cupful of cold water; let it settle, and pour the water off. Sweeten and boil a quart of milk with the peel of a lemon and some cinnamon; pick them out, and pour it boiling upon the arrow-root, stirring it well and frequently till it be cold. Serve it in a glass or china dish, with or without grated nutmeg on the top. It may be eaten with any preserved fruit, or fruit tarts.

ORANGE CREAM.

Squeeze and strain the juice of eleven oranges; sweeten it well with pounded loaf sugar; stir it over a slow fire till the sugar be dissolved, and take off the scum as it rises; when cold, mix it with the well-beaten yolks of twelve eggs, to which a pint of cream has been added; stir it again over the fire till thick. Serve in a glass dish or custard-cups.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE CREAM.

Boil three quarters of an ounce of isinglass in half a pint of water, till half reduced; sweeten well, with pounded and sifted loaf sugar, the strained juice of four oranges and one lemon; mix in the isinglass when nearly cold, and immediately stir in a pint of cream previously beaten to a froth; stir it occasionally till it begin to stiffen, and then put it into a mould. The juice of any sort of fruit may be managed in the same way, always adding the juice of a lemon.

CALEDONIAN CREAM.

Mince a table-spoonful of orange marmalade; add it, with a glass of brandy, some pounded loaf sugar, and the juice of a lemon, to a quart of cream; whisk it for half an hour, and pour it into a shape with holes in it, or put it into a small hair-sieve, with a bit of thin muslin laid into it.

IMPERIAL CREAM.

Squeeze and strain the juice of three lemons; grate the rinds of two, mix them with two glasses of brandy, and sweeten well with pounded loaf sugar; add a quart of cream made hot, and also sweetened; pour it through a tea-pot. The dish must stand upon the floor, and the person who pours in the cream upon a table, carrying the stream up by degrees as high as possible. When cold, garnish the dish with lemon-peel.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE IMPERIAL CREAM.

Add a table-spoonful of orange-flower water to the juice of three lemons, and stir in pounded loaf sugar till as thick as a sirup; boil a pint of milk, with half the peel of a lemon, and a little sugar; stir it till milk-warm, and put it all into a tea-pot, from which pour it into a dish placed upon the floor.

RATAFIA CREAM.

In a tea-cupful of thin cream, boil two or three large laurel, or young peach leaves; when it has boiled three or four minutes, strain, and mix with it a pint of rich sweet cream; add three well-beaten whites of eggs, and sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar. Put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it gently one way over a slow fire till it be thick; pour it into a china dish, and when quite cold, ornament it with sweetmeats cut out like flowers; or strew over the top harlequin comfits.

CURDS AND CREAMS.

With about half a table-spoonful of rennet, turn two quarts of milk just from the cow; drain off the whey, and fill a mould with the curd; when it has stood an hour or two, turn it out. Strew coloured comfits over it, sweeten some cream, mix grated nutmeg with it, and pour it round the curd.

NAPLES CURD.

Put into a quart of new milk a stick of cinnamon, boil it a few minutes, take out the cinnamon, and stir in eight well-beaten eggs, and a table-spoonful of white wine; when it boils again, strain it through a sieve; beat the curd in a basin, together with about half an ounce of butter, two table-spoonfuls of orange-flower water, and pounded sugar sufficient to sweeten it. Put it into a mould for two hours before it is sent to table.

White wine, sugar, and cream, may be mixed together, and poured round the curd, or served in a sauce-tureen.

KERRY BUTTERMILK.

Put six quarts of buttermilk into a cheese-cloth, hang it in a cool place, and let the whey drip from it for two or three days; when it is rather thick, put it into a basin, sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, and add a glass of brandy, or of sweet wine, and as much raspberry jam, or sirup, as will colour and give it an agreeable flavour. Whisk it well together, and serve it in a glass dish.

HATTERED KIT.

Make two quarts of new milk scalding hot, and pour it quickly upon four quarts of fresh-made buttermilk, after which it must not be stirred; let it remain till cold and firm, then take off the top part, drain it in a hair-sieve, and put it into a shape for half an hour. It is eaten with cream, served in a separate dish.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE HATTERED KIT.

Put into the dish it is to be served in, one-third of cream with two-thirds of buttermilk, add a little pounded loaf sugar, and beat it well together. Strew over it a little pounded cinnamon, and let it stand for three or four hours.

ALMOND CREAM.

Blanch and pound to a paste, with rose water, six ounces of almonds; mix them with a pint and a half of cream which has been boiled with the peel of a small lemon; add two well-beaten eggs, and stir the whole over the fire till it be thick, taking care not to allow it to boil; sweeten it, and when nearly cold, stir in a table-spoonful of orange-flower or rose water.

RASPBERRY ICED CREAM.

Mix a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar, a large wooden-spoonful of raspberry jelly, and a little cochineal, to heighten the colour, with the juice of a large lemon, and a pint and a half of cream; strain, and put it into the freezing-pot; cover it closely, and place it in a bucket which has a small hole near the bottom, and a spigot to let the water run off, and which has in it plenty of ice broken small, and mixed with three or four handfuls of coarse salt; press the ice closely round the freezing-pot, turn it round and round for about ten minutes, take off the cover, and remove the frozen cream to the centre with a spoon, cover it again, and turn it till all be equally iced. Serve it in China ice pails, or put it into moulds, cover them tightly with wet bladder, and place them in a bucket with ice, as before, for an hour or more; dip the moulds into cold water before turning out, and serve them immediately. Water ices are made in this way, substituting water for cream.

APRICOT ICED CREAM.

Mix a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar with a large one of apricot jam, the juice of a lemon, and half an ounce of blanched bitter almonds pounded with a little rose water; add a pint of cream, and stir it all well together before putting it into the freezing-pot.

MILLE FRUIT ICED CREAM.

