Check all the Clans that have DNA Projects. If your Clan is not in the list there's a way for it to be listed. Electric Scotland's Classified Directory An amazing collection of unique holiday cottages, castles and apartments, all over Scotland in truly amazing locations.

Click here to get a Printer Friendly Page

THE PRACTICE OF COOKERY
CHAPTER XV -
CAKES, BISCUITS, AND BREAD


PREPARATORY REMARKS.

The currants and raisins should be prepared as directed under the Preparatory Remarks on Puddings, Pies, and Tarts; and the flour dried before the fire on a large sheet of white paper, then sifted and weighed. Almonds should be blanched by pouring hot water over them, and, after standing some minutes, taking off the skin, then throwing them into rose or cold water. When not pounded, they should be cut lengthwise into thin bits.

Sugar should be roughly pounded, rolled with a bottle upon white paper, and then sifted. All spices, after being well dried at the fire, should be finely pounded and sifted. Lemon and orange peel must be pared very thin, and pounded with a little sugar.

The butter, after being weighed, should be laid into cold water, or washed in rose water, and if salt, be well washed in several waters.

The yolks and whites of eggs should be separately and long beaten, then strained; two whisks should be kept exclusively for that purpose, as the whites especially require to be managed with the greatest care. A horn spoon should be used for mixing those cakes which are not directed to be beaten with the hand.

To make cakes light, sal volatile, or smelling salts, may be added immediately before putting them into the oven, allowing, to a spunge cake, made of one pound of flour, one tea-spoonful; and two or three to a large plum cake.

PLUM CAKE.

Two pounds of sifted and dried flour, one pound and a half of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, two pounds of nicely-cleaned and dried currants, half a pound of stoned and chopped raisins, half a pound of sweetmeats, one nutmeg grated, the weight of it in pounded cinnamon and mace, half a pound of almonds blanched and cut small, fourteen eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately, the yolks with three table-spoonfuls of rose or orange-flower water. These ingredients being prepared, with the hand beat to a cream two pounds of fresh butter; add the sugar by degrees, and then the yolks of the eggs, the whites, the flour, the spice, the almonds, the fruit, and sweetmeats, and lastly, mix in a glass of brandy; beat it all well together; butter the hoop or frame, and pour in the cake, and put it into a moderate oven. It will take between three and four hours to bake.

FROST, OR ICING, FOR CAKES.

Beat till very light the whites of four eggs, and add gradually three quarters of a pound of double-refined sugar, pounded and sifted through a lawn sieve; mix in the juice of half a lemon; beat it till very light and white; place the cake before the fire, pour over it the icing, and smooth over the top and sides with the back of a spoon.

POUND CAKE.

Take one pound of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of sifted loaf sugar, and of fresh butter washed in rose water; the well-beaten yolks of twelve, and the whites of six eggs; then with the hand beat the butter to a cream; by degrees add the sugar, then the eggs and the flour; beat it all well together for an hour. Bake it in a tin pan buttered, or in small ones in a quick oven. One ounce and a half of caraway seeds and a quarter of a pint of brandy may be added to this cake.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE POUND CAKE.

Take of dried and sifted flour, sifted loaf sugar, fresh butter, cleaned and dried currants, one pound each, and twelve eggs; then whisk the yolks and whites of the eggs separately, while another person with the hand beats the butter to a cream; and as the froth rises upon the eggs, add it to the butter, and continue so doing till it is all beaten in; mix the flour and sugar together, and add them by degrees; the last thing, mix in the currants, together with a glass of brandy. It will require to be beaten during a whole hour. Bake it in a buttered tin.

SPUNGE CAKE.

Take sixteen ounces of finely-pounded loaf sugar, the same quantity of eggs, and twelve ounces of dried and sifted flour; then whisk the eggs, yolks and whites, nearly half an hour; beat in the sugar with a horn spoon, and, just before it is to be put into a buttered tin, stir in the flour lightly, adding a few caraway seeds. Bake it for one hour.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE A SPUNGE CAKE.

Take the juice and grated rind of a lemon, twelve eggs, twelve ounces of finely-pounded loaf sugar, the same of dried and sifted flour; then with a horn spoon beat the yolks of ten of the eggs, add the sugar by degrees, and beat it till it will stand when dropped from the spoon; put in at separate times the two other eggs, yolks and whites; whisk the ten whites for eight minutes, and mix in the lemon juice, and when quite stiff, take as much as the whisk will lift, and put it upon the yolks and sugar, which must be beaten all the time; mix in lightly the flour and grated peel, and pour it all gradually over the whites; stir it together, and bake it in a buttered tin, or in small tins; do not more than half fill them.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE SPUNGE CAKE.

Three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar, a quarter of a pint of water, boil the sugar and water, skim it well; six well-beaten eggs, pour in the sugar boiling hot, whisk it till cold; seven ounces of flour well dried, mixed in gradually with the grated peel of a lemon. The above should be put into a cake tin, well buttered and lined with buttered paper. It must be immediately put into a moderate oven, and baked three quarters of an hour. This spunge cake will keep moist and good for weeks.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE SPUNGE CAKE.

Take one pound of dried flour, three quarters of a pound of finely-pounded loaf sugar, seven eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately, the grated peel and juice of a lemon a table-spoonful of rose water, and one of brandy, and half an ounce of caraway seeds dried and pounded; beat all for an hour with the hand; butter a tin, line it with paper also buttered, put in the cake, and sift pounded sugar over the top. Bake it for an hour. Potato flour may be substituted for wheat flour in this and the other spunge cakes.

SCOTS SEED CAKE.

Take one pound and a half of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of fresh butter washed in rose water, and of finely-pounded loaf sugar; six ounces of blanched sweet almonds, three quarters of a pound of candied orange-peel, half a pound of citron, all cut into thin narrow strips; one nutmeg grated, and a tea-spoonful of pounded caraway seeds, fifteen eggs, the yolks and whites separately beaten; then with the hand beat the butter to a cream, add the sugar, and then the eggs gradually; mix in the flour a little at a time, and then the sweetmeats, almonds, and spice, and lastly, stir in a glass of brandy; butter the hoop or tin pan, and pour in the cake so as nearly to fill it; smooth it over the top, and strew over it caraway comfits. Bake it in a moderate oven; it must not be moved or turned till nearly done, as shaking it will occasion the sweetmeats to sink to the bottom.

A CAKE.

