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THE PRACTICE OF COOKERY
CHAPTER XIX - Miscellany


PERMANENT INK.

Rub down, in a small mortar, five scruples of lunar caustic, with one drachm of gumarabic, one scruple of sap green, and one ounce of rain water.

LIQUID POUNCE.

One ounce of sal-soda is to be mixed with two ounces of boiling water, and a little gumarabic; shake the bottle, wet the linen with the mixture, dry and iron it before using the ink, and again put the iron on it after it is marked.

ALMOND PASTE.

Pound and mix thoroughly the following ingredients: - One pound of raisins stoned; two pounds of bitter almonds blanched; sixpence worth of camphor; a wine-glass of brandy; one of honey; two beaten eggs, and a little fine sand sifted.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE ALMOND PASTE.

Finely pound, and well mix, with a sufficient quantity of orange-flower or rose water, half a pound of bitter, one pound of sweet almonds blanched, and one pound of honey; put it into small pots, and pour over it a little orange-flower or rose water; tie them over closely with paper.

LAVENDER WATER.

Put into a large bottle, eight ounces of the best rectified spirit of wine, three drachms of oil of lavender, one drachm of essence of ambergris, and threepence worth of musk; cork it tightly, and shake it well every day for a fortnight or three weeks.

TO MAKE INK.

To four ounces of bruised galls, allow two of copperas, and two of gumarabic; put the galls into a large bottle, with three pints of rain water, and in three or four days dissolve the gum in hot water, and add it with the copperas; shake the bottle frequently for some days. A few cloves may be put into the bottle to prevent the ink from moulding.

TO TAKE OUT IRON MOULDS.

Pound two ounces of cream of tartar, and mix thoroughly with it one ounce of salt of sorrel; keep it in a bottle closely corked. Fill a metal water-plate with boiling water; wet the iron mould; place it upon the plate, and rub it with a little of the powder till it disappears; then rinse it in water. Or mix in a tea-cup one tea-spoonful of oil of vitriol, and two of common salt; place it in warm ashes; hold the strained part over it, and the stain will soon disappear; then wash the part in cold water.

NEATS’ FOOT OIL.

Boil the feet for several hours, as for making stock for jelly; skim off the oily matter from time to time as it rises, and when it ceases to come up, pour off the water; next day take off the cake of fat and oil which will be found on the top; boil it and the oil before obtained, together with a little cold water; let it cool, pour off the water, and bottle the oil for use. This oil, being perfectly pure, and free from smell, may be used with the French lights in a sick room.

TO DISCHARGE ALL STAINS WHICH ARE NOT METALLIC.

Mix two tea-spoonfuls of water with one of spirit of salt; let the stain lie in it for one or two minutes; then rinse the article in cold water. This will be found particularly useful in removing stains from white doilys. Or, to remove port wine stains, cover them thickly, while wet, with salt, and instantly immerse the article in boiling water; repeat the process if the stains do not disappear at first.

TO WASH PAINT.

Brush off the dust with a small long-haired brush; mix finely-powdered whitening and bullock’s gall, till of the consistence of a batter; with a flannel rub it on the walls up and down, and then wash it off with a clean flannel and plenty of cold water, and when nearly dry, rub it hard with a clean linen cloth; the unpleasant smell from the gall will go off almost immediately. If the paint is not very much soiled, it may be washed merely with the whitening mixed with cold water, first wetting below the hand.

TO WASH IMITATION WAINSCOT.

Wash first with cold water and a clean flannel, and then with sour porter; after which it is not to be wiped. Or wash with whitening mixed with cold water; wash off with clean water; dry it well, and then rub hard with linseed oil.

TO CLEAN PAPERED ROOMS.

Blow off the dust with a pair of bellows; cut the upper crust off a stale loaf of bread; hold the crust in the hand, and rub gently downwards, about half a yard at each stroke. The next time of going round, commence a little above where the last stroke ended, and take care not to cross the paper, or go up again. The process may be repeated; and, if carefully done, the paper will look nearly as well as new.

TO CLEAN POLISHED GRATES AND IRONS.

