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War between the States
History of Battery I


1st Ohio light Artillery


[IMAGE]
Monument at Gettysburg on Howard Ave.

FORT SUMTER, APRIL 13TH 1861

WILSON'S CREEK, AUGUST 10TH 1861

THESE CONFEDERATE VICTORYS WERE ON THE MINDS OF THE CITIZENS OF CINNCINNATI, FOR ONLY ACROSS THE OHIO RIVER WAS KENTUCKY. ALTHOUGH THE STATE GOVERNMENT SAID IT WAS NEUTRAL, MANY A NATIVE KENTUCKIAN WAS WEARING THE GRAY AND ON THE SOUTHEASTERN BORDER OF OHIO WAS VIRGINIA. THE CITIZENS APPEALED TO GOVERNOR DENNISON FOR MILITARY ASSISTANCE AND WERE TOLD THAT THE ARSENAL WOULD BE PROVIDED BUT MANPOWER WAS A LOCAL PROBLEM. CINCINNATI HAD BEEN AND STILL WAS A RAPIDLY GROWING CITY AND SHE WAS PUTTING HER SHARE AND MORE IN FOR THE WAR EFFORT. SO AS SHE GREW, MORE AND MORE IMIGRANTS HAD COME TO THE CITY, GERMAN-AMERICANS IN PARTICULAR. THEY WERE LOOKING FOR A NEW LIFE IN THE COUNTRY THAT WAS OPENING IN THE WEST. AS MANY CAME THROUGH CINCINNATI ON THEIR WAY DOWN RIVER, THEY DECIDED TO STAY. OHIO CAME TO HAVE THE SECOND LARGEST GERMAN-AMERICAN POPULATION AND THE SECOND LARGEST CONTRIBUTION OF GERMAN-AMERICAN TROOPS. LIKE MANY IMIGRANTS, GERMAN-AMERICANS BUILT TOWNS AND VILLAGES WITH A DISTINCTIVE GERMAN LOOK, USED THEIR NATIVE LANGUAGE, AND STARTED THEIR OWN NEWSPAPERS. MANY GERMANS HAD FLED GERMANY DURING THE 1840'S WHEN REVOLUTION WAS SWEEPING EUROPE. TWO FAILED REVOLUTIONS TO FORM A REPUBLIC IN GERMANY, WHICH I WILL TALK ABOUT LATER, BROUGHT GERMANS TO AMERICA. NOW WITH THIER NEW ADOPTED REPUBLIC ABOUT TO BREAK APART, A CALL TO ARMS WAS SENT THROUGH THE GERMAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY.

ON SEPTEMBER 3, 1861, THE CITY OF CINCINNATI CALLED FOR 150 SOUND AND ABLE MEN TO HELP FORM A CITY BATTERY, MANY GERMANS ANSWERED THE CALL. THEIR FIRST COMMANDER WAS CAPT. HYMAN. HE SERVED 10 YEARS IN THE U.S. LIGHT ARTILLERY AND FOUGHT WITH MAJOR RINGOLD IN MEXICO. HE STARTED DRILLING IMMEDIATELY WITH THE NEW NAPOLEONS. A 32 YEAR-OLD NAMED WILLIAM DAMMERT SOON JOINED THE BATTERY. BECAUSE OF HIS GREAT EFFORTS OF POURING OVER BOOKS ABOUT ARTILLERY AND GAINING MILITARY KNOWLEDGE, HE WAS APPOINTED A FIRST LIEUTENANT. MOST OF THE MEN THAT WERE RECRUITED TO WATCH AND RUN THE OTHER GUNS WERE VOLUNTEERS IN THEIR SPARE TIME. THEY WERE LIKE A VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT THAT ONLY REPORTED WHEN NEEDED. THE ORPHAN ASYLUM, LATER TO BECOME CINCINNATI'S MUSIC HALL, WAS FIXED UP TO HOUSE THE MEN THAT WERE JOINING THE BATTERY. BY NOVEMBER 1861, THE ROSTER CONSISTED OF 132 OFFICERS AND MEN. IN DECEMBER THE BATTERY WAS ORDERED TO REPORT TO CAMP DENNISON, TO BE SWORN INTO FEDERAL SERVICE AS BATTERY I, FIRST REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER LIGHT ARTILLERY.

ON THE 26TH OF JANUARY, 1862, CAPT HYMAN RECEIVED SPECIAL ORDER NO. 24 TO HAVE BATTERY I PROCEED TO CINCINNATI AND THEN BE TRANSPORTED UP RIVER TO PARKERSBURG THEN TO GRAFTON. HE WOULD REPORT TO ROSECRANS FOR FURTHER ORDERS. THE NEXT MORNING THE ENTIRE BATTERY: SIX CANNON AND LIMBERS: 12 CAISSONS, WITH 1300 ROUNDS OR AMMUNITION: TRAVELING FORGE, AND SUPPLY WAGONS LEFT CAMP DENNISON.

AT PARKERSBURG THEY BOARDED A TRAIN AND MOVED THROUGH CLARKSBURG AND GRAFTON TO NEW CREEK (KEYSER CREEK), ARRIVING FEBRUARY 3. JUST A WEEK IN CAMP THEY RECEIVED ORDERS TO MOVE WITH COLONEL DUNNING AND 5 OTHER UNITS TO MOOREFIELD. THERE THEY ENGAGED 900 VIRGINIA MILITIA AND THE REBELS WITHDREW. A FEW DAYS LATER THEY RETURNED TO CLARKSBURG WHERE THEY WERE PUT UNDER THE COMMAND OF MILROY'S CHEAT MOUNTAIN COMMAND. ROSECRANS WAS REPLACED BY GENERAL FREMONT AND HE INSTRUCTED MILROY TO MOVE HIS MEN TO STAUNTON, IN THE SHENADOAH VALLEY. THEY MOVED OUT ON THE ROAD, WHICH IS NOW US 250, BUT HAD TO HALT IN MONTEREY BECAUSE OF THE RAIN THAT MADE THE ROAD TURN TO MUD. ON APRIL 12TH, MILROY WAS ABOUT TO MOVE OUT HIS TROOPS WHEN HE WAS ATTACKED BY CONFEDERATE GENERAL EDWARD JOHNSTONS COMMAND. AFTER A SHARP ENGAGEMENT, THE REBELS WITHDREW. MILROY CONTINUED ON TO MCDOWELL, A TINY TOWN AT THE FOOT OF BULL PASTURE MOUNTAIN. STONEWALL JACKSON HAD BEEN RAISING TROUBLE IN THE LOWER VALLEY AND BANKS WAS SENT TO TRY AND CONTROL HIM. BUT JACKSON KEPT OUTGUESSING HIM AND HE SAW MILROY'S THREAT FROM THE WEST, SO HE JOINED JOHNSTON. THE BATTLE OF MCDOWELL CAME ON MAY 8TH. CAPT HYMAN AND THE FIRST WERE COMPLIMENTED IN MANY REPORTS FOR THEIR RAPID AND ACCURATE FIRE. BUT THE DAY BELONGED TO THE REBELS AND MILROY WAS FORCED TO WITHDRAW NORTH TOWARD FRANKLIN. THE UNION FORCES WERE PRESSED ALL ALONG THE WAY.