Take two pounds and a half of dried and sifted flour, the same of well-cleaned and dried currants, two pounds of fresh butter, two of finely-pounded and sifted loaf sugar, a nutmeg grated, a tea-spoonful of pounded cinnamon, one ounce of citron and candied orange-peel cut small, the yolks of sixteen, and the whites of ten eggs, beaten separately; then with the hand beat the butter to a cram, and add the sugar, then the eggs by degrees, and the flour in the same way, and then the currants, sweetmeats, and spice, one glass of orange-flower water, and one of brandy. Butter a tin pan, line it with white paper buttered, put in the cake, and bake it in a moderate oven four hours.

ORCHESTON CAKE.

Rub into three pounds of flour one pound of butter. To the well-beaten yolks of ten, and the whites of five eggs, add three table-spoonfuls of yeast and some warm milk, and stir it into the flour; beat it for half an hour, till of the consistence of a thick batter, adding more milk if it be too stiff. Cover it over, and set it before the fire to rise, for two hours, then add one pound of stoned raisins, one pound of nicely-cleaned currants, one pound and a quarter of good brown sugar, two ounce of citron, and two ounces of candied lemon-peel cut small, one nutmeg grated, and a glass of brandy. Beat all these ingredients well together for half an hour, and bake in a buttered tin three hours.

TUNBRIDGE CAKES.

Rub two ounces of butter into half a pound of dried flour; add a few caraway seeds, and a quarter of a pound of pounded loaf sugar; mix it to a stiff paste with a little water, roll it out very thin, cut it into round cakes with a glass or the top of a dredging box, prick them with a fork, and bake them upon floured tins.

BRIGHTON CAKES.

With one pound of dried and sifted flour, mix half a pound of sifted loaf sugar, three ounces of sweet, and one ounce of bitter almonds pounded with a little rose water, and, if approved, four ounces of cleaned currants; stir into this half a pound of fresh butter, beaten to a cream; mix it well together. The cakes may be baked in very small tins, or dropped in rough knobs upon floured tins.

SPUNGE BISCUITS.

Beat together, for half an hour, four well-beaten eggs, and half a pound of finely-pounded loaf sugar; then mix in lightly six ounces of dried and sifted flour, and the grated peel of a lemon, or a tea-spoonful of essence of lemon, with a table-spoonful of rose water. Flour the pans, fill them half full, and sift pounded sugar over them. Bake them in a quick oven, Potato flour may be substituted for wheat flour.

TEA CAKES.

With a pound of flour rub half a pound of butter; add the beaten yolks of two, and the white of one egg, a quarter of a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and a few caraway seeds; mix it to a paste with a little warm milk, cover it with a cloth, and let it stand before the fire for nearly an hour; roll out the paste, and cut it into round cakes with the top of a glass, and bake them upon floured tins.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE TEA CAKES.

Make into a paste half a pound of flour, a quarter of a pound of butter, six ounces of pounded loaf sugar, the grated peel of a large lemon, the yolk and white of one egg, separately beaten; roll it out, cut it into cakes, brush them over with the white of an egg, and sift pounded sugar over them. Bake upon tins in a quick oven.

SIMPLE CAKES.

Rub lightly into half a pound of dried flour a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and a quarter of a pound of sifted loaf sugar; make it into a paste with a beaten egg, roll it out thin, cut it into round cakes, and bake them upon tins. They may be baked upon a girdle, putting the cakes upon white paper, and a tin cover over them.

MADELON CAKES.

Take three quarters of a pound of dried and sifted flour, one pound of eggs, and one of pounded and sifted sugar; then beat the eggs well, add the sugar, flour, and grated peel of two lemons, two table-spoonfuls of brandy, and one pound of oiled butter stirred in, the last thing; with a spoon, nearly fill small tins dusted with flour.

FRENCH BISCUIT.

Weigh five eggs, and their weight in dried and sifted flour, and in finely-pounded loaf sugar; beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and by degrees beat in the sugar and the flour, and then add the beaten yolks; with a spoon, half fill yellow tea-cups, previously rubbed with butter, and sift loaf sugar over the top. Bake them in a quick oven. Or, drop the biscuit in a round form upon sheets of white paper buttered; sift sugar over them.

SUGAR BISCUITS.

The weight of eight eggs in finely-pounded loaf sugar, and of four in dried flour; beat separately the whites and yolks; with the yolks beat the sugar for half an hour, then add the whites and the flour, and a little grated nutmeg, lemon-peel, or pounded cinnamon. Bake them in yellow tea-cups, or drop them upon paper, as the French biscuits.

SCOTS CHRISTMAS BUN.

Take four pounds of raisins stoned, two and a half of currants well cleaned and dried, half a pound of almonds blanched, of candied orange and lemon-peel a quarter of a pound each, cut small; of pounded cloves, Jamaica pepper, and ginger, half an ounce each, four pounds of flour, and twenty-two ounces of butter. Then rub the butter with the flour, till well mixed together; add a little warm water, and a quarter of a pint of fresh good yeast, and work it into a light smooth paste; cut off nearly one-third of the paste, to form the sheet or case, and lay it aside; with the rest work up the fruit, sweetmeats, and spices; make it into a round form like a thick cheese. Roll out the sheet of paste, lay the bun in the centre, and gather it all round, closing it at the bottom, by wetting the edges of the paste, and cutting it so as to lie quite flat. Turn it up, and run a wire or small skewer through from the top to the bottom every here and there, and prick the top with a fork. Double and flour a sheet of grey paper, and lay the bun upon it; bind a piece round the sides, also doubled and floured, to keep the bun in a proper shape. Bake it in a moderate oven.

SUGAR CAKES.

Take half a pound of dried flour, the same quantity of fresh butter washed in rose water, and a quarter of a pound of sifted loaf sugar; then mix together the flour and sugar; rub in the butter, and add the yolk of an egg beaten with a table-spoonful of cream; make it into a paste, roll, and cut it into small round cakes, which bake upon a floured tin.

HONEY CAKES.

One pound and a half of dried and sifted flour, three quarters of a pound of honey, half a pound of finely-pounded loaf sugar, a quarter of a pound of citron, and half an ounce of orange-peel cut small, of pounded ginger and cinnamon, three quarters of an ounces. Melt the sugar with the honey, and mix in the other ingredients; roll out the paste, and cut it into small cakes of any form.

RICE CAKE.