Make into a paste, with cold water, four pounds of putty powder, and one of finely-powdered whitening; dip a duster into the mixture; rub off carefully all the spots, and with a well-aired clean duster, rub the grate or irons one way till bright and clear. Plain dry whitening will keep it highly polished, if well attended to every day. The putty mixture should be used only to remove spots. To remove rust from the poker, tongs, and shovel, boil one pound of middling-sized emery powder with half a pound of soft soap, till it is thick as paste; when cold, rub the irons with it; rub it off with a dry cloth, and polish with finely-powdered and sifted brick dust, or whitening 

To keep steel grates, fenders, and fire-irons from rusting, rub them over with fresh mutton suet, melted, and then dust them with unslaked lime, tied up in a bit of coarse muslin.

TO CLEAN BRASS AND COPPER.

Rub it over slightly with a bit of flannel dipped in sweet oil; next, rub it hard with another bit dipped in finely-powdered rotten-stone; then make it clean with a soft linen cloth, and finish by polishing it with a plate-leather.

ANOTHER WAY TO CLEAN BRASS AND COPPER.

 Put one pennyworth of powdered rotten-stone into a dry clean quart bottle; nearly fill it up with cold soft water; shake it well, and add one pennyworth of vitriol. Rub it on with a rag, and dry it with a clean soft cloth, and then polish it with a plate-leather. This mixture will keep for a long time, and becomes better the longer it is kept. But the first method gives the most lasting polish, as well as the finest colour.

ANOTHER WAY TO CLEAN BRASS, COPPER, AND TINS.

Mix together finely-pounded rotten-stone, and soft soap, till it is a thick paste. Rub with a bit of rag dipped into the mixture; rub it off with leather, and polish with soft plate leather. When the paste becomes hard, rub it with a bit of wet rag. Keep it bright with dry powdered rotten-stone.

FOR SCOURING FLOORS.

Dry some fuller’s earth, and with boiling water make it into a thick paste; mix it with one-third of its quantity of very fine sand, sifted; sprinkle this mixture over the floor, and with a scrubbing-brush and cold water, scrub the boards up and down, but not across, and finish by scrubbing with plenty of cold water. Very fine sand and cold water may be used in general; and to extract grease, mix some pearl ashes in hot water, and use it with fine sand. Equal proportions of spirits of salt, and of vinegar, mixed, will extract all stains out of floors.  

TO WASH STONE STAIRS AND HALLS.

Wash them first with hot water and a clean flannel, and then wash them over with pipe-clay mixed in water. When dry, rub them with a coarse flannel.

TO TAKE OIL AND GREASE OUT OF FLOORS AND STONE HALLS.

Make a strong infusion of potash with boiling water; add to it as much quick-lime as will make it of the consistence of thick cream; let it stand a night, then pour off the clear part, which is to be bottled for use. When wanted, warm a little of it; pour it upon the spots, and after it has been on them for a few minutes, scour it off with warm water and soap, as it is apt to discolour the boards when left too long on them. When put upon stone, it is best to let it remain all night; and if the stain be a very bad one, a little powdered hot lime may be put upon it before the infusion is poured on.

TO CLEAN FLOOR CLOTHS.

Sweep them clean, and wash off any dirty spots with a spunge and cold water, then rub them with a coarse flannel, and polish with a clean one.

TO PREVENT CREAKING HINGES.

Rub them with soft soap, or a feather dipped in sweet oil.

TO DESTROY BUGS.

Mix one ounces of corrosive sublimate with a pint of spirits of wine; shake it well, and, with a feather, rub it over the joints and posts of the bedsteads. Repeat the application if the first is not successful. Or well wash with a strong infusion of tobacco leaves, steeped in boiling water.

TO SWEEP CARPETS.

Sprinkle tea-leaves over them, and sweep them with a hair broom; a whisk should very seldom be used; and fine carpets should be done with a clothes brush. Dry snow is preferable to tea-leaves, and should be used in the same way.

TO WASH AND CLEAN A CARPET.

Shake and beat it well; lay it upon the floor, and tack it firmly; then with a clean flannel wash it over with one quart of bullock’s gall, mixed with three quarts of soft cold water, and rub it off with a clean flannel or house cloth. Any particularly dirty spot should be rubbed with pure gall.