WHEN ARRIVING AT FRANKLIN, MILROY SET UP A DEFENSIVE LINE ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF TOWN. ONE OF BATTERY I'S MEN WAS INJURED WHEN HIS LIMBER CHEST WAS HIT AND EXPLODED. JACKSON NOW JOINED EWELL AND THEY PUSHED BANKS OUT OF THE WINCHESTER. MILROY, WHO WAS NOW JOINED BY FREMONT, ADVANCED SOUTH PUSHING THE REBELS TO CROSS KEYS.

THE LINES WERE DRAWN AND FREMONT ADVANCED FIRST. THE ADVANCE FAILED AND THEN TURNED INTO A ROUT. THE FEDERAL LEFT WOULD HAVE TURNED IF IT WASN'T FOR THE ARTILLERY SUPPORT DELIVERED BY BATTERY I AND A SMALL VIRGINIA BATTERY MADE UP OF MOUNTAIN HOWITZERS UNDER THE COMMAND OF A LT. DILGER. THE REBELS WERE REPULSED AND RETURNED TO THEIR LINES. THERE THEY STAYED THAT NIGHT, BOTH SIDES BURING THEIR DEAD. ONE OF THE DEAD WAS A PRIVATE ERNST BOEGER OF BATTERY I, LATER BURIED AT STAUNTON. CAPTAIN HYMAN RECEIVED AN INJURY THAT LATER WOULD RESULT IN HIS DEPARTURE FROM THE BATTERY. JACKSON, WHO WAS FIGHTING SHIELDS AT PORT REPUBLIC, AND AT A HEAVY COST, NEEDED RIENFORCED. SO EWELL LEFT FREMONT, WHO WAS ALWAYS OVERLY CAUTIOUS, WATCHING AS HIS DIVISION CROSSED A BRIDGE OVER THE RIVER AND BURNED IT BEHIND THEM. JACKSON WAS REINFORCED AND ESCAPED . AN INTERESTING NOTE ABOUT THE BATTLE OF CROSS KEYS WAS THAT IT WAS FOUGHT ON LAND OWNED BY GERMAN-AMERICANS, BETWEEN TWO OLD GERMAN CHURCHES.

FREMONT AND BATTERY I WERE SENT TO MIDDLETOWN. WHILE THERE MAJOR GENERAL JOHN POPE TOOK COMMAND OF THE NEWLY FOUNDED ARMY OF VIRGINIA. FREMONT WAS INCENSED THAT HE DID NOT RECEIVE THE APPOINTMENT AND RESIGNED. HE WAS REPLACED BY GENERAL FRANZ SIGEL AND HIS ARMY REDESIGNATED AS THE FIRST CORP OF POPE'S ARMY. BATTERY I WAS ATTACHED TO CARL SCHURZ'S THIRD DIVISION OF THE CORP. SIGEL REPORTED THAT THEIR WAS A GREAT STATE OF DEMORALIZATION IN THE ARMY, EVEN FOR BATTERY I. IT SEEMS THAT SINCE EARLY SPRING THERE WAS FRICTION BETWEEN HYMAN AND DAMMERT. DAMMERT WROTE A LETTER TO THE ACTING REGIMENTAL COMMANDER IN WHICH HE ACCUSED HYMAN OF INCOMPETENCE, NEGLECT OF DUTY, LYING, STEALING, AND OTHER SKULLDUGGERY. IT IS ASSUMED THAT NOTHING WAS EVER DONE ABOUT THE CHARGES SINCE HYMAN COMMANDED THE BATTERY ALL SPRING. THEN DUE TO HIS INJURIES HE WAS FORCED TO ASK FOR A LEAVE OF ABSENCE. IN JANUARY, 1864, HYMAN DIED AND WAS BURIED IN SOLDIERS CIRCLE, SPRING GROVE CEMETERY IN CINCINNATI.

CAPT HENRY HYMAN, DEVELOPED DOUBLE VISION AND CONJUNCTIVITIS FROM HIS WOUNDS AT CROSS KEYS. ON JULY 21ST, HE REQUESTED A LEAVE OF ABSENCE. WHEN HIS CONDITION WORSENED HE RESIGNED AND WAS TEMPORARILY SUCCEEDED IN SEPTEMBER BY A YOUNG LT. FROM ANOTHER BATTERY WHO SERVED UNTIL DILGER WAS APPOINTED COMMANDER OF THE 1ST.

DILGER HAD MUSTERED OUT OF THE 1ST VIRGINIA LIGHT ARTILLERY ON AUG 1ST. NOT A MAN OVERLY CONCERNED WITH LEGALISMS AND PAPER WORK, HE HAD BEEN SERVING UNOFFICIALLY AND WITHOUT PAY IN FELLOW BADENER FRANZ SIGEL'S 1ST CORP OF THE ARMY OF VIRGINIA. THIS BROUGHT HIM PROBLEMS WITH THE PAYMASTER AND HE WAS FORCED TO WRITE MANY REQUESTS FOR BACK PAY, ALMOST COMING TO THE POINT OF PLEADING.