Twelve eggs, the yolks and whites beaten well, and separately; one pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, three quarters of a pound of ground rice, one quarter of a pound of flour. Beat all these ingredients together for half an hour, and just before putting it into a well-buttered cake tin, add twenty or thirty drops of essence of lemons, and three or four tea-spoonfuls of caraway seeds. It may be baked in small tins, and without caraway seeds.

RICE CAKES

Take the weight of four eggs in sifted rice flour and finely-pounded loaf sugar, half that weight of fresh butter, washed in rose water, and beaten to a cream; whisk the eggs, add to them the sugar, and beat these for twenty minutes; then mix in the butter and the rice flour, along with a few pounded bitter almonds, or the grated peel of a lemon, and beat all together for ten minutes. Butter small tins, half fill, and bake them in a quick oven.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE RICE CAKES.

Beat, till extremely light, the yolks of nine eggs; add half a pound of sifted loaf sugar, and the same quantity of sifted rice flour; melt half a pound of fresh butter, and mix it with the eggs, sugar, and flour, along with a few pounded bitter almonds; half fill small tins buttered with the mixture, and bake in a quick oven.

CURRANT CAKES.

Take half a pound of cleaned and dried currants, the same quantity of dried and sifted flour, a quarter of a pound of pounded sugar, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, four yolks, and three whites of eggs, both well beaten, and a little grated nutmeg or pounded cinnamon; then beat the butter to a cream; add the sugar, and then the eggs and the flour; beat these well for twenty minutes, mix in the currants and the grated nutmeg. Drop the cakes in a round form upon buttered paper, or bake them in small tins in a quick oven. 

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CURRANT CAKES.

Take six ounces of currants, the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, a little grated nutmeg, half a pound of butter, and three quarters of a pound of dried and sifted flour; rub the butter with the flour till they be well mixed, then add the other ingredients, and bind them with three beaten yolks of eggs, and two or three spoonfuls of rose or orange-flower water; roll it out, and cut it into round cakes with the top of a wine glass or a tin.

WAFERS.

Mix, with six table-spoonfuls of dried and sifted flour, nearly a pint of thick cream, the well-beaten yolks of four eggs, three table-spoonfuls of sifted loaf sugar, and one of orange-flower water; beat all these well together. Heat the wafer-irons, and put into them a table-spoonful of the batter; turn the irons, that the cake may be baked equally, and while hot, roll them round a stick. When cold, they will be very crisp.

RICH CAKE.

To two pounds and a half of dried and sifted flour, allow the same quantity of fresh butter washed with rose water, two pounds of finely-pounded loaf sugar, three pounds of cleaned and dried currants, one nutmeg grated, half a pound of sweetmeats cut small, a quarter of a pound of blanched almonds pounded with a little rose water, and twenty eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately. The butter must be beaten with the hand till it become like cream; then add the sugar, and by degrees the eggs; after these, the rest of the ingredients, mixing in at the last the currants, with a tea-cupful of brandy, and nearly as much orange-flower water. This mixture must be beaten together rather more than an hour, then put into a cake-pan, which has previously been buttered and lined with buttered paper; fill it rather more than three parts full. It should be baked in a moderate oven for three hours, and then cooled gradually by at first letting it stand some time at the mouth of the oven.

ALMOND CAKE.

Blanch half a pound of sweet, and three ounces of bitter almonds; pound them to a paste in a mortar with orange-flower water; add half a pound of sifted loaf sugar, and a little brandy; whisk separately, for half an hour, the whites and yolks of twenty eggs, add the yolks to the almonds and sugar, and then stir in the whites, and beat them all well together. Butter a tin pan, sift bread raspings over it, put the cake into it, over the top of which strew sifted loaf sugar. Bake in a quick oven for half or three quarters of an hour.

WATER CAKES.

Mix together three quarters of a pound of sifted loaf sugar, and one pound of dried and sifted flour, and some caraway seeds; make it into a stiff paste, with the white of an egg beaten with a little water; roll it out very thin, cut the cakes round with the top of a glass or tin, prick them with a fork, and bake them upon buttered tins.

CARAWAY SEEDS.

Mix half a pound of sifted loaf sugar with a pound of flour and a quarter of a pound of butter, add some caraway seeds; make it into a stiff paste, with three well-beaten eggs, and a little rose water; roll it out thin, cut it into round cakes, prick them with a fork, and bake them upon floured tins in a quick oven.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CARAWAY CAKES.

Three quarters of a pound of flour, half a pound of butter well rubbed into it, a quarter of a pound of sifted loaf sugar, and some caraway seeds; make these into a stiff paste with a little cold water, roll it out two or three times, cut it into round cakes, prick them, and bake them upon floured tins. For a change, currants may be substituted for the caraway seeds.

BANBURY CAKES.

Strew some nicely-cleaned currants over a piece of puff paste; roll it out, cut it into round cakes with the top of a dredging box; bake them upon floured tins, and the moment they are taken out of the oven, sift sugar over them, and put them upon a dish to cool. After making pies, they may be made with the remainder of the paste.

ROUT CAKES.

Rub into one pound of flour half a pound of fresh butter washed in rose water; of brown sifted loaf sugar, sweetmeats cut small, and well-cleaned currants, a quarter of a pound each; mix all the ingredients with three well-beaten eggs, and add one or two table-spoonfuls of brandy. Drop it in rough knobs upon floured tins, and bake them in a quick oven.

RICH CURRANT CAKE.

Have ready three pound of dried and sifted flour, two pounds and a half of fresh butter, one pound of sifted loaf sugar, one pound of citron and lemon-peel cut small, three quarters of a pound of blanched sweet almonds cut into thin bits, and steeped in rose water, five pounds of well-cleaned currants, one nutmeg grated, half an ounce of pounded mace, the yolks of fifteen, and the whites of seven eggs beaten separately, half a pint of fresh yeast, a pint and a half of cream, an eighth of a pint of orange-flower water; then mix the spice with the flour; melt the butter and cream together, and when cold, stir them into the flour; add the yeast to the beaten eggs, and strain them into the flour, then mix in the rest of the ingredients, and beat them well together. Butter a cake-pan, line it with buttered paper, pour in the cake, and put it immediately into the oven. As soon as it rises, and is a little coloured, cover the top with paper. It will take nearly three hours to bake.

MACAROONS.

Beat to a froth the whites of eight eggs; two pounds of finely-pounded and sifted loaf sugar, one pound of blanched sweet almonds, which must be pounded to a paste with rose water. Beat all these together till they become a thick paste, then drop it from a spoon upon wafer paper or tins, and bake them in a slow oven.