TO TAKE STAINS OUT OF MARBLE CHIMNEY. PIECES AND HEARTHS.

Mix, with one quart of strong soap-lees, one pound of pearl ashes, and as much fine whitening as will make it into a paste; lay this all over the marble, and let it remain for some weeks; then wash it off with a flannel, and cold water and soap. Polish it with a dry flannel.

TO CLEAN FEATHERS.

Allow, to every gallon of water, half a pound of quick lime; stir the mixture well, and let it stand a night; then pour off for use the lime water that is perfectly clear; put the feathers to be cleaned into a deep tub, and pour as much lime water on them as will cover them; stir them well with a stick, and let them stand two or three days, stirring them frequently; then put them into a bag, and wash them thoroughly in cold water; then turn them out on sieves, and wring the water from them by squeezing them in small portions with the hands; after which, they may be separated, the hard quills picked out, and the down stripped from the large feathers. When they are thus carefully cleaned, lay them on a floor where air can be freely admitted; turn and shake them frequently, and when dry, put them into bag, and beat them on a knocking-stone with a knocker.

TO WASH SILK STOCKINGS, WHITE AND BLACK.

Cut in thin bits some white soap, and boil it in soft water; pour a little of it amongst cold soft water, and wash the stockings, first upon the inner side; repeat the washing with fresh suds and water, till they are washed quite clean; turn the outside the last time of washing, and if the feet be very dirty, rub a little of the boiled soap upon them, but not upon the legs. If to be coloured, mix the dye with a little clean suds, and dip in the white stockings; draw them out smooth, and lay them upon a sheet on a bed, with the window open, and when almost dry, lay them upon a piece of flannel, and with another bit rolled up, rub them hard and quick one way, till they look glossy and are dry. They may be mangled, turned upon the inner side, and must always be folded straight upon the instep.

TO WASH LACE.

Place the lace in folds, and baste it on each side; lay it in cold water for a night, and wash it in cold water with the best white soap; gently rub and squeeze it; wash it in three or four waters with the soap, and after that rinse it well in clean water; then put it into thin starch or rice water; take out the basting thread, and spread it on a blanket upon a bed to dry; when it is nearly so, pick it out; lay it in folds, and when quite dry, lay it in an old cambric handkerchief, and then in the folds of a towel; put it upon the rug, or upon a blanket laid upon a stone, and with a heavy wooden pestle, or rolling-pin, beat it hard till the lace looks quite smooth. A scarf or veil, after being starched, should be pinned out tight upon a cloth on the floor, and when dry, beaten in the same manner.

TO WASH HEAD AND CLOTHES BRUSHES.

In a pint of hot water, put a dessert-spoonful of pearl ashes, and shake the brush about in it till it be perfectly clean; then pour some clean hot water over it; shake, and dry it before the fire.

TO WASH FLANNELS AND WORSTED THINGS, TO PREVENT THEIR SHRINKING, AND TO KEEP THEM OF A GOOD COLOUR.

Take half the weight of soda that there is of soap; boil them with water, allowing a gallon to every pound of soap, and use it when perfectly cold. Wet the flannels in cold water, then wash them in fresh cold water, with some of the boiled mixture amongst it; wash them in this, changing the water till they become perfectly clean; then rinse them well in cold water, and dry them in the shade. Worsted stockings, washed in this manner, will be made quite clean; but particular care must be taken to wet them in clean cold water, previous to washing them in the cold suds. Blankets should be washed in this way also, and when nearly dry, frequently shaken to raise the pile, and to make them soft.

All dirty clothes should be laid in cold water the night before being washed.

TO WASH COTTON STOCKINGS.

Lay them in cold water at night; next day boil them in a copper with some soda and soap; stir them well about, and they will become quite clean without any rubbing; rinse them well in cold water, and bleach them; when nearly dry, draw them smooth, folding them straight over the instep. Place them under a heavy weight, or iron them.

TO WASH COLOURED DRESSES.