AT THE SECOND BATTLE OF BULL RUN, HE REPORTED THAT ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, THE BATTERY WAS ORDERED, UNDER THE PROTECTION OF COLONEL KOLTE'S BRIGADE, TO THE SUPPORT OF GENERAL SCHENCK'S DIVISION ON THE LEFT FLANK OF THE FIRST CORPS. HE TOOK UP POSITION UPON THE OUTERMOST ELEVATION IN OUR FRONT, JUST OPPOSITE A LARGE BATTERY OF THE ENEMY CONSISTING OF 10 GUNS. AFTER TWO HOURS OF FIRING THE ENEMY'S GUNS FELL SILENT. HE THEN SUPPORTED RETREATING INFANTRY WITH TWO PIECES ON HIS RIGHT. BUT THEN THE ENEMY'S GUNS REAPPEARED AND THE DUEL CONTINUED. HE WAS RELIEVED BY ANOTHER BATTERY JUST WHEN RUNNING OUT OF AMMUNITION. HIS LOSSES WERE 22 HORSES AND 4 MEN SLIGHTLY WOUNDED. THE DAMAGE TO THE GUNS SO SLIGHT THEY WERE FIXED THAT NIGHT.

DURING THE RETREAT NEAR FAIRFAX COURTHOUSE, GENERAL SCHURZ INVITED A GERMAN OBSERVER TO SET DOWN AT A TABLE WITH HIM AND HIS STAFF. THE OBSERVER AND STAFF LISTENED TO SCHURZ " IN A PATHETIC MANNER BEGAN TO MAKE KNOWN HIS PLANS FOR THE NEXT DAY, WHAT MIGHT DEVELOP AS A RESULT, AND WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN TO THE UNION FORCES. AT SOME DISTANCE FROM SCHURZ SAT A FORMER BADISCHER OFFICER NAMED DILGER WHO COMMANDED A BATTERY UNDER SCHURZ. RIDING HIS WHITE HORSE, HE HAD REPEATEDLY DISTINGUISHED HIMSELF, HOLDING OUT AGAINST FRIGHTFUL FIRE...AS SOON AS GENERAL SCHURZ FINISHED HIS PRESENTATION, DILGER CALLED DRYLY FROM THE OTHER END OF THE TABLE, 'BUT GENERAL, YOU AREN'T STILL PROPOSING SUCH NONSENSE?' THE REMARK WAS RECEIVED WITH WIDESPREAD SUSTAINED LAUGHTER. SCHURZ GOOD NATUREDLY AGREED AND WITH THAT THE MATTER WAS DROPPED." THIS CANDIDNESS WAS A CHARACTERISTIC THAT DID NOT CONTRIBUTE TOWARD HIS GETTING A PROMOTION.

AND WHO WAS THIS OBSERVER? COUNT FERDINAND VON ZEPPELIN WHO WOULD DEVELOP THE ZEPPELIN AIRSHIP.

DILGER'S BATTERY WAS ACQUIRING A REPUTATION FOR SKILL AND SPEED WITH WHICH IT COULD MANEUVER AND DELIVER EFFECTIVE FIRE. DILGER WAS NOT ABOVE PERSONNALY RECONNOITERING TO FIND THE BEST LOCATION FOR HIS GUNS AND OCCASIONALLY SIGHTING THEM HIMSELF, DANCING UP AND DOWN AND SLAPPING HIS THIGHS WHEN A TARGET WAS HIT. HE AND HIS BATTERY WOULD COME TO BE ALLOWED GREAT FREEDOM AND INDEPENDENCE, OFTEN BEING HELD IN RESERVE TO BE USED WHERE MOST NEEDED. HE WAS GIVEN SEVERAL NICKNAMES THROUGH HIS CAREER. THAT 'DAMNED DUTCHMAN' USED IN ADMIRATION RATHER THEN COMDEMNATION; 'WHITE HORSE HARRY' A PLAY ON GENERAL LEE'S FATHERS NICKNAME, BECAUSE OF HIS BRILLIANT HORSEMANSHIP AND A WHITE MOUNT; AND THE MOST FAMOUS 'LEATHERBREECHES' FROM HIS LEATHER TROUSERS HE FOUND MORE RUGGED THEN THE REGULAR ISSUE WHEN RIDING THROUGH BRUSH.

BETWEEN THE END OF THE SECOND BATTLE OF BULL RUN AND THE END OF 1862, BATTERY I DID NOT SEE ACTION. THEY SPENT MOST OF THEIR TIME IN ENCAMPMENTS TO THE EAST OF WASHINGTON. DURING THIS TIME POPE WAS REPLACED WITH MCCELLAN, MAKING ANOTHER APPEARENCE AS COMMANDER OF THE UNION FORCES. THE GREAT BATTLE AT ANTIETAM TRANSPIRED AND MCCLELLAN MADE HIS FINAL EXIT FROM THE MILITARY.

WHEN BURNSIDE TOOK OVER, BATTERY I WAS STILL UNDER FRANZ SIGEL BUT NOW WAS PART OF THE 11TH CORP. BURNSIDES PLAN TO TAKE FREDERICKSBURG PUT BATTERY I AWAY FROM THE ACTION BY REMAINING NEAR MANASSAS JUNCTION TO GUARD THE RAILWAY AND SCREEN WASHINGTON.

WITH THE DISASTER AT FREDERICKSBURG OVER, ON JAN 26, FIGHTING JOE HOOKER TOOK COMMAND. IN WINTER QUARTERS, HOOKER REORGANIZED THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC. THE 11TH CORP WHICH SUFFERED RIDICULE BECAUSE OF THE ACCENTS AND CUSTOMS OF ITS GERMAN TROOPS WAS ALLOWED TO REMAIN INTACT. BUT 32 YEAR OLD GENERAL HOWARD REPLACED 39 YEAR OLD FRANZ SIGEL. THE GERMANS SANG A SONG REFLECTING COMARADERIE AND LOYALTY TO THEIR FORMER COMMANDER AND OTHER OFFICERS ' I FIGHTS MIT SIGEL..' WITH THIS TIME OF REORGANIZATION AND TRAINING, DILGER BECAME TO KNOW HIS FELLOW BADENERS BETTER. HIS CLOSER RELATIONSHIP WITH COLONEL HECKER HAD BROUGHT HIM IN CLOSER CONTACT WITH HECKER'S BROTHER-IN-LAW'S FAMILY, THE TIEDEMANNS. ESPECIALLY ONE IN PARTICULAR, EILSE TIEDEMANN.