Strain the juice of three lemons, grate the peel of one; mince finely, of orange marmalade, dried cherries, and preserved angelica, a dessert-spoonful each; add to these half a pint of sirup, and mix the whole with a pint and a half of cream, or a pint of water, and then drop in here and there a few drops of the prepared cochineal. Put it into a mould, and freeze it.

ORANGE WATER ICED.

Mix with a pint of water the strained juice of three China oranges, and that of one lemon, also the grated peel of one orange; sweeten it well with sirup.

THE JUICE OF FRESH-GATHERED FRUIT ICED.

Press through a sieve the juice of a pint of picked currants or raspberries; add to it four or five ounces of pounded loaf sugar, a little lemon juice, and a pint of cream. It may be whisked previous to freezing, and a mixture of the juice may be added.

BLANCMANGE.

Boil till dissolved, in a large tea-cupful of water, three quarters of an ounce of isinglass; when milk-warm, add it to a quart of rich cream, with a stick of cinnamon, the peel of a lemon, two or three laurel leaves, or a few bitter almonds; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar; stir it over the fire, and let it boil for two or three minutes; strain it through a bit of muslin into a deep dish, and stir it till nearly cold, then pour it into an earthenware mould or shape; the following day, dip the mould into warm water for a minute or so, clap it with the hand to loosen the edge, place the glass or china dish over the mould, and turn it out quickly upon the dish. As much cow-heel stock as will half fill the shape may be substituted for the isinglass.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BLANCMANGE.

Blanch and pound, with a little ratafia or rose water, two ounces of sweet, and six bitter almonds; dissolve three quarters of an ounce of isinglass; add it, when milk-warm, to a quart of good cream – half milk half cream may be used; mix in the almonds, the peel of a small lemon, and a bit of cinnamon; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, let it stand for two or three hours, put it into a sauce-pan, stir it constantly, and let it boil for six or eight minutes; strain it through a lawn sieve, and stir it till nearly cold, then pour it into a mould.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BLANCMANGE.

Blanch and pound one ounce of sweet almonds with a glass of sherry, and a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar; add it to three quarters of an ounce of isinglass dissolved in half a pint of water, and boil it till the flavour of the almonds be extracted, stirring it all the time; strain it through a bit of thin muslin, and mix with it a quart of good cream; stir it till quite cold, and pour it into a shape.

BLANCMANGE EGGS.

Make a small hole at the end of four or five large eggs, and let out all the egg carefully; wash the shells, drain, and fill them with blancmange; place them in a deep dish filled with rice or barley to keep them steady, and when quite cold, gently break and peel off the shell. Cut the peel of a lemon into delicately fine shreds, lay them into a glass dish, and put in the eggs; or serve them in a glass dish with a pink cream round them.

AMERICAN BLANCMANGE.

Mix half a pint of cold water with two ounces of arrow-root; let it settle for fifteen minutes, pour off the water, and add a table-spoonful of laurel water, and a little sugar; sweeten a quart of new milk, boil it with a little cinnamon, and half the peel of a lemon; pick out the cinnamon and lemon, and pour the boiling milk upon the arrow-root, stirring it all the time. Put it into a mould, and turn it out the following day.

DUTCH BLANCMANGE.

Wash one ounce and a half of isinglass, pour a pint and a half of boiling water over it, let it stand for an hour, and then boil it for twenty minutes; strain, and when it is nearly cold, add the beaten yolks of six eggs, a pint of Lisbon wine, the peel of one, and juice of two lemons, with a stick of cinnamon, and sweeten with pounded loaf sugar; stir it over the fire till it begin to simmer, but do not allow it to boil; pick out the peel and cinnamon, pour it into a basin, stir it till nearly cold, and put it into a shape.

CUSTARD.

Sweeten a quart of thin cream, or good milk, with pounded loaf sugar; boil it with a bit of cinnamon, and half the peel of a lemon; strain it, and when a little cooled, mix it gradually with the well-beaten yolks of ten eggs; stir it over a slow fire till it be pretty thick, pour it into a basin, and add a table-spoonful of rose water, and one of brandy; keep stirring it every now and then till cold, and then put it into glasses, cups or a dish. It may be made the day before it is used.

ALMOND CUSTARD.

Blanch and pound, with two table-spoonfuls of orange-flower water, a quarter of a pound of almonds; add rather more than a pint of cream, and the well-beaten yolks of six eggs; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and stir it over a slow fire till it thickens; but do not allow it boil. Serve it in a glass dish, or cups, and put over the top sifted loaf sugar.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ALMOND CUSTARD.

With a quart of thin cream, mix four ounces of pounded loaf sugar, two ounces of sweet, and one of bitter almonds finely pounded, and a stick of cinnamon; stir till it boils, and then till nearly cold; pick out the cinnamon, and add the beaten yolks of eight eggs, and of rose water and of brandy two table-spoonful each; stir it again over the fire till it thickens, but do not allow it to boil. Serve in custard glasses.

LEMON CUSTARD.

Boil two glasses of white wine, half a pint of water, and two table-spoonfuls of brandy; when nearly cold, add the grated peel and juice of two lemons, with half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and the well-beaten yolks of six eggs; stir it over a slow fire till it thickens, pour it into a basin, and stir now and then till cold; put it into a dish, or cups, with sifted loaf sugar over the top.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE LEMON CUSTARD.

Put the juice of four lemons, with three ounces of pounded loaf sugar, into a deep dish. Boil the grated peel of one lemon and two ounces of pounded loaf sugar in a quart of cream, and pour it over the juice and sugar. It will keep for four days.

TURNING OUT CUSTARD.

Mix, with the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, a pint of new milk, half an ounce of isinglass dissolved, or enough of calf’s feet stock to stiffen it, and two laurel leaves; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and stir it till a little cooled, then pour it into cups to turn out when quite cold. Beat the yolks of two eggs with a little cream; add it to nearly half a pound of brown sugar burnt; strain it through a sieve, and when cold, pour it round the custards.

