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Nancy Bellzona's Picture Book
The Osages - Elsie Loho, Big Eagle, Rusk


Bertha on left, Elsie Loho on right and the child is Ura May.On the right, Elsie Loho, Big Eagle, Rusk. Her Indian name: Wah-Shah-Hah-Me, allotment number, 793, roll number, 528. She was full Osage, born January 1, 1890 and died January 10, 1949. She was the mother of Bertha Big Eagle, Jones. Elsie was married to Harry Big Eagle, allotment number 497, roll number 527. He was full Osage, and he was born January 1, 1886. He died September 14, 1931.

Lee Otis Jones wrote Lohokawally, shortened to Loho, on the back of this photograph. The name is more accurately O-Loha-Walla.

Bertha is on the left. Her allotment number is: 2143, roll number 529. Her Indian name, " Metza he," is the term used for the first daughter. The Osage roll book shows her to be born June 1, 1906. The family Bible shows, April 1906. She died, January 31, 1938.

The child in the picture is Ura May. She was born May 2, 1923, died November 11, 1974.

These photographs were passed on by Lee in 1986 upon his death. This current date is December 1999 to begin the millennium he always talked about.

This will be, hopefully, the last entry. It is one coming from Duanne Big Eagle. He writes, "Bertha Big Eagle was my half aunt; Harry Big Eagle was my father's father and my grandfather. My grandmother was named Myrtle Goad. Harry Big Eagle had ten children; 1. Bertha (with Elsie Loho (O-Loha-Walla), Big Eagle, Rusk), five children with his wife Florence: 2. Homer 3. Mildred, 4.Imogene, 5.Mamie, and 6.Hayes. There were twins 7. Ed and 8. Bill Petzamoie, 9. Flora Dobbins BigEagle 10. and Norman BigEagle (with Myrtle Goad)."

The methods on writing a book like this is, for the student, a trial and no one should begin such a task without knowing the pitfalls. Suspicions as to the author's motives can bring fierce retaliation down on the author and the family of that person or anyone else associated. There is no office too lofty not to not come under these attacks. This must be forgiven and understood because of the deep scars suffered by families. Information sometimes is shaded to defend actions when family members feel they must protect their ancestors from the permanence of the written word. Usually, the truth wills out, but only after much sifting and after putting oneself at risk in order to find the truth. At this time the author must decide upon how much of the information must be included for posterity. The information is on permanent record and anyone who wishes to go to the above expense can search records.

Let this warning be included. It is a recommendation that no one attempt a work like this without carefully considering any one or all of the above.

True, the rewards are great also. To become acquainted with the heirs of the folks who were but a picture is an uncommon joy. Everyone who contributed bits and pieces of information a little at a time, made for the overall design just as a beautiful piece of quilted piece work comes together; so, the healing begins as rest over dark nights trials may cause a brighter tomorrow when we go into this new millennium.