ON MONDAY 27TH OF APRIL, HOOKER MOVED THE ARMY. THE 11TH AND 2 OTHER CORP MOVED TO KELLY'S FORD. FINDING IT UNFORDABLE THEY WAITED ON ENGINEERS TO BUILD A PONTOON BRIDGE ACROSS THE RAPPAHANOCK. DILGER AND THE 11TH MADE IT ACROSS ON THE EVENING OF THE 28TH. ON FRIDAY MORNING MAY 1ST THE CONFEDERATE ARMY WAS ADVANCING ON CHANCELLORSVILLE TO MEET HOOKER AFTER AN ALL NIGHT MARCH. WITH JACKSON TO THE SOUTH AND LEE ON THE MAIN ROAD.

ABOUT FIVE MILES EAST OF CHANCELLORSVILLE, LEE'S MIDDLE COLUMN RAN INTO OPPOSITION. SINCE THEY HAD ATTAINED THEIR OBJECTIVE THEY INTENDED TO HOLD IT. WHEN HOOKER WAS INFORMED OF THE SKIRMISH HE ORDERED, OVER THE OPOSITION OF HIS CORP COMMANDERS, 3 COLUMNS TO WITHDRAW BACK. BUT LATER WITHDREW THOSE ORDERS AND ORDERED IT HELD. BUT IT WAS TO LATE AND THE 3 COLUMNS REJOINED THE CORPS. THAT EVENING LEE AND JACKSON MET AND IT WAS DECIDED TO ATTACK THE NEXT DAY. MOONLIGHT RECONNAISANCE SHOWED HOOKER'S POSITION TO WELL DEFENDED AND LEE SPLIT HIS ARMY UP AND SENT JACKSON AND STUART WITH 25,000 MEN. LEE WAS LEFT WITH 20,000 MEN TO DIVERT HOOKERS ATTENTION.

AS JACKSON WAS MOVING AROUND, HIS MOVEMENTS WERE SPOTTED BY UNION PICKETS WHO REPORTED THEM TO HOOKER'S HEADQUARTERS. MANY SAW THIS AS A WITHDRAW BUT HOOKER ORDER HOWARD TO BE PREPARED FOR AN ATTACK FROM THE WEST, WHICH WAS IGNORED.

GENERAL SCHURZ, UNEASY ABOUT THE PICKET REPORTS, SELECTED DILGER FOR A PERSONNAL RECON. DILGER RODE OFF WITH AN ORDERLY AND CONFIRMED THE PICKETS OBSERVATIONS. AS HE WAS RETURNING HIS PATH WAS CUT OFF BY THE REBEL ARMY AND WAS CHASED BY A FORCE OF CAVALRY NARROWLY ESCAPING. AFTER WANDERING AROUND IN THE BYPATHS IN THE WOODS HE FINALLY FOUND A ROAD WHICH LEAD HIM TO THE REAR OF THE CHANCELLOR HOUSE. HE THOUGHT IT HIS DUTY TO MAKE KNOW THE RESULTS OF HIS RECON. DILGER CAME UPON A MOUNTED STAFF OFFICER, A MAJOR OF CAVALRY, PERHAPS MAJOR CHANCELLOR, WHO WAS THE SON OF POSTMASTER CHANCELLOR. EXCITED BY HIS RIDE AND IN AN ACCENTED ENGLISH HE TOLD THE OFFICER THAT HE BELIEVED A LARGE FORCE OF THE ENEMY WAS COLLECTING IN OUR REAR. THE MAJOR WHO DIDN'T HOLD FOREIGNERS IN HIGH ESTEEM, TOLD DILGER TO GO TO HIS OWN CORP AND TELL HIS YARN THERE. DILGER FEELING INSULTED WENT WITH ALL SPEED TO THE 11TH CORP HEADQUARTERS AND REPORTED. TO HIS DISGUST AND INDIGNATION HIS REMARKS WERE RECEIVED WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST CONFIDENCE. AND HE WAS TOLD THAT HE HAD NO BUSINESS SCOUTING ON THE FLANK AND WAS FURTHERMORE INFORMED THAT GENERAL LEE WAS IN FULL RETREAT. DILGER RETURNED TO HIS BATTERY TO PREPARE FOR THE STORM THAT WAS COMING.

WHEN HE ARRIVED HE FOUND THAT THE 3RD CORP HAD BEEN WHEELED INTO POSITION TO ATTACK THE CONFEDERATES HARRASSING THE FEDERAL LEFT. THIS LEFT A GAP IN THE FIVE MILE FEDERAL LINE. HE ALSO FOUND THAT THE MEN OF THE 11TH CORP HAD ABANDONED THEIR DEFENSES, STACKED ARMS, AND WERE BUSY COOKING THEIR EVENING MEAL. DILGER ORDERED HIS MEN TO PREPARE TO MOVE QUICKLY. NOT VERY LONG AFTER, DEER CAME RUNNING OUT OF THE TREE LINES AND RAN THROUGH THE 11TH CORPS CAMPS. THEN SOON AFTER THAT CAME THE SOUNDS OF BUGLES AND THE REB YELL. THE REBELS CAME OUT OF THE WILDERNESS FIRING AS THEY ADVANCED AND DRIVING BACK THE PICKETS. BY 6 O'CLOCK PANIC TOOK HOLD AND THE 1ST DIVISION BROKE AND RAN. TWO BATTERIES WERE OVER TAKEN. THE 60TH OHIO REGIMENT AND THE 1ST TRYED TO HOLD BUT BEFORE LONG PART OF THE 60TH'S LINES WERE OVERRUN. THE REBS WERE WITHIN 75 YARDS OF DILGERS GUNS WHEN HE ORDERED THEM LIMBERED UP AND MOVED. HE MOVED UP ON TO HIGHER GROUND AND POURED CANISTER INTO THE ONCOMING REBELS. HECKER IN AN ATTEMPT TO STOP JACKSON'S ADVANCE GRABBED THE COLORS OF THE 82ND ILLINOIS TO LEAD A BAYONET CHARGE BUT WAS FELLED BY A SHOT IN THE THIGH. DILGER'S HORSE WAS SHOT AND DILGER BECAME PINNED UNDER HIM. SOME REBELS CAME CLOSE ENOUGH TO ORDER HIS SURRENDER BUT HE BROKE FREE AND LIMPED OFF. A BOY NAMED ACKLEY, WHO BECAME FRIENDS WITH DILGER, SAW HIS BATTERY PASS WITHOUT HIM. SO HE RODE BACK AND SAVED DILGER FROM CAPTURE. DILGER DESCRIBED IT AS ONE OF THE MOST BRAVEST ACTS HE EVER SAW.