Turn the inner side out, and wash them in cold water, in which a little boiled soap is well mixed; rinse them well in clean cold water, and the last time with a little salt in the water, and dry them in the shade. They should be washed and dried with as much expedition as possible.

TO CLEAN GOLD CHAINS, EAR-RINGS, &C.

Make a lather of soap and water; boil the chain in it for a few minutes, and immediately on taking it out, lay it in magnesia powder which has been heated by the fire; when dry, rub it with flannel; if embossed, use a brush. Or wash a gold chain in soap and water; put it, whilst wet, into a bag filled with boxwood sawdust; shake it well, and take it out in a little, when it will be found perfectly clean. The bag must be about eight inches long and three broad; and if boxwood sawdust cannot be obtained, fresh clean bran may be substituted.

TO CLEAN GLASSES.

Glasses should be washed in a wooden vessel, in which put a sufficiency of cold water to cover them, and rinse them in fresh cold water; wipe off the wet with one cloth, and finish them with another.

TO CLEAN DECANTERS.

Roll up, in small pieces, some coarse brown paper or blotting-paper; wet and soap them, and put them into the decanter, with a little pearl ashes; fill in some lukewarm water, shake it well for a few minutes, or, if very dirty, let them stand some hours; then rinse the decanters with clean cold water. If this does not remove the crust of wine which may be at the bottom, use stable litter, with which nearly half fill the decanter, adding some cold water, and let it remain for several hours; shake it well, and rinse with clean cold water till perfectly clean. The stable litter will also be found an effectual cleanser for bottles of any kind, however dirty; but it will be the less required, and much trouble will be spared, if all the bottles used throughout the day be rinsed at night with cold water before being put away.

To clean cut crystal, rub it well with a damp spunge, dipped in whitening; then take a clean brush and brush it off; afterwards wash the vessel in cold water.

To loosen glass stoppers. – When glass stoppers cannot easily be taken out, drop on them a little olive oil; place the decanter or bottle before the fire, and in a few minutes they will become loose. Or, dip a cloth into hot water, wrap it round the neck of the decanter or bottle, taking care not to round the neck of the decanter or bottle, taking care not to touch the stopper, which in a few seconds may be taken out.

TO CLEAN LOOKING-GLASS.

Take a bit of soft spunge, well washed, and cleaned from every thing gritty; just dip it into water, and squeeze it out again, and then dip it into spirits of wine, or any other spirits; rub it over the glass, then dust it over with some powder-blue, or whitening, sifted through muslin; rub it lightly and quickly off again, with a soft cloth; then take a clean cloth, and rub it well again, and finish by rubbing it with a silk handkerchief. If the frames be varnished, great care must be taken not to touch them with the spunge, or with any thing damp. To clean the frames, take a little cotton wool, and rub them with it.

TO CLEAN HATS.

When a hat gets wet, wipe it as dry as may be with a cloth or silk handkerchief, then brush it with a soft brush; when it gets nearly dry, use a harder brush; and if the fur still sticks, damp it with a spunge dipped in beer or vinegar; then brush it with a hard brush till it is dry.

TO REMOVE SPOTS OF GREASE OUT OF CLOTH.

Moisten them with a few drops of concentrated solution of subcarbonate of potash; rub the spots between the fingers, and then wash the spot with a little warm water.

To remove the oil-paint, or grease, rub the part with a bit of flannel dipped in spirits of wine or turpentine.

FURNITURE OIL.

Mix with one pint of cold-drawn linseed oil, one ounce of spirits of white lavender, half an ounce of powdered gumarabic, dissolved in a little hot oil. This being thoroughly mixed, rub it over the tables with a little wool, and rub it with clean linen cloths. A brush must never be used. If the furniture is desired of a very dark colour, add to this mixture three ounces of alkanet root, and two ounces of rose pink.

TO CLEAN CHAIRS.

Scrape down one or two ounces of bees-wax; put it into a jar, and pour as much spirit of turpentine over it as will cover it; let it stand till dissolved. Put a little upon a flannel or bit of green baize, rub it upon the chairs, and polish them with a brush. A very small portion of finely-powdered white rosin may be mixed with the turpentine and wax.

TO CLEAN PLATE.