RATAFIA BISCUIT.

Beat to a froth the whites of six eggs; add two pounds of sifted loaf sugar, half a pound of blanched sweet almonds, and the same quantity of bitter almonds, pounded to a paste. Beat all well together, then drop it upon wafer paper, and bake in a slow oven.

SMALL ALMOND CAKES.

One pound of butter beaten to a cream, half a pound of finely-pounded and sifted loaf sugar, half a pound of dried and sifted flour, and the same quantity of blanched sweet almonds cut into thin small bits, one well-beaten egg, and a little rose water, must be mixed well together, and with a spoon dropped upon wafer paper or tins, and then baked.

THE QUEEN’S TEA CAKES.

Mix together half a pound of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, the weight of two eggs in fresh butter, the grated peel of a lemon, and a little salt; beat the two eggs with a little rose water, and with them make the ingredients into a paste; roll it out, cut it into round cakes, and bake them upon floured tins.

POTATO-FLOUR CAKE.

Mix half a pound of potato-flour, very much dried, with three quarters of a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar; roll it with a bottle. Beat separately the yolks and whites of eight new-laid eggs, and then mix them together. Whisk all the ingredients till quite light; heat the tin shape well, butter it, as also the paper, put in the cake, and bake it in a moderate oven for half an hour. If properly done, it will rise high and be light.

COMMON CAKE.

Take two quarts of flour, mix with it three quarters of a pound of butter, a tea-cupful of fresh yeast, one pint of milk, nine well-beaten eggs, two pounds of well-cleaned currants, one pound and a half of good brown sugar, the grated peel of a lemon, and one nutmeg; a glass of brandy must be stirred in just before it be put into a buttered tin. Bake it for two hours or more.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE COMMON CAKE.

Rub into one pound of flour a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; mix, with two well-beaten eggs, and a table-spoonful of fresh yeast, as much warm milk as will make the four into a very thick batter. Let this remain near the fire, covered with a cloth, for an hour; then mix into it six ounces of good brown sugar, and nine ounces of well-cleaned and dried currants; let it stand again for half an hour, and bake it in a buttered tin for an hour. 

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE A COMMON CAKE.

With the hand, beat three quarters of a pound of fresh butter to a cream, and mix it with as much dough as would make a half-quartern loaf; add eight ounces of finely-pounded loaf, or good brown sugar, and the same quantity of well-cleaned currants, a little pounded cinnamon, or grated nutmeg; beat all well together, and bake it in a buttered tin.

FRENCH CAKE.

Twelve eggs, the yolks, and whites beaten well and separately, one pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, the grated peel of a large lemon, half a pound of sifted and dried flour, the same weight of sifted and dried ground rice, four ounces of sweet, and one of bitter almonds, pounded in a mortar together, with a table-spoonful of orange-flower water. Mix all these ingredients gradually, and beat them well. Paper the pan, and bake the cake for one hour.

BOURBON CAKE.

Beat well and separately the yolks of ten, and the whites of five eggs; grate and sift a pound of loaf sugar; grate the peel of two bitter oranges; blanch and pound, with a little rose water, half a pound of sweet almonds; whisk all these ingredients together for half an hour; and lastly, mix in half a pound of died and sifted flour; lay it about three inches deep into a hoop, and bake it in a moderate oven for one hour and a quarter. Immediately upon taking the cake out of the frame, ice it over the top and sides.

IRISH SEED CAKE.

Beat to a cream eight ounces of fresh butter, and a quarter of a pint of rose water, putting in a table-spoonful of sifted loaf sugar, and then nine well-beaten eggs; add twelve ounces of flour, and three of flour of rice dried and sifted, a quarter of a pound of blanched and pounded sweet or bitter almonds, a tea-spoonful of essence of lemon, and one ounce of caraway seeks; beat all these well together; bake it in a  cake-tin, which must be buttered, and lined with paper also buttered. It will require about one hour and a half to bake in a quick oven. It may be made without the almonds or the essence of lemon.

BAIRN BRACK.

To three pounds of dried flour, allow one pound of fresh butter, one pound of good brown sugar, two ounces of caraway seeds, eight well-beaten eggs, three table-spoonfuls of fresh yeast, and some grated nutmeg; dissolve the butter in a pint of milk, so as to make the whole into a dough, not very stiff; work it well; cover it with a cloth, and sit it before the fire to rise; when well risen, bake it in a buttered tin. When it becomes dry, it may be toasted and eaten with butter.

SHORT BREAD.

For two pound of sifted flour allow one pound of butter, salt or fresh; a quarter of a pound of candied orange and lemon-peel, of pounded loaf sugar, blanched sweet almonds, and caraway comfits, a quarter of a pound each; cut the lemon, the orange-peel, and almonds, into small thin bits, and mix them with a pound and a half of the flour, a few of the caraway comfits, and the sugar; melt the butter, and when cool, pour it clear from the sediment into the flour, at the same time mixing it quickly. With the hands, form it into a large round of nearly an inch thick, using the remainder of the flour to make it up with; cut it into four, and with the finger and thumb pinch each bit neatly all round the edge; prick them with a fork, and strew the rest of the caraway comfits over the top. Put the pieces upon white paper dusted with flour, and then upon tins. Bake them in a moderate oven.

PLAIN SHORT BREAD.

The same proportions of flour and butter must be used as in the above receipt for short bread; this must be mixed together, rolled out, but not made quite so thick as in the rich kind; but in the same form, pricked with a fork, and pinched all round. A little sugar may be added.

QUEEN CAKES.

Prepare eight ounces of fresh butter beaten to a cream, six ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, half a pound of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of cleaned and dried currants, four well-beaten eggs, a little grated nutmeg, pounded cinnamon, and a few pounded bitter almonds; then add the sugar to the butter, put in the eggs by degrees, after that the flour and the other ingredients; beat all well together for half an hour, and put it into small buttered tins, nearly filling them, and strew over the top finely-pounded loaf sugar. Bake them in a pretty brisk oven.

SHREWSBURY CAKES.

Mix, with half a pound of fresh butter washed in rose water, and beaten to a cream, the same quantity of dried and sifted flour, seven ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, half an ounce of caraway seeds, and two well-beaten eggs; make them into a paste; roll it thin; cut it into round cakes; prick them, and bake them upon floured tins.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE SHREWSBURY CAKES.

