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Where are Chilocco Students Now?
John Wayne King


John Wayne King - Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma.

Raised in the Bois d’ Arc area near Ponca City, Oklahoma

Attended Chilocco  1954-56.

John met and later married Reta Wesley.

They had 5 children and have lost 3 of them as of 9/05.
One of the high points in a pow-wow for children is that of the Indian Clown and this is what he was in California.
He was also a Men's straight dancer.  This is one of most the respected group of male dancers.

He helped form the Elders organization at the Urban Inter-tribal Center in Dallas, Texas in 2000.

John now lives in Mesquite Texas.

He is a five year survivor of stomach cancer.

He founded a non profit organization 501C3 to purchase new coats and shoes for Native American kids in the Metroplex of Dallas Texas called Zhinga-Wee-Thay in 2002.
John, one year, bought coats for Ponca children in Ponca City regardless of whether they were on
the roll or not.
 
He is retired and loves to work outside and visit and talk to anyone that will listen.
Web site link at the bottom.
PS.  He is still living!

http://quicksitebuilder.cnet.com/bdk811/poncajohnamptexastweetyourlives/index.html

John King is a natural leader and is associated with his family of the Gives Waters.  This story I wrote about the afternoon he invited us to that special family event they have each year:  I changed John King's name to John Gives Waters in this story: I video taped the event and many people have viewed and enjoyed the beauty of that afternoon these years later.

http://electricscotland.com/history/america/donna/william_clark.htm

I have great respect for John because I know how hard it is to become successful in that great metropolis of Dallas even when a person is non Indian much less, someone like John who has a strong Native American presence.  Not only did John succeed with his own business in that world but he has gone on to live through the most difficult of times to battle cancer.  I hope you will go to his home page to share his joy in living.  He is, indeed, an inspiration.


Aunt Donna,

March 7, 2012

John King had his surgery yesterday and they took out 2 gall stones from his bile duct the 1st one was 1 in long by 1/2 in around, the 2nd one was a little smaller but not by much. He came through the surgery like a champ, he is in a lot of pain in ICU as of last night before we all left. They said it was best for him to be in ICU so they can watch him better for the first 24-48 after surgery because of his stints and pace maker. The Dr said that hopefully this will take care of a lot of his problems, that we will have to see. I will get an update later on, on how he is doing. Will do my best to keep you updated.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

John King was a student at Chilocco the years I was there, 1955. He didn't graduate at Chilocco but went into the service. Later he graduated at Ponca City High School.

John was raised by my cousin Jenny who was married to John's father, Funston King.

His family's burial plot is next to my family at the White Eagle cemetery so we always had one time a year to catch up on visiting.

John was a business man in Dallas, Texas, no small accomplishment for a Native American man who had a heavy Ponca accent and strong Ponca ways. Nevertheless, he had to be admired for his achievements there.

I have a nice video of the Gives Waters private camp grounds yearly ceremony with John as the central figure. His lively bantar and ways of joking with every day happenings has been caught on the short most enjoyable tape.

He knew the old ways and wound them in through his conversation. His calling attention to the elders present in a loving, admiring way, yet joking with them as if they were pillars of strength still, was a classic example of how the leaders of the tribe once showed respect for the older ones. Too bad, too bad, those ones are leaving our time and space to create a void to find us with fewer and fewer reminders of the "ways of peace," practiced by the Ponca.

Donna


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