Cut a yard of coarse calico into four, and boil it in a quart of water, together with two ounces of calcined, powdered, and sifted hartshorn, till all the liquid be absorbed. The plate being washed clean, rub it with a piece of the cloth.

All plate powder which is mixed with mercury is pernicious. Fine colcothar of vitriol, such as painters use, is an excellent plate powder; that, or whitening, may be used, dry, or wet with water, spirits, or oil. The last gives the brightest polish, but is the most troublesome; it should be put upon the plate with a piece of flannel, the powder then shaken over it, and rubbed off with a leather, or with the hand, if the article is plain; for the rough parts, it will be necessary to have brushes of various sizes, hard and soft; a small tooth-brush will be found useful amongst them. The spunge and leather used for washing plate before it is put upon the table.

Plated articles should be cleaned with soft brushes, and not too often, and never with any thing but plate powder, wet with spirits or water, as above directed.

To remove wax or grease from plate or candlesticks, pour boiling water on them, and wipe them dry directly with an old cloth.

JAPANNED CANDLESTICKS AND TEA-TRAYS.

To remove grease from candlesticks, just let the water be warm enough to melt it; then wipe them with a cloth, and if they look smeared, sprinkle a little flour upon them, and wipe it clean off. Wax candles should not be burned in them, as the wax cannot be taken off without injuring the varnish.

TO CLEAN AND TAKE OFF SPOTS UPON BRONZE TEA-URNS.

Fill the tea-urn with boiling water; rub the outside all over with a piece of flannel dipped into strong suds, made with yellow soap. Rub it with soft linen cloths.

WAX CANDLES.

Should they get dirty or yellow, wet them with a piece of flannel dipped in spirits of wine.

SHOE-BLACKING.

To four ounces of ivory-black, allow three ounces of loaf sugar, one table-spoonful of salad oil, one ounce of oil of vitriol, and one pint of vinegar; dissolve the sugar in a little vinegar, put it on the fire together with the oil, and stir it well; when moderately heated, add the pint of vinegar, and ivory-black; and, when cold, stir in the vitriol; put it into a quart bottle, shake it well, and fill it up with vinegar. 

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE SHOE-BLACKING.

Mix, in one quart of sour porter, the following ingredients: - Three ounces of ivory-black, the same quantity of treacle, two table-spoonfuls of sweet oil, and, lastly, one ounce of vitriol; bottle, and shake it well.

BLACKING FOR CARRIAGE HARNESS AND LEATHER.

Boil, in one quart of vinegar, or sour ale, for twenty minutes, the following ingredients: - Four ounces of fine glue, three ounces of soft soap, half an ounce of isinglass, two ounces of logwood chips, half an ounce of black sealing wax, and three drachms of indigo; strain it while hot.

TO CLEAN BOOT-TOPS WHITE.

Mix, in a quart bottle of soft water, one ounce of oxalie acid, two ounces of finely-pounded pumice-stone, and two tea-spoonfuls of salt of lemon. Cork it tightly

TO CLEAN BOOT-TOPS BROWN.

Mix, in the same quantity of water, one ounce of oxalie acid, half an ounce of muriatic acid, a small phial of spirit of lavender, and two tea-spoonfuls of salt of lemon. Each bottle should be carefully labeled, and marked – “Poison.”

DIRECTIONS FOR USING THE LIQUID.

For the white tops: to be scrubbed well on with a clean hard brush, then sponged well with cold water, all one way, and allowed to dry gradually in the sun, or by the fire.

Brown tops are not to be scrubbed with a brush, but sponged all over with the mixture, till all stains be removed; then sponged well with cold water, and rubbed with flannel till they be highly polished.

TO RENDER BOOTS AND SHOES WATER-PROOF.

Mix carefully over a slow fire, a pint of drying-oil, two ounces of turpentine, two ounces of yellow wax, and half an ounce of Burgundy pitch. Lay the mixture, whilst hot, on the boots and shoes with a spunge, soft brush, or bit of flannel, and when dry, lay it on again; repeat the operation until the leather becomes quite saturated. Let them be put away, and not worn, till they become perfectly elastic, when they will be found not only impervious to wet, but soft, and pliable, and more durable.