ORANGE CUSTARD.

Sweeten the strained juice of ten oranges with pounded loaf sugar; stir it over the fire till hot, take off the scum, and when nearly cold, add to it the beaten yolks of twelve eggs, and a pint of cream; put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it over a slow fire till it thickens. Serve in cups or a dish.

DURHAM CUSTARD.

To a pint of cream add the well-beaten yolks of two eggs and about a third of a pint of mild strong ale; sweeten, and stir it over the fire till it nearly boils, then pour it into a dish, in the bottom of which is laid thin toasted bread, cut into square bits.

RICE CUSTARD.

Mix a pint of milk, half a pint of cream, one ounce of sifted ground rice, five or six bitter almonds, blanched and pounded with two table-spoonfuls of rose water; sweeten with loaf sugar, and stir it altogether till it nearly boil; add the well-beaten yolks of three eggs; stir, and let it simmer for about a minute; pour it into a dish, or serve it in cups, with sifted loaf sugar over the top.

COMMON CUSTARD.

Boil a pint of milk with a bit of cinnamon and two or three laurel leaves; mix with one table-spoonful of flour, or potato flour, two and a half of cold milk, put it into a lawn sieve, and pour the boiling milk upon it; let it run into a basin; mix in by degrees the well-beaten yolks of three eggs, sweeten, and stir it over the fire for a few minutes to thicken.

CUSTARD WITH CAKES.

Break into small bits twelve macaroons, and twelve ratafia biscuits; pour over them a hot custard, and stir it till well mixed with the cakes. Put it into a glass dish, and when cold, grate nutmeg over it.

TO ORNAMENT CUSTARDS OR CREAMS.

Whisk for one hour the whites of two eggs, together with two table-spoonfuls of raspberry, or red currant sirup or jelly; lay it in any form upon a custard or cream, piled up to imitate rock. It may be served in a dish with cream round it.

CALF’S-FEET JELLY CAKE.

Scald, take off the hair, and clean two dozen of calf’s feet; put them on in cold water, allowing the proportion of two quarts to four feet; boil them slowly for eight or nine hours, take out the bones, and strain the liquor through a hair-sieve. The following day, remove carefully every particle of fat, and the sediment at the bottom, then put the jelly into a nicely-cleaned brass pan; let it boil over a stove, or slow fire, till it becomes very thick, and appears almost black in the pan; then put a little of it over the bottom of small plates to dry, and when cool, turn it; the next day lay it upon tins, or sheets of paper, and place them at a little distance from the fire, that it may dry gradually; when clear and hard, put it up in paper bags. Four ounces of this jelly, dissolved in three pints of water, and boiled to a quart, is sufficient to make what will fill two middling-sized moulds. Ox feet may be substituted for calf’s feet; the jelly made from them is equally good, but not so delicate in colour.

JELLY.

To a quart of the stock jelly put half a pound of loaf sugar pounded, a stick or two of cinnamon broken into small bits, the peel of a lemon, a pint of currant wine, and one of sherry or teneriffe, and the beaten whites of five eggs; put it all into a nicely-cleaned sauce-pan, stir it gently till it boils, and boil it for three or four minutes. Pour it into a jelly-bag, with a basin or mug placed underneath; run it immediately through the bag again into another basin, and repeat this till it begins to drop, pour about a pint of boiling water into the bag, which will produce a little thin jelly fit to drink. The stand with the jelly-bag should be placed near to the fire: sherry alone, or teneriffe, may be used. The jelly may be put into quart bottles, corked tightly, with will make it keep good for some weeks; place the bottle in warm water when it is required for use.

FRESH CALF’S-FEET STOCK.

Scald, take off the hair, and wash very clean four feet; put them into a sauce-pan with two quarts of cold water, and when it comes to a boil, let them simmer for six or seven hours; take out the feet, and strain the liquor into a deep dish. The following day remove the fat carefully from the top, and give it another boil, which will reduce it to one quart of stiff stock or jelly.

ALE OR PORTER JELLY.

For a large shape, put to the prepared stock or jelly more than half a bottle of strong ale or porter, a pound of loaf sugar, the peel of one, and the juice of four large lemons, a stick of cinnamon, and the beaten whites of eight eggs; put it all into a sauce-pan, stir it gently; let it boil for fifteen minutes, and pour it into a jelly-bag till it runs perfectly clear.

OX-FEET JELLY.

Put a little hot water over the top of the stock, pour it off, and wipe it dry with a clean cloth; put a quart of it into a sauce-pan with the beaten whites of five or six eggs, the juice of five lemons made very sweet with good brown sugar, a clove or two, and a little cinnamon pounded; let it boil twenty minutes, stirring it all the time; take it off the fire, and add a pint, or half a pint of white wine, and run it through a jelly-bag till clear.

HARTSHORN JELLY.

Boil ten ounces of hartshorn shavings in four quarts of water till reduces to three pints; strain it; when cold, add to it a pint of white wine, one pound of loaf sugar, and the peel of two lemons; set it over the fire, stir it till the jelly is melted, and pour in the strained juice of eight lemons, and the beaten whites of twelve eggs; stir it, and let it boil quickly for a few minutes; pour it into a jelly-bag till it runs perfectly clear.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE HARTSHORN JELLY.

Boil half a pound of hartshorn shavings for three hours and a half in four pints and a half of water; strain it through a bit of muslin, and stir into it three ounces of dissolved isinglass; if large, the peel of one, if small, of two lemons, and their juice, half the peel of an orange, three parts of a tea-cupful of brandy, and one of white wine; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and when luke-warm, put it into a sauce-pan with the beaten whites of six eggs; stir it, and let it boil for two minutes; strain it through a jelly-bag two or three times till perfectly clear.

