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River Dee
From Tait's Edinburgh Magazine


There are two Dees in Scotland—the Galloway Dee in the south-west, and the Aberdeenshire Dee in the north-east. Ours is the northern Dee, the largest and the most interesting. The sources of the Dee are in many respects more remarkable than those of any other British river; but they are accessible only by toil and labour which few tourists are willing to encounter; although drovers and other travellers from the south to the north of Scotland often ascend Glendee and pass by Altdrui into Speyside. The mountains of Glendee are undoubtedly the highest and the most remarkable in the island; yet the guide-books either leave them “out of the Highlands" or pass them over in a few lines that tell one truth at least, namely, that the writers never have been there. A graphic description of Glendee is quoted in several guide-books—in the Gazetteer published by the Messrs. Blackie, and in other works—from an early nun of “Chambers’ Journal.” It has been often republished, is considered the standard account of the matter, and therefore we insert it here in order to correct a very large “oversight:”—

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Also

The River Dee
It's Aspect and History
By J.S. Howson D.D. and Alfred Rimmer (1889)

Between source and sea, the Dee drops 4300 feet, the greatest fall from source of any river in the UK. In this remarkable program we follow its course as it charts its way from its birthplace in the magnificent Cairngorms down through Braemar and Royal Deeside towards Aboyne, Banchory and Aberdeen where it meets the North Sea. Scotland the Land is a fascinating series bringing us stunning aerial views of some of Scotland's most famous rivers and the treasured landscapes they run through.


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