2 WHEEL HORSES AND A LEAD HORSE OF ONE OF DILGERS GUNS HAD BEEN KILLED. THIS GUN HAD TO BE ABANDONED AFTER TRYING TO DRAG THE DEAD HORSES ALONG IN THEIR HARNESSES. HE ORDERED 4 OF HIS GUNS TO THE REAR TO SAVE THEM FROM CAPTURE AND USED THE ONE REMAINING TO RICOCHET FIRE DOWN THE TURNPIKE AT ADVANCING REBELS. WHEN ALMOST TO THE POINT OF BEING CAPTURED HE WITHDREW TO WHERE HIS OTHER GUNS WERE AND THEY TOOK UP POSITION ON FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS WHERE OTHER FEDERAL BATTERIES CONTINUED TO SHELL THE CONFEDERATES. WITH THE UNION FORCES NOW IN A DEFENSIVE LINE BY THE CHANCELLOR HOUSE, THE 1ST AND THE OTHER FEDERAL BATTERIES KEPT FIRING UNTIL 3 AM. AT 845 THE FIRING RESUMED. THE UNION LINE HELD UNTIL 945 AND THEN FELL BACK TO THE CHANCELLOR HOUSE. A SHELL FROM A CONFEDERATE CANNON STRUCK A PILLAR THAT HOOKER WAS LEANING AGAINST AND KNOCKED HIM TO THE GROUND. HE WAS DAZED FOR 2 HOURS AND IN THIS TIME THERE WAS NO ONE IN CHARGE. LEE BROKE OFF THE ATTACK TO SPLIT HIS ARMY AND ATTACK SEDGWICK WHO WAS ADVANCING FROM FREDRICKSBURG. WITH A VICTORY THERE, LEE RETURNED ONLY TO FIND HOOKER HAD WITHDRAWN. DILGER HAD LOST 1 GUN, 28 HORSES, 1 MAN KILLED, AND 9 MEN WOUNDED, 3 OF THEM BADLY. THIRTY YEARS LATER, ON THE 17 OF AUGUST 1893, CONGRESS AWARDED DILGER HIS MEDAL OF HONOR FOR HIS ACTION. THE CITATION READ "FOUGHT HIS GUNS UNTIL ENEMY WERE UPON HIM, THEN WITH ONE GUN HAULED IN THE ROAD BY HAND HE FORMED THE REAR GUARD AND KEPT THE ENEMY AT BAY BY THE RAPIDITY OF HIS FIRE AND WAS THE LAST MAN IN THE RETREAT." DILGER RESPONDED "IT IS HIGHLY GRATIFYING TO ME AN OLD PROFESSIONAL SOLDIER TO HAVE MY SERVICES...EVEN AFTER A LAPSE OF THIRTY YEARS AT LAST OFFICIALLY APPRECIATED AND HANDSOMELY REWARDED."

AFTER CHANCELLORSVILLE THE ARMIES RESUMED THEIR PREVIOUS POSITIONS. HOWEVER LEE WAS BUSY DEVELOPING A STRATEGY TO BREAK THE STALEMATE AT FREDREICKSBURG AND RELIEVE THE THREAT TO RICHMOND. HE PLANNED TO MOVE NORTH INTO PENNSYLVANNIA AND TRY TO LURE AND DEFEAT HOOKER'S ARMY.

WHEN AN IMAGINED THREAT TO WASHINGTON CAME UP, HOOKER MOVED THE ARMY NORTH. DURING THIS MARCH DILGER, WHO ALWAYS KEPT IN MIND THE WELL-BEING OF HIS MEN, PUT HIS MEN UP IN A CHURCH FOR A NIGHT'S REST. GENERAL HOWARD ORDERED THEIR REMOVAL AS CHURCH SERVICES WERE TO BE HELD THE NEXT MORNING. DILGER REFUSED, BUT PROMISED TO HAVE HIS MEN OUT IN TIME FOR SERVICES. HOWARD SENT A COURIER TO DEMAND SURRENDER OF THE INSUBORDINATE OFFICER'S SWORD AND THREATENED COURT MARSHAL. DILGER AS COCKY AS EVER, HANDED HIS HANDSOME GERMAN SABRE TO HIS ORDERLY FOR SAFEKEEPING AND GAVE HIS ORDERLY'S SWORD TO THE COURIER, WHICH HE THOUGHT WAS GOOD ENOUGH FOR HOWARD. HOOKER INTERVENED FOR DILGER , SAYING HE WAS TOO VALUABLE A SOLDIER TO BE LOST OVER SUCH A MINOR INCIDENT.

HOOKER ASKING FOR REINFORCEMENTS FROM HARPERS FERRY WAS DENIED AND SO HE ASKED TO BE RELIEVED OF COMMAND. THIS WAS GLADLY OBLIGED BY GENERAL-IN-CHIEF HALLECK WHO DID NOT CARE FOR HOOKER. GENERAL MEADE TOOK COMMAND ON JUNE 28TH.

WHEN MEADE TOOK COMMAND, CONFEDERATE TROOPS HAD ALREADY ENTERED PENNSYLVANIA AND HAD REACHED CARLISLE. MEADE ANTICIPATING THAT LEE WOULD ADVANCE ON BALTIMORE, PLANNED A STAND NEAR TANEYTOWN. MEANWHILE HE SENT A CAVALRY FORCE FORCE TO RECON GETTYSBURG. LEE HEARING REPORTS OF MEADE'S ARMY THREATENING THE REB REAR DECIDED TO MAKE A DEFENSIVE POSITION AT CASHTOWN. A REBEL BRIGADE WAS SENT TO GETTYSBURG TO GET BADLY NEEDED SUPPLIES. THE REBELS RAN INTO THE CAVALRY AND WITHDREW AND REPORTED. SINCE LEE HAD NOT MADE CASHTOWN YET, AND GENERAL A. P. HILL IN COMMAND ON THE SPOT COMMITTED HIS CORP TO TEST THE STRENGTH OF THE UNION FORCE. SO BEGAN THE FIRST DAY OF GETTYSBURG.