APPLE JELLY.

Pare and cut small thirteen good-sized acid baking apples; as they are cut, throw them into two quarts of cold water; boil them in this till the substance is extracted and nearly half the liquid wasted; drain them through a hair-sieve, and with the back of a spoon press out all the juice, run it through a jelly-bag, and to a pint of the liquid allow half or three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar. Put it on the fire with the peel of a lemon, stir it till the sugar is melted; when it boils, take off the scum, add the juice of the lemon; let it boil for twelve or fifteen minutes; try a little of it in a saucer, and when it jellies, take out the peel and pour it into a mould. This jelly will keep good for some weeks.

JAUNE MANGE.

Boil, till dissolved, in a pint of water, two ounces of isinglass, and the thinly-pared peel of one lemon and a half; strain, and add to it a pint of white wine, the juice of three Seville oranges or lemons, and the beaten yolks of eight eggs; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it over the fire till it thicken; pour it into a mould, and turn it out when cold.

ARROW-ROOT JELLY.

Steep for some hours, in two table-spoonfuls of water, the peel of a lemon, and three or four bitter almonds pounded; strain, and mix it with three table-spoonfuls of arrow-root, the same quantity of lemon juice, and one of brandy; sweeten, and stir it over the fire till quite thick, and when quite cold, put it into jelly glasses.

RUM JELLY.

Clarify, and boil to a sirup, a pound of loaf sugar; dissolve one ounce of isinglass in half a pint of water; strain it through a sieve into the sirup when it is half warm, and when nearly cold, stir in a quart of white wine; mix it well, and add one or two table- spoonfuls of Jamaica rum, stir it for a few minutes, and pour it into a mould, or into glasses.

PUNCH JELLY.

Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in five or six tea-cupfuls of water; strain, and add to it, when boiling hot, one tea-cupful and a half of brandy, the same of rum, and one of lemon juice, with half a pound of pounded loaf sugar; stir till the sugar is dissolved, and pour it into a shape.

ORANGE JELLY.

Squeeze the juice of eight oranges and six lemons; grate the peel of half the fruit, and steep it in a pint of cold water; mix it with the juice, three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar, and one ounce and a quarter of isinglass; put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it till it boils; let it boil for a few minutes, strain it through a jelly-bag till clear, and put it into a mould, or glasses.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE JELLY.

Steep the thinly-pared rinds of four bitter, two sweet oranges, and two lemons, in a pint of cold water for twelve hours; strain and boil with one ounce of isinglass till dissolved; then add the juice of the oranges and lemons; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and boil it for one minute. Strain it through a jelly-bag; put it into a mould, and turn it out the following day. 

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE JELLY.

Dissolve three quarters of an ounce of isinglass in half a pint of water; add it to a quart of cream, and the strained juice of three sweet or bitter oranges, and six ounces of loaf sugar, part of which has been previously rubbed upon the rind of the oranges; stir it in a sauce-pan over the fire till it boils, put it into a basin, stir it till nearly cold, and then pour it into a mould.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE JELLY.

Dissolve two ounces of isinglass in boiling water, add it to the strained juice of twelve oranges and one lemon; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar; boil, and strain it. The oranges may be cut into half, and the pulp taken out, the skins placed in a dish to keep them steady, and filled with jelly. It will be firm in three or four hours; or it may be served in a mould.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ORANGE JELLY.

Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in a pint of water; when nearly cold, mix with it the strained juice of eight or nine oranges; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and stir it till it be dissolved; strain it through a lawn sieve, and pour it into a shape.

POMONA JELLY.

Peel, core, and cut into quarters six large, green acid apples; throw them into cold water, as they are done; take them out, and adding about five ounces of pounded loaf sugar, stew them till quite soft; rub them through a sieve, and add three quarters of an ounce of isinglass, which has been boiled till dissolved in less than half a pint of water. Rub two lumps of sugar upon the peel of a lemon to extract the flavour, add it to the jelly, with a little more sugar if not sufficiently sweet; stir it over the fire till quite hot, and then put it into a mould. Turn it out the next day.

STRWBERRY JELLY.

Put some fresh-gathered strawberries into an earthen pan, bruise them with a wooden spoon, add a little cold water, and some finely-pounded loaf sugar. In an hour or two, strain it through a jelly-bag, and to a quart of the juice add one ounce of isinglass, which has been dissolved in half a pint of water, well-skimmed, strained, and allowed to cool; mix all well, and pour it into an earthen mould.

Raspberry jelly, red currant jelly, and red currants mixed with raspberries, may be made exactly in the same manner; and the bright red colour may be improved by mixing in a little carmine or lake. When this kind of jelly is to be made with cherries, the fruit should be boiled a few minutes in clarified sugar, and when cold, the juice of one or two lemons may be added with the isinglass.

A little lemon juice may be added to any of the other jellies, in proportion to the acidity of the fruit.

They may be iced by covering and surrounding the mould with ice, without any salt.

FLOATING ISLAND.

Boil, with a pint of milk, a bit of cinnamon, and half the peel of a lemon; when almost cold, strain it, and mix with it the beaten white of one, and the yolks of three eggs; stir it over the fire till thick, pour it into a dish, and stir it now and then till cold. Whisk the whites of two eggs, and half a pint of Guava quince or red currant jelly, till it be a very stiff froth, and heap it upon the custard.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE FLOATING ISLAND.

Three spoonfuls of raspberry or currant jelly, and the whites of an many eggs; beat them together one way till the spoon will stand erect; pile it upon the cream beaten up with wine and sugar, and a little grated lemon peel; or upon apple jelly.

UN TURBAN DE RIS, IT DE POMMES.