Rub into a pound of dried and sifted flour, half a pound of fresh butter, seven ounces of sifted loaf sugar, and the same quantity of cleaned and dried currants, and a little grated nutmeg; make it into a paste with a little water, two table-spoonfuls of rose or orange-flower water; roll it out, and cut it into round cakes; prick them, an bake them upon tins dusted with flour.

MONTROSE CAKES.

Of dried and sifted flour, pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and of fresh butter, one pound each will be required, also twelve well-beaten eggs, three quarters of a pound of cleaned and dried currants; beat the butter to a cream with the sugar; add the eggs by degrees, and then the flour and currants, with two table-spoonfuls of brandy, one of rose water, and half a grated nutmeg; beat all well together for twenty or thirty minutes, when it is to be put into small buttered tins, half filling them, and baking them in a quick oven. The currants may be omitted.

RICE CAKE.

Whisk ten eggs for half an hour; add to them half a pound of flour of rice, half a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and the grated peel of two lemons; mix this into half a pound of fresh butter, previously beaten to a cream. Bake the cake in a buttered tin.

LITTLE RICE CAKES.

Whisk well six yolks and two whites of eggs; then with a horn spoon beat in six ounces of finely-pounded loaf sugar; add eight ounces of sifted ground rice, and two table-spoonfuls of orange-flower or rose water, or the grated peel of a lemon, and just before the mixture is to be put into the tins, stir into it six ounces of fresh butter melted; dust the patty-pans with flour, or rub them with butter; let them be half filled, and bake the cakes in a quick oven.

WHITE CAKE.

Take of dried and sifted flour, of fresh butter, and of finely-pounded loaf sugar, one pound each; five well-beaten eggs, a quarter of a pint of cream, of candied orange and lemon-peel, cut small, three quarters of an ounce each; one ounce of caraway seeds, half a grated nutmeg, a glass of brandy, and a little rose water; then beat the butter to a cream, and add all the other ingredients to it, and at the last mix in one table-spoonful of fresh yeast; let the cake rise before the fire for half an hour. Bake it in a buttered tin. Instantly upon taking it out of the oven, with a feather brush the top all over with the beaten white of an egg, and then sift loaf sugar upon it. Let it stand at the mouth of the oven to harden.

RICH CAKES.

Mix together one pound of flour, half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, and half a pound of melted butter; add a quarter of a pound of currants, and a glass of brandy, or of raisin wine; roll out the paste, cut the cakes with a small round tin, and bake them upon a floured tin.

CHESHIRE CAKE.

Beat for half an hour the yolks of eight, and the whites of five eggs; add half a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, a quarter of a pound of dried and sifted flour, and the grated peel of a small lemon; beat all together, and bake it in a floured tin.

LITTLE CAKES.

Beat a pound of fresh butter to a cream, and add to it one pound of pounded loaf sugar, a little pounded cinnamon and nutmeg, the grated peel of a lemon, three well-beaten eggs, one pound of currants, one pound of flour, and a little sweet wine. Work it altogether, roll it out, cut it into little cakes; brush some sweet wine over them with a feather, sift grated sugar over them, and bake them upon tins. These cakes will keep good for a year.

LITTLE ALMOND CAKES.

Beat, with a three-pronged fork, the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth. Blanch and pound with a little sugar, two ounces of sweet, and one ounce of bitter almonds; mix them with six ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and rub it through a cullender; then beat it with the eggs, and add two ounces of dried and sifted ground rice; beat all well together, and when very light, drop it from a spoon in small round cakes upon a sheet of tin, and bake them in a slow oven.

LITTLE CINNAMON AND CLOVE CAKES.

To the well-beaten white of an egg, add dried, pounded, and sifted loaf sugar, till it be thick enough to cut into cakes, with small tin shapes. Flavour the beaten egg and sugar with two or three drops of essential oil of cinnamon, or of cloves, and bake the cakes upon tins in a slow oven.

FLEMISH WAFERS.

Put into a deep pan half a pound of flour; strain and mix with it half a pint of warmed milk, and two table-spoonfuls of fresh yeast; work the paste till it be soft and smooth, and place it in a stove, or close to the fire, to rise; then add the beaten yolks of six eggs, half a pound of fresh butter beaten to a cream, and a lump of sugar which has been rubbed upon the peel of a lemon, and then pounded; last of all, beat in lightly the well-whisked whites of the eggs; again place the pan in a warm place, and it will rise to nearly double its bulk. Heat and rub the irons, which should be square, with a little butter; fill one side with the mixture, and close them; when one side is done, turn the other, and when of a fine colour, take out the wafers; put them upon a plate, and whilst hot, sift over this quantity a quarter of a pound of grated loaf sugar.

SPANISH CAKES.

Tub, till quite fine and smooth, one pound of butter with two pounds of flour; then add a pound of good brown sugar, rolled fine, and mix all together with four well-beaten eggs; break the paste into small bits or knobs, and bake them upon floured tins.

SMALL ROUT CAKES.

Rub into one pound of dried and sifted flour, half a pound of butter, six ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and the yolks of two well-beaten eggs; mix them all into a paste with a little rose water; divide the quantity, put a few dried currants or caraway seeds into one half; roll out the paste, cut it into small round cakes, and bake them upon buttered tins.

SUGAR BISCUITS.

Mix together one pound of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, ten well-beaten eggs, and a few pounded cloves. Drop this upon floured tins, and bake it.

HANDSCH KIRCHEN, OR GLOVE CAKE.

With flour, make into a paste thick enough to roll out, the beaten yolks of ten eggs, five table-spoonfuls of rich sweet cream, a little sugar, and some cardamoms; cut it into fanciful forms with small tins, and throw them into fresh boiling lard or butter; when of a light brown colour, drain them before the fire. If fried in butter, add a little water to the butter, and make it boiling hot.

CAKE WITHOUT BUTTER.

Take the weight of three eggs in sugar, and the weight of two in flour; when the five eggs are well beaten, gradually add the sugar, and then the flour, with a little grated lemon-peel, or a few caraway seeds. Bake it in a tin mould, in rather a quick oven.

COMMON CAKE.

One pound and a half of flour, one pound of good brown sugar, eight well-beaten eggs, and one ounce of caraway seeds, are to be mixed together; then add of fresh yeast, milk, and of water, one table-spoonful each. Let it stand a little time, and bake it in a floured tin.

PLUM CAKE.