TO TAKE INK OUT OF MAHOGANY.

Mix, in a tea-spoonful of cold water, a few drops of oil of vitriol; touch the spot with a feather dipped in it; and, when it disappears, wash the part that has been stained with cold water.

TO CLEAN STONE KITCHENS.

They should not be often washed, but dry-rubbed with a blue or grey stone, then wiped with a coarse flannel, and swept; thus all greasy spots will be removed. A common brick may be used instead of the stone.

TO PREVENT THE SMOKING OF A LAMP.

Soak the wick in strong vinegar, and dry it well before it is used.

POT POURRI.

Gather, when perfectly dry, a peck of roses; pick off the leaves, and strew over them three quarters of a pound of common salt; let them remain two or three days, and if any fresh flowers are added, some more salt should be sprinkled over the. Mix with the roses half a pound of finely-pounded bay-salt, the same quantity of allspice, of cloves, and of brown sugar, a quarter of a pound of gum-benjamin, and two ounces of orris-root; add a glass of brandy, and any sort of fragrant flower, such as orange and lemon flowers, rosemary, and a great quantity of lavender flowers – also white lilies; a green orange stuck with cloves may be added. All the flowers must be gathered perfectly dry.

TO MAKE COFFEE WHEN MUCH IS REQUIRED.

In the morning, pour upon a quarter of a pound of fresh-ground coffee about two quarts of boiling water; stir it for three or four minutes; cover it closely, and let it remain till the evening; pour it off quite clear, and boil it up for use.

ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE COFFEE.

Boil one ounce of good coffee for fifteen minutes in a pint and a half of water. The next day pour off the clear liquor and add to it one pint of new milk; make it quite hot, but do not allow it to boil. Sweeten it with pounded sugar candy, or brown sugar.

COCA.

Put into a sauce-pan one ounce of patent cocoa, and one quart of water; cover it, and when it boils, set it by the side of the fire to simmer for two hours. It is sometimes made in a larger quantity, poured from the sediment, and boiled up as it is required.

CHOCOLATE.

Scrape down one square of chocolate, and mix it with one pint of boiling milk, or milk and water; then mill or stir it well, and serve it with the froth.

OATMEAL GRUEL.

Mix in a bason two table-spoonfuls of oatmeal with a little cold water; then pour on it about a quart of boiling water, stir it well, and let it settle for a few minutes; pour off the water into a sauce-pan, and boil it for ten or fifteen minutes, stirring it, and taking off the scum as it rises.

BARLEY WATER.

Wash two ounces of pearl-barley in water; boil it for a few minutes in a little fresh water; pour that off, and add a quart more; when it boils, let it simmer for nearly an hour, and then strain it. It may be sweetened with sugar, and seasoned with a little of the peel and juice of a lemon.

APPLE WATER.

Cut three or four large apples into slices; put them into a jug, and pour a quart of boiling water over them; cover the jug. When quite cold, strain and sweeten it, and add a little lemon juice.

COOLING DRINK.

A palatable and cooling drink may be made by pouring hot water over slices of lemon; when cold, to be strained and sweetened.

BEEF TEA.

Cut a piece of lean beef into small thin bits; boil it with a quart of water in a closely-covered sauce-pan; let it simmer for half an hour, then strain, and serve it with salt.

WHITE WINE WHEY.

Boil a pint of milk, and when it rises in the pan, pour in one glass of sherry and one of currant wine; let it again boil up, take it off the fire, and when it has stood a few minutes, remove the curd, pour off the clear whey, and sweeten it.

IRISH, OR TWO MILK WHEY.

One-third of fresh buttermilk is allowed to two-thirds of sweet milk; put the milk into a sauce-pan, make it boiling hot, and then pour in the buttermilk, and gently stir it round the edges of the pan; let it come to a boil, take it off the fire, let it settle, and strain off the whey.

Sour milk may be substituted for buttermilk. An excellent drink in fever.

TOAST AND WATER.

Pare the crust off a thin slice of stale bread; toast it brown upon both sides, doing it equally and slowly, that it may harden without being burnt; put it into a jug, and pour upon it boiling water; cover the jug with a saucer, and set it in a cool place.