Boil, in milk, some fine whole rice, with half the peel of a lemon. Pare and core some apples, and cut them into quarters; stew them in a sirup of sugar and water, with a little orange marmalade, taking care to keep them quite whole. Make a rich custard as follows: - Sweeten a quart of thin cream or good milk, and boil it with lemon-peel and cinnamon; strain the cream, and let it cool. Beat up the yolks of ten eggs, and mix the cream gradually with them; put it over a slow fire, and keep stirring constantly till it is pretty thick; pour it into a dish, and stir in a table-spoonful of rose water or brandy, but both will enrich the flavour; keep stirring it occasionally till nearly cold. Place the rice round a dish in the form of a wall, put the custard into it, and build the apples all round the outside, so as to hide the rice. It may be sent to table quite cold, or in some degree warm.

ORANGE FOOL.

Mix the strained juice of three Seville oranges with six well-beaten eggs, a pint of cream, some grated nutmeg and lemon-peel; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, and stir it over a slow fire till it is as thick as a custard, but do not allow it to boil; pour it, when a little cool, into a glass dish or custard-cups; put sifted loaf sugar over the top.

GOOSEBERRY FOOL.

Scald a quart of gooseberries with half a pint of water; when quite soft, rub the pulp through a sieve. Boil half a pint of milk, and the same quantity of cream, with half the peel of lemon, and a stick of cinnamon; strain it when nearly cold, and mix it with the pulped fruit, and sweeten with good brown sugar. Serve in glasses or custard-cups. It may be made with three beaten yolks of eggs, and a pint of milk sweetened, and which is to be stirred over the fire till a little thick, and when cold, mixed with the gooseberries.

APPLE FOOL.

Pare, core, and cut into thin bits, some good stewing apples; stew them till tender, with a little water, two cloves, a bit of cinnamon, and the peel of half a lemon; pulp half a pound through a sieve, and add the same weight of brown sugar, the juice of a lemon, and the whites of two eggs; beat them all together for an hour. Serve it upon rich cream, or a boiled custard, in a glass dish.

It may be made in the same way as the gooseberry fool, as may also stewed rhubarb.

STEWED PEARS.

Slice a small beet-root, and boil it in a quart of water, strain, and boil in it eight pears peeled and cut into half, three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar, and the peel of one lemon; cover the sauce-pan closely, and stew them till quite tender. A little before they are taken off the fire, add the juice of a lemon.

ANOTHER WAY TO STEW PEARS.

Pare, cut into quarters, and take out the core of some good baking pears; throw them as they are done into cold water. To a pound of fruit allow a quarter of a pound of brown sugar, and three cloves; put them into a sauce-pan, cover them with cold water, keep the pan closely covered, and stew them gently till red and tender; add, just before serving, a glass of port wine. They may be eaten hot or cold, with cream, after dinner or at supper.

DUTCH FLUMMERY.

Boil, with a pint of white wine, some sugar, the juice of two, and the peel of one lemon, a stick of cinnamon, and half an ounce of dissolved isinglass; strain and mix it with the well-beaten yolks of seven eggs, stir it over the fire till it simmer, but do not allow it to boil; stir it till quite cold, and put it into a shape.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE DUTCH FLUMMERY.

Boil, for ten minutes, in half a pint of white wine, and the same proportion of water, the juice of three, and the peel of two lemons, rather more than a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, and an ounce of isinglass dissolved; strain, and mix it gradually with the beaten yolks of five eggs; put it again over the fire, and stir it for five minutes; stir it till cold, and put it into a shape.

MOCK ICE.

Of preserved strawberries, raspberries, and red currant jelly, a table-spoonful each; rub it through a sieve, with as much cream as will fill a shape; dissolve three quarters of an ounce of isinglass in half a pint of water; when almost cold, mix it well with the cream, put it into a shape, set it in a cool place, and turn it out the following day.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE MOCK ICE.

Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in half a pint of water; strain, and when nearly cold, mix it with a quart of cream; simmer it over the fire, and stir it all the time; add some raspberry juice and sugar. Whisk it till almost cold, and put it into a shape.

CLEAR APPLES.

Boil half a pound of loaf sugar in a pint of water; take off the scum, and put in some large apples, pared, cored, and cut into quarters, with the peel and juice of a lemon; let them boil till clear, without a cover upon the sauce-pan.

TO STEW APPLES IN HALVES.

Pare the apples, cut them in half, and take out the core; to eight good-sized baking apples allow a pint of water and a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, the peel of a lemon, and half the peel of an orange cut into thin parings; stew them in a covered sauce-pan till they are soft; serve them with the parings and sirup poured over them.

TO BAKE APPLES.

Pare the apples, cut them in quarters, or keep them whole; put them into a jar, with a glass of port wine, three ounces of brown sugar, and a few cloves, to each pound of apples. Cover the jar closely, and bake them in a quick oven for an hour.

ANOTHER WAY TO BAKE APPLES.

Pare some good eating apples, as thinly as possible, keeping on the stalks; stick two or three cloves into each apples, place them in a deep dish, strew over them pounded loaf sugar, allowing five ounces to each pound of apples, and half a pint of Madeira or sherry. Cover the dish closely, and bake them in a slow oven till they are quite tender. In lieu of cloves, a few bits of cinnamon may be put in with the wine.

FAMILY LUNCHEON, OR SUPPER DISH.

Wash seven or nine good-sized baking apples; put them in a sauce-pan, with cold water, and boil them till they are soft; drain the water from them, and serve them quite hot, place upon a dish, with the stalks upwards. They are eaten with sugar. When to be eaten with cream, the apples may be peeled before being boiled.

ITALIAN CHEESE.

Mix, with nearly half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the juice of three lemons, two table-spoonfuls of white wine, and a quart of cream; beat it with a whisk till quite thick, which may be in half an hour; put a bit of muslin into a hair-sieve, and pour in the cream. In twelve hours, turn it out, and garnish it with flowers. It may be put into a tin shape with holes in it.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ITALIAN CHEESE.