To one pound of dried and sifted flour, allow three quarters of a pound of sifted loaf sugar, eight eggs, the yolks and whites separately beaten; three quarters of a pound of butter beaten to a cream, three pounded cloves, half a grated nutmeg, half a pound of cleaned and dried currants; add the sugar to the butter, and next the eggs by degrees, then the flour and spices. Beat all well together for nearly an hour; mix in the currants with the grated peel of a lemon, half a glass of white wine, and the same quantity of brandy; put it into a cake-pan lined with buttered paper; bake it in a moderate oven.

GATEAU A LA DAUPHINE.

Beat separately the whites and yolks of twenty eggs; to the yolks add a pound of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, the grated peel of one lemon, and two or three table-spoonfuls of orange-flower water; then stir in the whites, and lightly mix in half a pound of dried and sifted flour. Bake in a buttered tin, in a moderate oven.

GINGERBREAD CAKE.                   

Take two pound of treacle, two and a quarter of flour, of brown sugar and fresh butter three quarters of a pound each, four ounces of caraway seeds, the same quantity of candied orange-peel cut small, three ounces of finely-pounded ginger, four well-beaten eggs, and half an ounce of pearl ashes; beat the butter to a cream, and mix it with the rest of the ingredients; the next day work it well up, and bake it in a buttered tin. This quantity may be made into two cakes, and baked in a slow oven two hours.

GINGERBREAD NUTS.

Take one pound of dried and sifted flour, one pound of treacle, three ounces of brown sugar, four ounces of fresh butter, one ounce and a half of pounded and sifted ginger, of candied orange-peel and citron, cut small, three quarters of an ounce each: melt the butter with the treacle, and when it is about milk-warm, add it to the flour and other ingredients, and then mix all well together; with a spoon, drop the nuts upon buttered tins, and bake them.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE GINGERBREAD NUTS.

Dissolve a quarter of a pound of butter in three quarters of a pound of treacle; put it into a pan large enough to contain the rest of the ingredients, and when almost cold, stir in one pound of dried and sifted flour, half a pound of coarse brown sugar, half an ounce of caraway seeds, three quarters of an ounce of pounded ginger, and the grated peel of a lemon; mix all these well together, and let it stand till it be stiff, or till the following day; then make it into nuts, by pinching it into pieces with the finger and thumb. Bake them upon buttered tins in a quick oven. Half an ounce of coriander seeds may be added.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE GINGERBREAD NUTS.

Rub half a pound of butter into two pounds of flour; add one pound of coarse sugar, and one ounce of pounded ginger; mix all well together with one pound and two ounces of treacle; form it into nuts, or roll it out, and cut it into round cakes; bake them upon tins.

AMERICAN GINGERBREAD.

Take half a pound of fresh butter melted, one pound and a half of dried and sifted flour, the same quantity of brown sugar, a quarter of a pound of pounded ginger, nine eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately, one glass of rose water, and one of white wine; mix all these well together, and beat it for an hour; then with a spoon spread it over flat tin pans, about the thickness of a penny-piece; bake it of a light brown, and while warm, cut it into oblong pieces, and place them on end till cool, when they will be very crisp.

RICH GINGERBREAD CAKES.

To one pound of dried and sifted flour, allow half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, three quarters of a pound of fresh butter washed in rose water, one pound of treacle, one nutmeg grated, the weight of a nutmeg of pounded mace, and as much of pounded cinnamon, one ounce of pounded ginger, half an ounce of blanched sweet almonds, cut into long thin bits, and two well-beaten eggs. Melt the butter with the treacle, and when nearly cold, stir in the eggs and the rest of the ingredients; mix all well together, make it into round cakes, and bake them upon tins.

INDIAN GINGERBREAD.

Take twelve ounces of pounded loaf sugar, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, one pound of dried flour, two ounces of pounded ginger, and of cloves and cinnamon a quarter of an ounce each. Mix the ginger and spice with the flour; put the sugar and a small tea-cupful of water into a sauce-pan; when it is dissolved, add the butter, and as soon as it is melted, mix it with the flour and other things; work it up, and form the paste into cakes or nuts, and bake them upon tins.

HONEYCOMB GINGERBREAD.

Half a pound of flour, half a pound of the coarsest brown sugar, a quarter of a pound of butter, one dessert-spoonful of allspice, and double that quantity of ginger, half the peel of a lemon grated, and the whole of the juice. Mix all these ingredients together, adding about half a pound of treacle, so as to make a paste sufficiently thin to spread upon sheet tins. Beat it well, butter the tins, cut it into squares with a knife, the usual size of wafer biscuits, and roll each round the fingers as it is raised from the tin. This paste, put into a jar, and covered closely, will keep for a month; but the biscuits will be found best when newly baked.

BREAKFAST OR TEA CAKES.

Take one pound of flour, and mix it with half a pound of butter dissolved, together with a little cream, milk, or water, and half a tea-spoonful of salt; work it well, and roll it into round balls. Have wafer-irons ready heated, put into them a ball of the paste, press them, and hold the irons upon the fire for a minute or two.

SLIM CAKES FOR BREAKFAST OR TEA.

To one pound of flour, allow two beaten eggs, one ounce of butter, half a tea-spoonful of salt, and as much warmed milk as will make the whole into a pretty stiff paste; work it well, cover it over, and let it remain before the fire for half an hour; roll it out, and cut it into round cakes, with a small saucer or the top of the tumbler; do them in a nicely-cleaned frying-pan; dust them with a little flour. They may be baked upon a plate of iron, or what in Scotland is called a girdle.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CAKES FOR BREAKFAST OR TEA.

To one pound of flour, allow two beaten eggs, one table-spoonful of fresh yeast, and as much cream as will make them into a light dough; cover it over for an hour; make it into cakes, and bake them upon tins in a moderate oven.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE CAKES FOR BREAKFAST OR TEA.

Dissolved, in a half a pint of warm water, one ounce of fresh butter, mix it with two pounds of dried and sifted flour, and stir in lightly two large spoonfuls of fine fresh yeast; cover it with a cloth, and let it stand to rise; then make it up into rolls, place them upon floured tins, let them again stand to rise, and bake them in a quick oven.

SHORT CAKES.

Sift four pounds of oatmeal, and mix with it four pounds of treacle, half a pound of brown sugar, the same quantity of melted butter, and three quarters of an ounce of powdered ginger. Work it all well together, let it remain for twenty-four hours, and then make it into cakes.

PARLIAMENT CAKES.

