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Scots Australian History
Log of the Ship Dauntless


A LOG OF THE SHIP DAUNTLESS WHICH SAILED FROM GREENOCK, 17th FEB. 1840 WITH ABOUT 150 PASSENGERS FOR ADELAIDE, PORT PHILIP AND SYDNEY. KEPT BY JAMES FALCONER. Thanks to Paul Falconer for letting us publish this and to Lina Moffitt for helping us to get this published. The original log is now in the Mitchell Library, Sydney.

SHIP DAUNTLESS / DAY MONDAY 17th FEB. 1840 11 a.m. Weighed anchor and sailed from tail of the bank, Greenock. Wind easterley. 8 p.m.- Between Connall Light House and Campbelltown. Midnightspoke the Cables for Adelaide and Sydney.

18th FEB. 6 a.m. Running out the North Channel. Wind East by South. Caldee about 5 miles ahead. Saw several sails at a distance. 4 p.m.- Passed a brig beating westward. 11 p.m.- Blowing hard, most of the passengers sick.

19th FEB. 7 a.m. Sails set. Wind blowing from South, standing West by North. 2 p.m.- Stove in all the water casks on deck in consequence of being loaded very heavily, having a fine Stallion and Mare an deck, the property of P. INGLIS ESQ., bound for Port Philip. The longboat and horse houses, though lashed to the deck, nearly washed overboard. 7 p.m.- Still blowing very hard from South and the ship rolling tremendously. The passengers still very sick and the state of the steerage was now becoming dreadful. Very little attention being paid to their comfort. 8 p.m.- Ship laying to.

20th FEB. 8 a.m. Still laying to and found the Stallion dead in his stall by not being properly secured and the severe rolling of the ship. MIDNIGHT Still laying to and wind blowing very hard from the South. Steerage passengers beginning to be very discontented, no victuales being served out since Monday night and plenty of cooking going on for Cabin passengers, Ship still and many passengers very sick and the steerage in a dreadful state, nothing to eat, they begged for preserve meat and it would not be granted. The Surgeon of the ship, my own master, Dr. FLETCHER using every exersion in his power to relieve the people. Mate got one of his fingers broken endeavouring to secure the longboat from going overboard. Strong gale from the South. Two sheep killed by the longboat. Blowing a whole gale.

21st. FEB. 8 a.m. Found the poor Mare killed in a singular manner. Saw a square rigged vessel a few miles to seaward. 1 p.m.- Horses both thrown overboard. Ship drifting West North West, two knots an hour. 4 p.m.- Saw an immense shoal of porpoises spouted about for sometime and went windward. 8 p.m.- Still blowing harder and ship laying to. The people very hungry and rations still denied. This was thought a hard case by everyone. Had it not been for the kindness of some of the crew, many of the steerage passengers would have died, lasting on nothing but tea for some days.

22d FEB. 8 a.m. Still laying to. Blowing very hard from South. Shipping a good many seas. Drifted to seaward of a brig laying to. Wind blowing hard with no alteration. All the hatches batoned down. The people being kept without water till 2 O'clock, broke through the bulk head Into forecastle in order to get warm water which had been boiling about four hours.

23d FEB, Preserve meat was to have been served out today instead of which the Captain was heard to say keep the hatches down but first to throw them down a bag of biscuits. The Doctor coming amongst them seemed to give them a little consolation, but it is hoped when we come to more moderate weather, that we will get our rations more regularly served out.

24th FEB. 8 a.m. Wind South East. Ship looking West by South, laying to and drifting about 1˝ knots an hour. The place is now well cleaned and the people are a little more comfortable. 8 p.m.- Wind more moderate and ship under way.

25th FEB. 6 a.m. Wind South by East and ship laying West by South going 5 knots an hour. 4 p.m.- Still looking West by South in latitude 55 North and 18 West longitude.

26th FEB. 6 a.m. Wind S by E. Ship running W by S. 5 p.m.Moderate breeze and ship running W by S about 4˝ knots an hour.

27th FEB. 1 a.m. Wind SW. Put ship about on the other tack and running SE by S.

28th FEB 6 a.m. Wind SW. Ship running SE, 4˝ knots. 10 a.m.- Laid round on the other tack and running NW. Breeze moderate. Obliged to make out a third complaint in writing to the Doctor against the Captain of the quality and irregularity of our rations, besides which we have made numerous other complaints since sailing. 7 p.m.- Wind still blowing right ahead from SW and ship put about on the other tack again and making a SE course

29th FEB. 6 a.m. Wind SW. Ship running alternately SE and NW. 12 NOON- Wind taken fairly of and ship making nothing being a real calm. 6 pm. - No wind and sails flapping laxily against the masts. 10 p.m.- A very light breeze from the NW and the ship moving slowly SW, her direct course by observation, we were in 53˝ North latitude and 20 West longitude. There was a birth on board this day.