Mix, with half a bottle of sherry or teneriffe, nearly three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the grated rind of three lemons, the strained juice of four, and a quart of cream; whisk it for fifteen or twenty minutes; put a piece of muslin into an earthenware shape with holes in it; pour in the cream, and turn it out the following day.

DUTCH CREAM CHEESE.

Beat the yolks of eight, and the whites of three eggs, and mix them with a pint of buttermilk; add this to three quarts of boiling milk just from the cow; let it boil up once, take it off the fire, cover it, and let it stand a little that the curd may form; then put it into a small hair-sieve, and press it with a weight for twenty-four hours, when it may be turned out. It is eaten with cream and sugar.

SNOW CHEESE.

Sweeten, with pounded loaf sugar, a quart of thick cream; add the strained juice of three lemons, and one ounce and a half of blanched sweet almonds pounded, with two table-spoonfuls of rose water, and one of ratafia. Beat it with a whisk till thick, and put it into a shape or sieve, with a bit of muslin laid into it, and in twelve hours turn it out.

CLARET PUFFS.

Mix together, and sweeten with pounded loaf sugar, a pint of claret, and rather more than one of rich cram; let it stand a night, and then whisk it to a froth, which take off as it rises, and put upon the back of a sieve to drain; heap it upon a dish, sweeten some rich cream, and pour it round the froth to make it float.

FAIRY BUTTER.

Wash a quarter of a pound of fresh butter in orange-flower water, and beat it with the pounded yolks of five or six hard-boiled eggs; blanch, and pound to a paste, with a little orange-flower water two ounces of sweet almonds; add a little grated lemon-peel, and pounded and sifted loaf sugar; mix all together, and with a wooden spoon, work it through a stone cullender. Soak some Naples biscuit in white wine, and put over them the fairy butter, in heaps as high as it can be raised.

WHIM WHAM.

Sweeten a quart of cream, and mix with it a tea-cupful of white wine, and the grated peel of a lemon; whisk it to a froth, which drain upon the back of a sieve, and put part into a deep glass dish; cut some Naples biscuit as thin as possible, and put a layer lightly over the froth, and one of the biscuit and jelly; finish with the froth, and pour the remainder of the cream into the dish, and garnish with citron and candied orange-peel cut into straws.

DEVONSHIRE JUNKET.

Turn some new milk, as for cheesecakes, in a wide shallow dish; when cold, pour over the top a pint of rich cram mixed with pounded loaf sugar, six dessert-spoonfuls of brandy, and some grated nutmeg.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE DEVONSHIRE JUNKET.

Turn some new milk from the cow with a little rennet; sweeten some thick cream, add a little pounded cinnamon, make it scalding hot, and when cold, pour it over the curd, and put a little wine and sugar into the bottom of the dish.

IRISH ROCK.

Blanch a pound of sweet and an ounce of bitter almonds; pick out a few of the sweet almonds, and cut them like straws, and blanch them in rose water; pound the rest in a mortar with a table-spoonful of brandy, four ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and half a pound of salt butter well washed; pound them till the mass looks very white, and set it in a cool place to stiffen; then dip two table-spoons into cold water, and with them form the paste, as much like an egg as possible; place in the bottom of a glass dish, a small plate or saucer turned, and lay the rock high up; stick over it the cut almonds with green sweetmeats, and ornament with a sprig of myrtle.

RICE CAKE, A SWEET DISH.

Wash well and drain a quarter of a pound of rice. Boil with a quart of fresh cream the peel of one lemon, and when nearly cold, take it out, and put in the rice; place the sauce-pan over a slow fire, and when the rice has swollen, add a little salt, and sweeten with pounded loaf sugar; when the rice is quite tender, add the yolks of eight eggs, and mix in gradually the beaten whites, with a good bit of fresh butter; clarify a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and pour it into a mould; turn this round, that the butter may equally cover every part of it, then pour out the butter, and strew over the inside a layer of grated bread; with a paste bush, or a slip of paper, sprinkle all over it some of the clarified butter, add more grated bread, pour in the rice, and bake it in a moderate oven for an hour. Turn it out upon a dish, and serve it with or without a garnishing of preserved raspberries, cherries, or currants.

CROQUETTES WITH MARMALADE.

Prepare the rice as in the receipt for a rice-cake, a sweet dish; when it is cold, form it into rolls of the size of a cork, and with the handle of a wooden spoon make an opening in the centre of them, fill it with marmalade, and close it with some rice; roll them into a beaten egg, and strew some grated bread over them; repeat this once or twice, and then fry them of a light brown colour.

These croquettes may be fried without the marmalade.

APPLES AND RICE.

Scoop the pulp from some roasted apples; sweeten it with brown sugar, and add a little grated lemon-peel; wash two ounces of whole rice, and, with a stick of cinnamon, boil it in a pint of milk; when quite soft, and nearly dry, pick out the cinnamon, and mix in the well-beaten yolks of two eggs; sweeten it with sugar, and pour it over the apples, previously put into a dish; let it bake in a Dutch oven till it be thoroughly heated, and brown it with a salamander.

RICE FLUMMERY.

Boil in a quart of milk five ounce of sifted ground rice, half an ounce of bitter almonds, blanched and pounded with two table-spoonfuls of rose water; sweeten, and stir it till very thick, so that the bottom of the sauce-pan is seen, and then put it into a mould; when quite cold, turn it out, stick over it sweet almonds, cut it into straws, and pour round it some thick cream, and a little white wine and sugar mixed with it.

RASPBERRY FLUMMERY.

Mix, with half a pint of white wine vinegar, one pound of raspberries, or one pound of preserved raspberries; let it boil for three or four minutes, stirring it constantly; strain it through a hair-sieve; dissolve one ounce of isinglass in half a pint of water; mix with it three quarters of a pound of pounded sugar, add it to the strained raspberries, stir it all well together; boil, and strain it through a bit of muslin, and put it into a shape. Turn it out when cold.