AT 10 AM DILGER AND HIS MEN ARRIVED AT GETTYSBURG AND WAS ORDERED TO TAKE A POSITION NEAR GETTYSBURG COLLEGE BETWEEN HARRISBURG ROAD AND ANOTHER ROAD THAT LEADS TO MUMMASBURG. GIVEN A FREE REIGN OF WHERE TO PUT HIS BATTERY, DILGER SENT A SECTION UNDER LT. SCRIPTURE, ON THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE FIELD. A FOUR GUN BATTERY OF THE ENEMY IMMEDIATELY OPENED FIRE AT ABOUT 1400 YARDS. THIS COMPELED DILGER TO PUT HIS WHOLE BATTERY INTO ACTION. DURING THIS HEAVY ARTILLERY DUEL, THE REBELS HAD BEEN REINFORCED BY EIGHT MORE GUNS OF WHICH TWO ADVANCED WITHIN 800 TO 1000 YARDS. BUT HE FINALLY SUCCEEDED IN SILENCING THEM, WITH THE LOSS OF FIVE CARRIAGES THAT THE REBELS HAD TO LEAVE AFTER SEVERAL ATTEMPTS TO BRING THEM TO THE REAR WITH HORSES. IT WAS REPORTED BY OBSERVERS ON BOTH SIDES THAT ONE OF THE REBEL GUNS WAS PLUGGED WITH A CANNON BALL FROM A GUN SIGHTED BY DILGER.

A SHORT TIME AFTER, LT WHEELERS RIFLED BATTERY WAS BROUGHT UP AND DILGER WAS PUT IN COMMAND OF BOTH BATTERYS. WITH THE LONG RANGE RIFLED GUNS NOW IN PLACE, DILGER MOVED HIS GUNS FORWARD. HE ADVANCED LT. WEIDMANS SECTION 600 YARDS ON THEIR RIGHT ONTO HARRISBURG ROAD AND ADVANCED HIS OTHER FOUR PIECES ON THE LEFT.

IN ADVANCING, A DITCH, 5 FEET WIDE AND 4 FEET DEEP WAS ENCOUNTERED. USING SURROUNDING FENCE THE BATTERY FILLED THE DITCH SO AS THEY COULD GET THEIR GUNS ACROSS, ALL THIS WHILE THEY WERE UNDER HEAVY FIRE. WITH HIS PIECES IN POSITION, DILGER HAD LT WHEELER ADVANCE WITH HIS GUNS. THERE THEY REMAINED UNTIL REBEL INFANTRY MASSED ABOUT 100 YARDS WITH SUPPORT FROM ABOUT 4 BATTERIES. THEY CAUSED GREAT DAMAGE TO HIS MEN AND HORSES DISABLING ONE OF HIS PIECES AND ONE OF WHEELERS. IT WAS SAID OF DILGER THAT HE SHOULD PUT BAYONETS ON HIS GUNS SINCE HE LIKED TO ADVANCE UP SO CLOSE TO THE REBEL INFANTRY LINES. DILGER'S USE OF RAPID FIRE MADE HIM EMPLOY THREE OF HIS CAISSONS ALWAYS TO CARRY AMMUNITION, AND AS RAPIDLY AS HE DIRECTED THE FIRE HE NEARLY RAN OUT TWICE.

WITH THE UNION FORCES OUTNUMBERED AND BEING PUSHED BACK, DILGER WITHDREW BOTH HIS BATTERY AND WHEELER'S. SINCE WHEELER'S RIFLED GUNS WERE LESS EFFECTIVE AT CLOSE RANGE, HE SENT THEM WITH 3 OF HIS GUNS TO THE REAR. USING HIS TWO REMAINING GUNS, HE SUPPORTED THE WITHDRAW THROUGH GETTYSBURG, SETTING UP HIS GUNS AT THE SQUARE AND FIRING DOWN BETWEEN THE ROW OF HOUSES, UNTIL HIS GUNS WERE ALMOST OVERRUN. HE THEN WITHDREW TO CEMETERY HILL WHERE HIS OTHER 3 GUNS WERE. AS DARKNESS APPROACHED, THE FIGHTING SUBSIDED AND THE 3RD CORP ARRIVED TO TAKE UP POSITIONS WITH THE 2ND AND 12TH NOT FAR BEHIND.

IT WAS HERE THAT THE 11TH CORP WAS GIVEN IT'S NAME "THE FLYING DUTCHMAN." BECAUSE OF THE DISASTER AT CHANCELLORSVIILLE AND NOW THE RETREAT AT GETTYSBURG THE 11TH WAS DUBBED A JONAS. THERE HAD BEEN PREJUDICES AGAINST GERMAN-AMERICAN'S BEFORE AND DURING THE WAR. HIGH RANKING OFFICIALS IN THE WAR DEPARTMENT DID NOT TRUST THESE IMIGRANTS THAT SPOKE WITH ACCENTS AND GERMAN CUSTOMS. THE MAJORITY OF THE GERMANS BEING KEPT AT DIVISION AND BRIGADE LEVEL COMMANDERS. FEW IF ANY OTHER CORP IN THE ARMY COULD STAND UP TO THE OVERWHELMING FORCES THAT PLAGUED THE 11TH AT CHANCELLORSVILLE AND GETTYSBURG.

THE NEXT DAY FOUND DILGER'S BATTERY LOCATED AT THE APEX OF THE CURVED LINE. LEE DECIDED TO ATTACK THE TWO FLANKS, THE FAMOUS STAND AT LITTLE ROUND TOP AND CEMETERY HILL. IT WAS HERE THAT THE REBELS CAME THE CLOSES TO BREAKING A HOLE IN THE FEDERAL LINES. THERE WAS HAND TO HAND COMBAT ALONG THE LINE, BUT THE UNION FORCES DID NOT YIELD. IT WAS REPORTED THAT THE REBELS HAD PENETRATED THE LINE WHERE DILGER'S BATTERY WAS AND IT WAS SAID "A BIG GERMAN GUNNER, SWINGING HIS RAMMER LIKE A BASEBALL BAT, YELLED 'PY GOLLY, YOU REBEL FELLERS CAN'T HAF OUR GUNS."