ARROW-ROOT WATER.

Boil the peel of half a lemon in a quart of water; pour it over a table-spoonful of arrow-root which has been mixed with a little cold water, and that poured off; stir it well; sweeten it with loaf sugar, and again stir it over the fire till it boil; before drinking it, squeeze in a little lemon juice. This is a grateful drink to a sick person.

BREAD JELLY FOR AN INVALID.

Cut the crumb of a penny roll into thin slices, and toast them equally of a pale brown; boil them gently in a quart of water till it will jelly, which may be known by putting a little in a spoon to cool; strain it upon a bit of lemon-peel, and sweeten it with sugar. A little wine may be added.

LUNCHEON FOR AN INVALID.

Put bread crumbs and red currant, or any other jelly, alternately into a tumbler, and when nearly half full, fill it up with milk.

SAGO.

Cleanse it by fist soaking it an hour in cold water, and then washing it in fresh water. To a tea-cupful, add a quart of water and a bit of lemon-peel; simmer it till the berries are clear, season with wine and spice, and boil it all up together. The sago may be boiled with milk instead of water, till reduced to one-half, and served without seasoning.

MULLED WINE.

Put into a pint of port wine two or three cloves and a bit of cinnamon; boil it for a few minutes; take out the spice, sweeten it with loaf sugar, and grate in a little nutmeg. Serve with a slice of toasted bread, the crust pared off, and cut into oblong pieces. The port wine is sometimes boiled with a third of its quantity of water.

GLOUCESTER JELLY.

Boil, in two quarts of water, till reduced to one quart, the following ingredients: - Hartshorn shavings, isinglass, ivory shavings, barley, and rice, one ounce of each.

When this jelly, which is light, and very nourishing, is to be taken, a few table-spoonfuls of it must be dissolved in a little milk, together with a bit of cinnamon, lemon-peel, and sugar. It will be very good without the seasoning.

TO MAKE ARROW-ROOT.

Mix with two or three table-spoonfuls of arrow-root half a pint of cold water; let it stand for nearly a quarter of an hour, pour off the water, and stir in some pounded sugar; boil a pint of milk, and pour it gradually upon the arrow-root, stirring it one way all the time. Or it may be made with water in which lemon-peel has been boiled, and then a glass of port or white wine and a little nutmeg stirred into it.

CREAM OF TARTAR.

When to be taken, either medicinally or as a cooling drink, may be mixed, in the proportion of a heaped tea-spoonful to a pint of water, which has, when hot, been poured upon the thin peel of half a lemon, and allowed to stand till quite cold. Sweeten with honey or sugar.

SUET MILK.

Cut into very small shavings one ounce of fresh mutton suet; dissolve it slowly over the fire in one pint of milk, together with a bit of lemon-peel and cinnamon; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar.

SALINE DRAUGHT.

Salt of wormwood, twenty grains, lemon juice, a table-spoonful, water, two table-spoonfuls, magnesia, twenty grains; mix it in a tumbler, together with a little pounded sugar, and take two or three of these in the day.

FOR A COUGH.

Two ounces of squalled vinegar, two ounces of clarified honey, two drachms of tincture of tolu, sixty drops of laudanum; two tea-spoonfuls to be taken morning and evening by a grown person, one by a child.

SAGE GARGLE.

Boil quickly in a pint of water, a large handful of sage leaves; cover the pan closely, and when reduced to one-half, strain it; when cold, mix it with the same quantity of port wine and of vinegar; sweeten it with honey, or with brown sugar. The decoction of sage may be used alone as a gargle or with vinegar and honey, without the port wine. Or gargle with vinegar and water.

BITTERS.

Put into a quart of sherry one ounce of best pounded aloes, the same of rhubarb and of liquorice root, also one tea-spoonful of powdered ginger; keep it in the sun, or by the fire, for eight or ten days, shaking it frequently; let it settle for twenty-four hours; strain it through flannel. Two or three tea-spoonfuls relieve headaches and weakness of the stomach.

LIP SALVE.