WHOLE RICE IN A SHAPE.

Wash a large tea-cupful of rice in several water; put it into a sauce-pan with cold water to cover it, when it boils, add two cupfuls of rich milk, and boil it till it become dry; put it into a shape, and press it in well. When cold; turn it out, and serve with preserved black currants, raspberries, or any sort of fruit round it.

RICE CUPS.

Sweeten a pint of milk  with pounded loaf sugar, and boil it with a stick of cinnamon; stir in sifted ground rice till thick; take it off the fire, and add the well-beaten whites of three eggs; stir it again over the fire for two or three minutes, then put it into tea-cups previously dipped in cold water; turn them out when cold, and pour round them a custard cream made with the yolks of the eggs; place upon the rice a little red currant-jelly or raspberry jam. This dish may be served warm or cold; if cold, raspberry cream or custard may be poured round it.

GOOSEBERRY PASTE.

Gather, when quite ripe, the rough red gooseberries; top and tail them; put them into a jar, tie it over with bladder, and boil it in a pot of water till the fruit be perfectly soft; pour off the thin juice, and with a wooden spoon rub the gooseberries through a fine hair-sieve; allow rather more than half the weight of the pulp of pounded loaf sugar, mix it together, and boil it till it will jelly, which will take almost two hours; stir, and skim it, then put it into a dish, and serve it when cold, to be eaten with cream.

The thin juice may be boiled with its weight of good brown sugar, and used as gooseberry jelly.

APPLE PASTE.

Pare, core, and cut small seven pounds of apples – the Carlisle or Keswick codlin is the best; put them into a preserving pan with one pint of water; boil them till quite soft, and add the weight of the apples in pounded loaf sugar, three ounces of pounded ginger, the juice of four lemons, and three or four table-spoonfuls of marmalade; stir and boil it for half an hour, and put it into moulds.

GOOSEBERRIES, CURRANTS, SHERRIES, APPLES, AND OTHER FRUITS.

To stew any of these fruits, put them into a wide-mouthed jar, with a sufficiency of brown sugar to sweeten them; cover it very closely, and set it into a pot of water to boil till the fruit becomes tender. By this method the flavour of the fruit is better preserved than by any other.

APRICOTS IN WHITE JELLY.

Put a few preserved apricots into a shape, fill it up with white currant jelly; and when cold and firm, turn it out.

CASSILE.

Mix two table-spoonfuls of potato-flour with two or three of cream or good milk; boil for a few minutes, with a quart of cream or milk, the peel of a lemon and a bit of cinnamon; stir it with the flour and cream; sweeten and stir it again over the fire for three or four minutes; pour it into a mould; turn it out when cold.

EGG MARMALADE.

Blanch and pound with a little rose water two ounces of sweet almonds, the same of orange marmalade, and four of citron; add two table-spoonfuls of brandy, and when quite smooth, the beaten yolks of six, and the whites of two eggs, with a little pounded loaf sugar; put it into a sauce-pan, and stir it till it becomes thick, then pour it into a shape. When quite cold, serve it, turned out and garnished with flowers.

GATEAU DE POMMES.

Boil in a pint of water one pound and a half of loaf sugar till it becomes a rich sirup; weigh two pounds of apples  after they have been peeled, cored, and cut small; boil them in the sirup with the grated peel and juice of a large lemon till they are reduced to pulp; put it into a mould. The following day serve it, turned out in a glass dish, with a rich custard.

STEWED SEVILLE ORANGES.

For three large Seville oranges, make a sirup with one pound of sugar; grate off the outer rind of the oranges, and boil them in water till tender; carefully scoop out the seeds, and stew them in the prepared sirup.

MERINGUES.

Beat one pound of pounded and sifted double-refined sugar with the whites of three eggs till quite light; when nearly so, add the juice of a lemon; whisk, till very light, five whites of eggs, and mix all together; drop it with a spoon upon white paper in the form of small oval cakes, dust them with a little sifted sugar, and bake them in a very slow oven. When they become lightly coloured upon the top, which may be in ten or twelve minutes, take them out; carefully take off a little of the top, fill them with whipt cream or strawberry jam, and put them together so as to resemble a whole egg, and serve them in a napkin. 

SUGAR RUFFS.

A pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar beaten well with the whites of three eggs, and flavoured with oil of cinnamon, lemons, or orange-flower water, and baked in the same way as the meringues, served in a napkin, or used to garnish dishes of preserves.

POTATO BISCUIT.

Beat separately the yolks and whites of fifteen eggs, and with the yolks beat a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and the grated peel of a lemon; when very light, add the whites, and sift in through a silk sieve half a pound of flour of potatoes; mix all lightly together, half fill paper cases, and strew over them roughly pounded sugar; put a piece of paper upon a board, place the paper cases upon it, and bake them in a moderate oven. To ornament them, put here and there upon the top a little red-currant jelly, and serve them.

TIPSY BREAD.

Pare off the crust, and cut into thin round slices of four or five inches, the crumb of a twopenny or threepenny roll; spread over each bit raspberry or strawberry jam, and place the slices one over the other pretty high in a glass dish, and pour over them as much sherry, sweetened with sugar, as the bread will soak in; stick round the sides, and over the top, blanched sweet almonds, cut like straws, and pour a custard round it. It may be made the day before, or two or three hours before dinner, and with the crumb of loaf bread.

TIPSY CAKE.

Pour over a spunge cake, made in the form of a porcupine, as much white wine as it will absorb, and stick it all over with blanched sweet almonds, cut like straws; or pour wine in the same manner over a thick slice of spunge cake, cover the top of it with preserved strawberries or raspberries, and stick cut almonds all round it.