Put into a sauce-pan two pound of treacle, and when it boils, add a quarter of a pound of butter, and pour it upon two pounds of flour; add a little alum, and a bit of pearl ash about the size of a nut, and an ounce of ginger. Work it well with the hand till quite smooth; let it stand a day and a night, then roll it out very thin, and cut it into oblong cakes.

OATMEAL CAKES.

One only should be made at a time, as the mixture dries quickly. Put two or three handfuls of meal into a bowl, and moisten it with water merely sufficient to form it into a cake; knead it out round and round with the hands upon the paste-board, strewing meal under and over it; it may be made as thin as a wafer, or thicker, according to taste, and put it on a hot iron plate, called a girdle. Bake it till it be a little brown on the under side, then take it off, and toast that side before the fire, which was uppermost on the girdle. The toaster is such as is commonly used for heating smoothing irons, having a back to support the cake. To make these cakes soft, they must not be toasted before the fire, but both sides done quickly on the girdle.

BARLEY-MEAL SCONS FOR BREAKFAST.

Boil a quart of good milk, add a tea-spoonful of salt, and stir it into barley-meal till quite thick; strew meal over the paste-board, roll out the paste quickly, cut the scons the size of a saucer, dust meal over, and bake them upon a girdle; turn them, as they are done, lay them one upon another to keep them soft. Serve them in a napkin.

GIRDLE CAKES.

Rub three ounces of fresh butter into one pound of flour, with half a tea-spoonful of salt; moisten with s sufficiency of sweet buttermilk to make it into a paste; roll it out, and cut it into cakes with a cup or tumbler, and bake them upon a girdle.

BATH BUNS.

To four pound of dried and sifted flour, allow one pound of fresh butter, three quarters of a pound of caraway comfits, the well-beaten yolks of four, and the whites of two eggs, six table-spoonfuls of cream, and the same quantity of fresh yeast. Melt the butter, mix it with the flour, and add the eggs, cream, and yeast, previously beaten together; cover it, and let it rise for twenty or thirty minutes, then shake in the caraway comfits, keeping a few to strew over the tops; form the buns, and bake them upon buttered tins.

BISCUIT.

Make as stiff a paste as possible of the finest flour, mixing it with cold water, and adding a little salt; beat it out with a rolling pin, cut it into pieces, lay them one over the other, and again beat it out; roll it very thin, cut it into biscuits, and prick them well with a fork. To make the Prince of Wales’ biscuit, roll the paste into small balls, and press it with a stamp.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BISCUIT.

Rub seven ounces of fresh butter into two pounds of flour, mix with it two large spoonfuls of yeast, cover it with a cloth, and let it stand an hour; then add as much warmed new milk as will make it into a paste as stiff as pie-crust; form it into biscuits of about an ounce and a half each; bake them in a quick oven. The following day, after bread has been baked, put them again into the oven, and let them remain for nearly three hours.

SWEET BISCUIT.

One pound of flour, half a pound of butter, the same quantity of finely-pounded sugar, and two eggs without being beaten; make it all into a very stiff paste with cold water, roll it out, and to form the biscuits, roll a bit of the paste into a ball about the size of the yolk of an egg, flatten it a little, and place them upon tins to bake.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE SWEET BISCUIT.

To one pound of flour, allow half a pound of sugar, two beaten eggs, a tea-spoonful of caraway seeds, and a quarter of a pound of melted butter; mix all well together, roll it out thin, and cut it into round biscuits; prick them, and bake them upon tins.

OLIVER’S BISCUIT.

Melt a quarter of a pound of fresh butter in half a pint of new milk; add a table-spoonful of fresh yeast, and stir it into one pound and a half of flour; knead it well, then wrap it in warm flannel, to remain for fifteen minutes; roll it out several times, and the last time about the thickness of a penny-piece; cut it into small biscuits, prick them well with a fork, and bake them in a slow oven till of a pale brown colour.

BISCUITS.

Dissolve half a pound of butter in half a pint of milk, and make it into a stiff paste with four pounds of flour; beat and work it perfectly smooth, roll it out very thin, stamp out the biscuit, prick them well with a fork, and bake them upon this in a quick oven.

LEMAN’S BISCUIT.

Sift and dry a pound of fine flour; rub into it a quarter of a pound of butter, two ounces of pounded and sifted loaf sugar, and a bit of volatile salt about the size of a nut; mix in it as much new milk warmed as will make it into a stiff paste; work it well together, and let it remain for two or three hours, and then roll it out, and make it into small square biscuits, and into round balls a little flattened; prick them with a fork, and bake them upon tins in a quick oven. Take care they do not become brown.

COLD HARBOUR BALLS.

Dissolve one ounce of butter in as much milk warmed as will make four pounds of flour into a stiff paste; about two pints may be required; add half a tea-spoonful of salt, one egg beaten together with a table-spoonful of yeast; mix it all well, cover it with a cloth, and let it remain before the fire for half an hour; then make it into small round balls, and bake them upon tins in a quick oven.

RUSKS 

To three pounds and a half of flour, allow half a pound of butter, the same quantity of pounded loaf sugar, and five spoonfuls of yeast; mix the flour and sugar together; melt the butter in two pints and a half of milk, and mix it with the flour, and then add the yeast and one beaten egg; work it well together; cover it, and let it stand for five or six hours; take it out of the pan, and form it into little rolls; place them upon tins, and let them rise for about an hour; bake them in a quick oven, and when they become brown, cut them through the middle or into three slices; put them again into the oven to brown and crisp.

MUFFINS.

Make two quarts of milk rather warmer than when it comes from the cow; then, with a horn or wooden spoon, mix with it about a tea-cupful of good fresh yeast; stir flour into it till it be as thick as a batter; cover it, and let it remain to rise for an hour, then take it out by spoonfuls, and drop it amongst flour, and let it remain for fifteen minutes; take them up, flatten them a little, and bake them upon a metal plate; when one side is a little brown, turn them. When to be eaten, toast them, and with a knife cut them a little all round, then pull them open and butter them.

SALLY LUNS OR BATH BREAKFAST CAKES.

Rub into two pounds of flour half a pound of butter, and mix with it one pint of milk a little warmed, a quarter of a pint of fresh yeast, four well-beaten eggs, and a tea-spoonful of salt; cover it, and let it stand before the fire to rise for three quarters of an hour; make it into thick cakes about the size of the inside of a dinner plate; bake them in a quick oven, then cut them into three, that the middle slice, as also the top and bottom, may be well buttered. Serve them hot.