One ounce and a half of white wax, two ounces of fresh suet, one ounce of oil of sweet almonds, half an ounce of spermaceti, two drachms of alkanet root, two drachms of balsam of Peru, one ounce of finely-pounded double-refined sugar, and six raisins sliced; simmer all these ingredients together for ten minutes, and strain it through muslin. Or chopped lips may be washed frequently with an equal quantity of loaf sugar and salt dissolved in hot water.

COLD CREAM.

Cut one cake of white wax into thin shavings, and dissolve it in one pint of oil of sweet almonds, together with a table-spoonful of powdered spermaceti, and one of fresh lard; when melted, throw it into a large basin of cold water, and, with a silver spoon, beat it about briskly for half an hour; pour off the water, add as much fresh water, and beat it again for the same length of time; then pour off the water, and add a quart of rose water, and beat it briskly for half an hour. Put it into small pots, filling them not quite full, and pour a little fresh rose water on the top; cover them closely with bladder and paper.

RED LAVENDER DROPS.

Fill a quart bottle with the blossoms of lavender, and pour on it as much brandy as it will contain; let it stand ten days, then strain it, and add, of nutmeg bruised, cloves, mace, and cochineal, a quarter of an ounce each, and bottle it for use. In nervous cases, a little may be taken dropped on a bit of sugar; and in the beginning of a bowel complaint, a tea-spoonful, taken in half a glass of peppermint water, will often prove efficacious.

FOR THE EAR ACHE.

Dip a little cotton wool in a mixture of oil of sweet almonds and laudanum, and put it into the ear; or apply a small poultice, in which is put a raw chopped clove of garlic.

BURNS.

Apply to, or wrap round, the burnt part some folds of cotton wool, bought in sheets, or as it comes from the West Indies; however severe the pain may be, it will abate in a few hours. Should blisters rise, they may next day be carefully pricked with a needle, so as to break the skin as little as possible; and the cotton kept on till the cure if effected.  

TO STOP VIOLENT BLEEDING FROM A CUT.

Make a paste, by mixing fine flour with vinegar, and lay it on the cut.

HARVEST BUGS.

Mix equal parts of oil of cloves, laudanum, and spirits of hartshorn, and apply it to the part effected.

TOOTH POWDER.

Mix hartshorn, shavings, calcined and pulverized, three-fifths; myrrh, pulverized two-fifths.

PASTE.

Rub two table-spoonfuls of flour quite smooth in one pint of water; put it on the fire, and stir it constantly till it become clear, which it may be after boiling for about ten minutes. A stronger and more delicate paste may be made of starch, by boiling it for a few minutes after it has been prepared as for starching muslin.

LA TIRE, OR LONDON CANDY.

Rub some fresh butter over the bottom and sides of a brass-pan, and boil in it two quarts of good treacle, with a tea-spoonful of cinnamon, and a dessert-spoonful of ginger, the grated peel and juice of one or two lemons – a glass of rum may be added; stir it all the time it is boiling; in ten minutes or so, drop a little upon a buttered plate, and if it harden, pour it from the pan over the bottom of buttered plates; as soon as it colds sufficiently to be handled safely, pull it out with a machine made for the purpose, or rub the hands with butter, and draw it out at arm’s-length, then fold it, touching it as lightly as possible with the fingers; and so continue to work it till it hardens, and becomes of a light colour; it is then pulled out as quickly as possible into small sticks, which must be cut with a buttered knife on a table or board dusted with flour; narrow strips of white-brown paper should be prepared to twist round the sticks as they are cut. The plates should also be buttered before the boiling commences, and every thing had in readiness; as no time is to be lost after the treacle is boiled.

CAPTAIN HALL’S SANDWICHES FOR TRAVELERS.

Spread butter, very thinly, upon the upper part of a stale loaf of bread cut very smooth, and then cut off the slice; now cut off another thin slice, but spread it with butter on the under side, without which precaution the two slices of bread will not fit one another. Next take some cold beef, or ham, and cut it into very minute particles. Sprinkle these thickly over the butter, and, having added a little mustard, put the slices face to face, and press them together. Lastly, cut the whole into four equal portions, each of which is to be wrapped in a separate piece of paper.


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