LEMON SPUNGE.

Boil half an ounce of isinglass in a pint of water till dissolved; strain it, and the following day add the juice of two lemons, and the grated peel of one; rub through a hair-sieve into the isinglass a good quantity of raspberry jam, that has stood before the fire some time, the beaten whites of three eggs, and whisk it all together, till like a spunge; put it into an earthen mould, set it in a cold place for some hours, and turn it out. Any other sort of preserve may be used, and if made with only orange or lemon juice, sweeten it with sugar, or make it with orange jelly which may have been left the day before.

ANOTHER LEMON SPUNGE.

Boil an ounce of isinglass in a pint and a half of water, and when it is half wasted, strain it, and let it stand till quite cold; then mix with it the juice of three lemons, the whites of three eggs, and pounded sugar to sweeten it. Whisk it about twenty minutes, when it may be put into a shape; and if required, will be ready to be turned out in an hour or two. The white of one egg only may be used.

RASPBERRY SPUNGE.

Dissolve in a little water three quarters of an ounce of isinglass; add to it three quarters of a pint of cream, and the same proportion of new milk, nearly half a pint of raspberry jelly, and the juice of a lemon. Whisk it well one way till it becomes thick, and looks like spunge, then put it into an earthenware mould, and turn it out the next day.

CAKE SANDWICHES. 

Cut a spunge cake, a few days old, as for bread sandwiches, and spread strawberry jam or currant jelly over them.

A TRIFLE.

Add a pint of rich cream a tea-cupful of white wine sweetened with pounded loaf sugar; whisk it well, and as the froth rises, lay it upon a sieve placed over a deep dish; as it drains, pour the cream into the pan in which it is whisked till all is done; dip some spunge biscuit, ratafia cakes, or Savoy biscuit, into sweet wine and a little brandy; pour over them a rich boiled custard, and when quite cold, lay on the whipt cream, piled as high as possible. Coloured comfits may be strewed over the top.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE TRIFLE.

Mix three table-spoonfuls of white wine, and one of sugar, with a pint and a half of thick cream; whisk it, and take off as much froth as will heap upon the dish, into which lay some pieces of spunge cake, or some spunge biscuit, soaked with sweet wine, and covered with preserved strawberries, or any other fruit; pile the froth upon this, and pour the remainder of the cream into the bottom of the dish; garnish with flowers.

A LARGE SYLLABUB.

One pound of ratafia cakes pounded and steeped in two bottles of port wine, one of claret, and one of brandy, the grated peel and juice of two lemons, one large nutmeg grated, and two ounces of sweet almonds, blanched and pounded with a little rose water, and pounded sugar sufficient to make it sweet – Put all these ingredients, well mixed, into a large china bowl, or bowls of an equal size, and let the milk of a good cow be milked upon them; add a little rich cream and sifted loaf sugar, and cover it to keep it warm. It may be served out into glasses with a silver ladle.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE LARGE SYLLABUB.

A large glass of Madeira, one of rich sweet wine, and half a one of ratafia, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the grated peel of a large lemon, the juice of two, and a little pounded cinnamon; stir it altogether till the sugar be dissolved, and add a quart of rich cream; whisk it well; lay some macaroons into the bottom of a dish, and pile the frothed syllabub high upon it. It may be kept nine or ten days, and is better the third or fourth than when first made.

SOLID SYLLABUB.

A quarter of a pint of mountain, the same of white wine, the grated peel of two, and juice of one lemon; sweeten, and add it to a quart of rich cram; whisk it for an hour, and put it into glasses. It will keep a week in cold weather.

WHIPT SYLLBUB.

Mix together half a glass of brandy, a little lemon juice, and grated peel, with sugar enough to sweeten the whole; stir it into a pint of thick cream, and add the well-beaten whites of six eggs; whisk it for an hour, and put the froth, as it rises, upon a sieve to drain; put a little port and sweet wine into glasses, and fill them up with the froth.

COMMON SYLLABUB.

Half a pint of currant, the same of port or white wine, half a grated nutmeg, and the peel of a lemon; sweeten well with pounded loaf or good brown sugar, and mix it together in a china bowl, and when the sugar dissolves, milk upon it three or four pints of milk. Serve it when cold.

TO PRESERVE LEMONS FOR EIGHT OR TEN MONTHS.

The lemons must be perfectly fresh and sound, and free from every blemish. Put into a box a layer of earth, previously sifted, and made sufficiently damp for corn to spring in; strew over it a little barley, and place the lemons on it so as not to touch each other, and again put a layer of earth and barley; do this till all the lemons are packed, and taking care they be entirely covered with the earth. The box must be kept in a cellar, or some damp place, to prevent the earth becoming too dry.

TO PRESERVE LEMON JUICE.

Squeeze, and strain a pint of lemon juice; put into a china basin one pound of double-refined sugar finely pounded and sifted, add the lemon juice, and stir it with a silver spoon till the sugar be perfectly dissolved. Bottle it, and cork it tightly; seal the cork, or tie bladder over it, and keep it in a dry cool place.

TO PURIFY LEMON JUICE.

To one quart of strained lemon juice, add one ounce of well-burned and finely-pounded charcoal; in twelve hours filter it through filtering paper, and put it into small phials, which cork tightly, and keep in a cool place; a thick crust will form beneath the cork, and the mucilage will fall to the bottom. Hang up the peels, and when dried, keep them in a paper bag.

COLOURING FOR JELLIES, CREAMS, ICES, AND CAKES.

Boil very slowly in a gill of water, till reduced to one half, twenty grains of cochineal, the same quantity of alum and of cream of tartar finely pounded; strain, and keep it in a small phial.

For yellow, use an infusion of saffron.

For green, wash well, and pull into small bits, a handful of spinach leaves; put them into a loosely-covered sauce-pan; let them boil for a few minutes, and then express the juice.


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