TO MAKE BREAD.

To thirteen pounds of sifted flour, allow four quarts of lukewarm milk or water – in winter it must be warmer, but not scalding hot even in the coldest weather; put the milk into a wooden trough or large earthen pan; add a large table-spoonful of coarse salt; stir in a few handfuls of flour, and three quarters of a pint of beer yeast, or more if not very thick; then stir in flour till it be like a thick batter; throw some flour on the top, and set it before the fire. If the yeast be good, the mixture will rise in ten minutes to the top of the pan; then stir in some more flour, and replace it before the fire. When it has risen a second time, take out as much dough as will make the rolls, knead it about five minutes, form the rolls, prick them with a fork, and put them on a tin; place them before the fire to rise for ten minutes, and bake them in a pretty quick oven. The dough for the loaves must be kneaded for twenty minutes or half an hour. Form the loaves, and put them into tin pans, which may be rather more than half filled; prick them, and place them before the fire; when they have risen nearly to the top of the pans, they may be put into the oven and baked one hour. If a metal oven is used, it must be made moderately hot, that the bread may be well raised without being scorched.

The addition of an ounce of potato, to a pound of wheaten flour, will be found a great improvement to bread. When it is to be used, moisten it with a little cold water or milk, then pour into it a portion of the water, or milk, to be used for the baking, made nearly boiling hot; add the remainder of the liquid required, which should be milk-warm; and, when the whole is a proper heat, mix with it the yeast and flour, and proceed as before directed.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE BREAD.

Mix into six pounds of sifted flour, one ounce of salt, nearly half a pint of fresh sweet yeast as it comes from the brewery, and a sufficient quantity of warmed milk to make the whole into a stiff dough; work and knead it well upon a paste-board, on which a little flour has been strewed, for fifteen or twenty minutes; then put it into a deep pan, cover it with a warmed towel, set it before the fire, and let it rise for an hour and a half, or perhaps two hours; cut off a piece of this spunge or dough; knead it well for eight or ten minutes, together with flour merely sufficient to keep it from adhering to the board; put it into small tins, filling them three parts full; dent the rolls all round with a knife, and let them stand a few minutes before putting them into the oven. The remainder of the dough must then be worked up for loaves, and baked either in or out of a shape.

BROWN BREAD.

Either of the above receipts may be followed, allowing a little more yeast, less liquid, and kneading the dough for a longer time. It may be made of oatmeal, or of a mixture of wheat, barley, and rye flour, the proportion of wheat flour being doubled; but the finest brown bread is made of wheat ground over head.

STALE BREAD.

May be made nearly as good as when newly baked, by putting it into a cool oven for nearly an hour.

FRENCH BREAD.

With one pound of flour, rub two ounces of fresh butter. Mix, with three or four table-spoonfuls of lukewarm milk, one of fresh beer yeast, and a beaten egg; work this with the flour, and set it to rise before the fire for about an hour, then knead it like bread; make it into two cakes, and place them upon buttered tins; let them stand before the fire an hour and a half, and bake them in a quick oven for fifteen minutes.

A little sugar and a few caraway seeds may be added for a change. These cakes may be eaten hot.

ROLLS.

Dissolve two ounces of butter in one pint of new milk, and stir it into four pounds of flour, as also three table-spoonfuls of yeast, a tea-spoonful of salt, and the well-beaten whites of two eggs; cover the pan with a warmed towel, and set it before the fire to rise for half an hour, then work it one way for fifteen minutes; form it into rolls, place them upon tins, and let them rise for ten minutes before putting them into an oven.

FRENCH ROLLS.

Mix rather more than an ounce of coarse salt with eight pounds of sifted flour; make a hole in the middle, and pour in about half a pint of good yeast, the well-beaten whites of four eggs, and as much new milk warmed as will mix it to a middling stiffness; clap and work it down one way with the hands for half an hour, but do not knead it; cover it with a warmed towel, and let it rise before the fire for half an hour; take off the surface, which soon becomes hard, and put it aside to be made into a roll; work and clap the dough, form it into rolls, place them upon tins, and let them rise for ten minutes; bake them in a quick oven.

YEAST.

Beer yeast, which is the best for bread, should be strained through a hair-sieve, and two or three quarts of cold spring water poured over it; when it has stood for twenty-four hours, the water should be poured off, the yeast will then be found at the bottom of the vessel, quite thick. To preserve that which may be left over the baking, it should be put into a bottle, corked tightly, and kept in a cool place. In cold weather, it will continue good for a fortnight, but fresh yeast is always preferable. When it does not appear sufficiently strong, honey or brown sugar may be mixed with it, in the proportion of a tea-spoonful to half a pint.

BRAN YEAST.

Boil for ten minutes, in two quarts of water, one pint of bran, and a small handful of good hops; strain it through a sieve, and, when milk-warm, add three or four table-spoonfuls of beer yeast, and two of brown sugar or treacle; put it into a wooden stoup or jug; cover it, and place it before the fire to ferment. It may be bottled, tightly corked, and kept in a cool place.

POTATO YEAST.

Boil some good mealy potatoes; peel and weigh them; while hot, bruise them finely, and mix them quickly with boiling water, allowing one quart to each pound; rub it through a hair-sieve, then add honey or brown sugar, in the proportion of one ounce to each quart of water; boil it to the consistency of batter, and when nearly cold, add a large table-spoonful of good yeast to every quart of water; cover it with a cloth to rise, and the following day it will be ready for use; keep a bottle of it, which may be used instead of beer yeast for the next making, first pouring off the thin liquid that is on the top. It must be made with fresh beer yeast every two or three months. Double the quantity of this, as of beer yeast, is required to make bread light.

A BAKER’S YEAST.

Boil two ounces of hops in four quarts of water one hour, adding more water as it decreases, carefully stirring it all the time, and taking care that it do not boil over; strain the liquor, and mix well with it two pounds of malt; cover, and let it stand for eight hours, or until it be milk-warm; then stir in half a pint of good yeast; when mixed well together, let it work for ten hours, and then strain it through a hair-sieve.


Return to our Practice of Cookery Index page

 


This comment system requires you to be logged in through either a Disqus account or an account you already have with Google, Twitter, Facebook or Yahoo. In the event you don't have an account with any of these companies then you can create an account with Disqus. All comments are moderated so they won't display until the moderator has approved your comment.

comments powered by Disqus

Quantcast