AFTER TRYING THE FLANKS AND FAILING. LEE DECIDED TO ATTACK THE MIDDLE, BRINGING ON PICKETT'S CHARGE. BATTERY I DID NOT SEE ACTION THIS LAST DAY. AFTER THE BATTLE WAS ALL OVER, BATTERY I SUFFERED 13 MEN AS CASUALTIES AND ONE GUN OUT OF ACTION. 28 HORSES WERE KILLED AND OTHERS MERELY WOUNDED HAD TO BE DESTROYED. THE ARMIES OF LEE AND MEADE RETIRED TO THEIR EARLIER POSITIONS AFTER GETTYSBURG. NIETHER ONE STRONG ENOUGH TO DEFEAT THE OTHER. THE REST OF 1863 JUST SAW SKIRMISHING IN THE EAST. NOT SO AROUND CHATTANOOGA THOUGH. GEN ROSECRAN'S ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND SUFFERED A GREAT DEFEAT AT CHICKMAUGA. RETREATING BACK INTO CHATTANOOGA, ROSECRAN'S IMMEDIATELY BEGAN FORTIFING THE CITY. WASHINGTON SEEING THE THREAT TO ROSECRAN'S, SENT REINFORCEMENTS FROM GRANT'S WESTERN ARMY AND PARTS OF THE INACTIVE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC. ON SEPTEMBER 23RD, THE 11TH AND 12TH CORP BOARDED TRAINS THAT CARRIED THEM 1200 MILES TO BRIDGEPORT, ALABAMA. WHEN THEY ARRIVED THEY FOUND GRANT WAS NOW COMMANDER OF THE MILITARY DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI AND REPLACED ROSECRAN'S WITH THOMAS AS COMMANDER OF THE ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. GRANT'S NEW COMMAND INCLUDED THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE TENNESSEE (UNDER SHERMAN), THE OHIO (BURNSIDE), THE CUMBERLAND (THOMAS), AND THE 11TH AND 12TH CORP (HOOKER). GRANT ARRIVED ON OCTOBER 23RD, A MONTH AFTER THE ARMY HAD DUG IN.

WITH SUPPLIES BEING DISRUPTED BECAUSE OF THE ROUGH TERRAIN AND THE ARTILLERY POSTED ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, THOMAS WAS DESPERATE. HE DEVISED A PLAN TO FLOAT 1800 MEN DOWNSTREAM AND TAKE THE FERRY LANDING ON THE OTHER SIDE. WITH THIS ACCOMPLISHED THEY USED THEIR BOATS TO MAKE A BRIDGE AND WERE JOINED BY 2200 MEN. MEANWHILE, THE 11TH CORP WAS MARCHING FROM BRIDGEPORT TO LOOKOUT VALLEY. WHEN THEY ARRIVED THEY JOINED UP WITH THE 4000 MEN OF THOMAS'S ARMY AND ATTACKED THE REBELS. WITH THE VALLEY CLEAR, SUPPLIES WERE ABLE TO BE BROUGHT IN FROM BRIDGEPORT AND BY RIVER. BUT THOMAS'S ARMY JOINED BY THE 11TH, 12TH, AND THE ARRIVING 15TH CORPS, REMAINED BOTTLED UP BY BRAGG'S REBELS ON MISSIONARY RIDGE. HOWARD AND THE 11TH CORP WERE ASSIGNED THE NORTHERN END OF THE UNION DEFENSIVE LINE. THE 12TH ON THE RIGHT IN LOOKOUT VALLEY, ABOUT TO LAUNCH AN ASSAULT ON THE MOUNTAIN. THOMAS IN THE CENTER, TO MAKE READY FOR A BREAKOUT WHEN SHERMAN'S 15TH CORP ARRIVED. WHEN THE ATTACK CAME ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN BY THE 12TH CORP, BATTERY I WAS POSITIONED ON MOCCASIN POINT TO SUPPORT. THE FEDERALS TOOK THE MOUNTAIN AND HOWARD WROTE THAT DILGER'S FIRE WAS VERY EFFECTIVE. WITH LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN TAKEN, THE PLAN TO BREAKOUT WAS ON FOR THE 25TH. DILGER STILL IN SUPPORT OF THE 12TH CORP MISSED THE ATTACK ON THE REB FORCES AT MISSIONARY RIDGE. WHEN THEY FINALLY CAUGHT UP WITH THE 11TH CORP IT WAS THE EVENING OF THE NEXT DAY. THE ATTACK HAD PUSHED THE REBELS OUT OF THE CHATTANOOGA AREA AND THE SIEGE WAS LIFTED.

GRANT ON NOVEMBER 30TH WAS CONCERNED THAT KNOXVILLE MIGHT FALL AND IT AND EASTERN TENNESSEE WOULD BE LOST. BUT AFTER THE 11TH CORP ARRIVED AT KNOXVILLE, THE THREAT WAS GONE. SO THEY RETURNED TO CHATTANOOGA. DURING THIS MARCH DILGER REPORTED LOSING 20 HORSES, IN ADDITION TO THE 25 THEY LOST DURING THE PREVIOUS WEEKS. THE BATTERY WENT INTO WINTER QUARTERS IN LOOKOUT VALLEY. THE WINTER WAS HARSH AND THE SHELTERS WERE MAKE SHIFT. THEY WERE PUT ON GARRISON DUTY.

ON JANUARY 13, GENERAL THOMAS GRANTED DILGER A LEAVE OF ABSENCE. DILGER'S REASON FOR THE LEAVE? TO FORM A REGIMENT SO HE COULD GET PROMOTED. DILGER WENT TO NEW YORK CITY AND STAYED WITH HIS UNCLE LOUIS. DILGER HAD BEEN TRYING FOR ALONG TIME TO GET A PROMOTION. THE ARTILLERY, UNLIKE THE INFANTRY, DID NOT HAVE HEAVY LOSSES OF OFFICERS ABOVE CAPTAIN. SINCE, THERE WAS NO NEED TO REPLACE HIGHER UPS. ALSO, DILGER WAS TO VALUABLE ON THE LINE AND PROMOTING HIM WOULD REDUCE HIS USEFULNESS. ALSO HIS OUTSPOKENNESS AND FRANKNESS DID NOT MAKE HIM A POPULAR OFFICER WITH SOME HIGHER UPS. THE ONLY WAY TO GET PROMOTED WAS TO ORGANIZE A REGIMENT OF INFANTRY AND BE MADE IT'S COMMANDING OFFICER. THIS WAS DIFFICULT, ESPECIALLY IN NEW YORK. THE DRAFT RIOTS AND MINIMAL ENTHUSIAM FOR THE WAR DID NOT GET HIM MANY RECRUITS. AS HIS 20 DAY LEAVE DREW NEAR, HE REQUESTED AN EXTENSION. A MONTH LATER HE RECEIVED NO REPLY AND IN THE MEANTIME HAD BEEN OFFERED A PROMOTION IN ANOTHER BRANCH OF THE SERVICE. HE WROTE AGAIN THE THE ADJUTANT GENERAL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND AND ASKED FOR AN EXTENSION OR TO ACCEPT HIS RESIGNATION SO HE COULD JOIN THE OTHER SERVICE. HIS REQUEST WAS ENDORSED AND FORWARDED WITH APPROVAL BY THE COMMANDER OF THE GARRISON ARTILLERY. BUT WITH THE REQUEST WAS A NOTE FROM THE COMMANDER SAYING THAT HE FELT DILGER WAS USING HIS LEAVE TO SEEK PROMOTION. HE WANTED DILGER ORDERED BACK TO REJOIN THE GARRISON. UPON RECEIVING THIS, THE DEPARTMENT REQUESTED INFORMATION FROM ACTING COMMANDER LT. DAMMERT WHO WROTE BACK "CAPT DILGER RECEIVED A LEAVE ON THE 13TH OF JANUARY LAST, I SUPPOSE FOR 20 DAYS BUT AM NOT POSITIVE AS I DID NOT SEE THE DOCUMENT. SINCE THAT TIME I HAVE HEARD NOTHING FROM HIM, AND DO NOT KNOW WHERE HE IS AT PRESENT, OR WHAT HAS PREVENTED HIM FROM REJOINING HIS COMMAND."

