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Nancy Bellzona's Picture Book
The Joneses - Edward Frenchman


Edward Frenchman

The Joneses - Edward Frenchman, his wife of the Perry family, and
possibly his son by his first wife Dora Jones Frenchman. This photograph, circa 1906. The child would be a son of Ed's first wife and; therefore, a grandson of William Stephens Jones, who was Dora Jones's father.

    A very old newspaper clipping shows that this woman died in the same tragic way as Edward's first wife, Dora (Doshia) Jones.

    1880 roll: page 102, #1073, Ed Frenchman, Coo-Weet-Scoo-Weet. 1896 roll: page 368, # 274, Edward Frenchman.

    As the accurate meaning of many names of Ponca people has been lost through the passage of time so too maybe the name Coo-Weet'-Scoo-Weet' (accent on both Weets). It is the custom of the Cherokees to pass a name down from ancestor to descendant just as the Ponca's do. This was the Indian name of chief John Ross, of Scot descent.

    Edward's handwriting on the documents from the archives shows the script to be quite attractive, with well-formed letters, properly spaced and placed on the line. There is not a great flourish except on the F.

    It is interesting to note, Ed's second wife, Perry, died tragically in the same manner as his first wife. Jerry Young, author, found the newspaper clippings on the accident.

    It is common for the Jones children to be fair and blond, but when they grow up their hair is almost black. This is probably Dennis, Ed's child by his first wife, Dora (Doshia) Jones.

    The following is from a document dated October 9, 1900:

Q. How long have you lived in the Cherokee Nation?
A. All my life. Born here.

Q. What is the name of your father?
A. Frenchman is all he goes by.

Q. Is he dead or alive?
A. Alive

Q. What is the name of your mother?
A. I don't remember, she has an Indian name. She's been dead seven years.

Q. Do you remember her English name?
A. Didn't have any English name.

Q. What did you call her in Indian?
A. I couldn't speak it.

Q. How did you speak to your mother?
A. I never called her by name.

Q. Did you call her Mother?
A. Yes sir.

     On another document dated October 31, 1902 is a question and answer statement by Frank Frenchman, brother to Edward Frenchman telling that Dora Jones and Edward Frenchman were married in 1888. At the time Frank was forty-six. Through the questioning the two men keep bringing up the fact that they are Delaware Indian as well as Cherokee.

     Edward's first wife, Dora (Doshia) is pictured earlier.

Absolutely!

You are also completely correct about the Cherokee territory connection. That band of Delawares made a treaty with the Cherokees in 1850-something for their land around Copan/Dewey. They are called “Cherokee-Delaware” on the Dawes rolls, but if you look at the rolls and see their tribal affiliation, it is documented as Delaware. That does cause some confusion.

The Cherokees had already settled in the Eastern part of Oklahoma by then, they moved after the Indian Removal Act (1830) of Andrew Jackson fame, and came to Oklahoma during their Trail of Tears in 1838.

Also, Edward Frenchman is not a Cherokee descendent, they are quite proud of being full-blood Delaware, which they pretty much are give or take a few 16ths here and there. I did notice that one of Dora’s brothers was married to a woman by the last name of Ross, and I’m thinking that may be where the Cherokee connection with John Ross is from.

Again, thank you so much for being willing to share your wonderful collection – your stories are fascinating too – I’m sharing them with my daughter – she’s a history buff too and it’s her family and her Dad’s family that is from that area. I just love doing the family tree stuff!

Kathy Fabunan


 

 


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