BRIGADIER GENERAL BRANNON, CHIEF OF ARTILLERY, DID NOT WANT TO LOSE SUCH A GOOD MAN SO HE DISAPPROVED THE RESIGNATION REQUEST AND ORDERED THAT DILGER RETURN TO HIS COMMAND. MORE THEN TWO WEEKS PASSED AND STILL NO WORD FROM DILGER. ON APRIL 12TH, REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, BRANNON LEARNED THAT DILGER WAS CONSIDERED ABSCENT WITHOUT AUTHORITY AS OF MARCH 16TH. THE REST IS OBSCURE, BUT DILGER RETURNED ON APRIL 14, 1864. HE REMAINED A CAPTAIN.

ON MAY 6TH, BATTERY I AND DILGER BROKE CAMP AND MARCHED WITH SHERMAN'S ARMY SOUTH ATTACHED TO THE ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND UNDER THOMAS. ON TO ATLANTA WAS CRIED OUT BY THE BOYS. THEIR FIRST ENGAGEMENT CAME AT BUZZARD ROOST PASS. MCPHERSON HELD BACK AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE DALTON WAS LOST.

JOHNSTON FELL BACK TO RESACA AND SHERMAN FOLLOWED. THE 4TH CORP ATTACKED AT NOON ON THE 14TH WITH BATTERY I IN SUPPORT. A VIOLENT ARTILLERY DUEL PRECEDED AN INFANTRY FIREFIGHT THAT LASTED UNTIL MIDNIGHT. AFTER A MAJOR CONFRONTATION THE NEXT DAY, JOHNSTON AGAIN WITHDREW. JOHNSTON CONTINUED WITHDRAWING AND THEN MAKING A STAND. SHERMAN CONTINUED ADVANCING AND LEAP-FROGGING AROUND STRONG POSITIONS.

FIGHTING CONTINUED DOWN TOWARDS ATLANTA, WHEN IN FRONT OF PINE MOUNTAIN, DILGER WAS PUT INCHARGE OF TWO BATTERIES. HERE HE ENGAGED IN A HEAVY ARTILLERY DUEL WITH THE REBS. ON THE FLATS BELOW THE MOUNTAIN, SHERMAN WAS INSPECTING THE LINES WHEN THREE CONFEDERATE GENERALS APPEARED ON THE RIDGE. SHERMAN REMARKING ON THE BRAZENESS OF THIS DISPLAY ORDERED HOWARD TO FIRE ON THEM. HOWARD PASSED A MESSAGE ALONG TO DILGER'S BATTERY. THE ORDER WAS UNNECESSARY FOR DILGER ALREADY AIMED AND FIRED. THE FIRST SALVO FELL CLOSE TO IT'S TARGET. JOHNSTON ORDERED EVERONE TO COVER. EVERYONE EXCEPT BISHOP POLK TOOK COVER AS THE SECOND SALVO ARRIVED. THE THIRD SALVO FOUND IT'S MARK HITTING POLK IN THE LEFT ARM, TORE OPEN HIS STOMACH, TOOK HIS RIGHT ARM AND CONTINUED ON IT'S FLIGHT.

DILGER'S BATTERY'S SAW ACTION THROUGHOUT THE BATTLE OF KENESAW MOUNTAIN. ARRIVING ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF ATLANTA, DILGER PARTICIPATED IN THE BOMBARDMENT OF ATLANTA. THEY PARTICIPATED IN THE BATTLE OF PEACH TREE CREEK AND OTHER ASSAULTS THAT HOOD RAN AGAINST THEM. BUT WHEN THE BATTLE OF ATLANTA CAME TO AN END, DILGER AND BATTERY I MISSED THE CELEBRATION BEING SENT BACK TO CHATTANOOGA FOR GARRISON DUTY.

IN AUGUST OF 1864, DILGER WAS GIVEN LEAVE TO RETURN TO NEW YORK. THERE HE BECAME FRIENDS WITH DR. HEINRICH TIEDEMANN AND CAME TO KNOW HIS DAUGHTER ELISE. BY THE TIME HIS LEAVE WAS UP, HE AND ELISE WERE IN LOVE. SINCE THE DOCTOR KNEW GEN. CARL SCHURZ, DILGER ASKED HIM TO USE HIS INFLUENCE TO GET HIM A PROMOTION. ON RETURNING TO THE BATTERY, DILGER FOUND HE HAD BEEN PROMOTED TO A BREVET MAJOR.

DILGER AND THE BATTERY SETTLED DOWN TO GARRISON WORK THE REST OF THE WAR. DILGER PASSED THE TIME WRITING LETTERS AND DRAWING IN HIS SKETCH BOOK, WHICH WOULD BE BURNED UP IN A FIRE IN 1900. DILGER HATED CHATTANOOGA AND GARRISON DUTY. THE ONLY EXCITEMENT WAS FALSE ALARMS OR A JAUNT OUT OF THE FORT TO GO HUNTING. THE BATTERY WAS DISCHARGED AND THE MEN RETURNED TO THERE HOMES AND FARMS.


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