1st MARCH 6 a.m. (14 days out-Sabbath) Breeze taken off and ship moving about with the swell at pleasure. 12 NOON- A light breeze sprung up from SSE and ship going WSW about 4 knots. The Captain read prayers on the quarter deck and went through the English form of Baptism with two children. 8 p.m. Ships course and wind as before. The weather serene and clear.

2d MARCH 6 a.m. Wind SE. Ship going SW, 5 knots an hour. 8 p.m.- Wind and course as before.

3d MARCH 6 a.m. Wind S by E, blowing heavily. Ship making a course W by S. 12 NOON- Blowing hard and sailors reefing topsails. Wind and course as before in North latitude 50˝ and longitude 24 West. Saw a large ship to leaward appearingly homeward bound for BRITAIN. 8 p.m.- Wind increasing and a heavy sea running. Some of the women sick.

4th MARCH 6 a.m. Wind SSE. Ship making a course of SW by W and the ship rolling very much. 1 p.m. - Saw a large ship running eastward. 6 p.m. It blew a severe gale and ship rolling tremendously.

5 MARCH 7 a.m. Ship still making a SW by W course about 3 knots an hour having four close reefed sails up. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 49 West Long. 24˝ Raining very hard, wind abated. 5 p.m.- Raining very hard and wind entirely off, sea running very high. Captain and two of the married men passengers quarreled. Captain was for putting them in irons but the crew refuse their assistance. The Captain seem bent on keeping from the passengers and crew their just demands. There seems to be enmity between Captain and everyone in the ship, Mates not excepted.

6th MARCH 6 a.m. Becalmed. An excellent sheep dog belonging to my brother died. 8 p.m.- Still calm and night most beautiful.

7 MARCH 6 a.m. Fresh breeze sprung up from S. Right ahead of us, ship running westerley. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 48 and 27 West Long. Put ship round an other tack. Running E by S, 4 knots an hour. 4 p.m. Mutiny broke out between Captain and some of the sailors. A few of the sailors drunk and refused to return to duty, 8 p.m.- Dispute still continuing and all the sailors below refusing to do duty till their wrongs are redressed. 12 MIDNIGHT- Wind S. Ship going E by S. The Captain and crew are still on the same terms. The mutineers still keep a man at the wheel but the Captain Mates and Carpenter have all the work to do on deck themselves. The Cook has joined the mutineers.

8th MARCH-SABBATH 6 p.m. Fresh breeze and ship making a course S by E. Crew have refused to turn out, they still keep a man at the wheel. The ship is wrought by the Mate's Boatswain, Carpenter and bays. A fine fresh sailing breeze which is fortunate as the ship could not be managed were a squal to arise. 12 1001 -Several communications passed between forecastle and Officers but no accommodation arrived. 2 p.m. - Divine service was performed by the Doctor. 8 p.m. - No reconcilement has yet been made and the crew for running the ship back to Britain. All the fire arms, swords and cutlasses are all secured in the Cabin and proposing to fire down an the crew if they would not yield obedience by turning up if they are required during the night. Passengers in an almost alarming state of mind especially the ladies. 10 p.m.- A squal sprung up and crew refused to shorten sail. The Captain then applied to the passengers who sprang out of bed with great elacrity to assist in shortening sail. This had the effect of causing the whole of the mutinying crew to turn up and after the sails were reduced and the squal having passed by, the crew were addressed by the Officers before all the male passengers when they promised to turn to duty, the Captain having pledged himself to redress grievances, They were informed of the preparations which had been made for then during the last 3 hours. Upwards of 100 musket balls having been made, and about 20 guns and pistols loaded and ready to fire down the forecastle amongst them, whereby, some of then must have been shot. 12 MIDNIGHT- All going on quietly.

9th MARCH 6 a.m. Wind S. Ship going E by S, 5 knots an hour. 8 p. m. Wind still ahead from S, ship on other tack going SW.

10th MARCH 7 a.m. Wind still from S. 8 a.m.- Saw a French Brig which sailed by the stern about a mile distant running northward. The Mate hoisted the number of the ship and they only hoisted the French flag. 12 NOON - becalmed. MIDNIGHT- A light breeze arose from the E.

11th MARCH 6 a.m. A fine breeze from E and the ship going her course S about 3 knots an hour. 12 NOON- Hoisted a fore top mizzen sail. Ship running about 6 knots an hour. 9 p.m.- No alteration.

12th MARCH 6 a.m. Wind E by S. Ship running S by W 4˝ knots an hour. 12 NOON- As above. 8 p.m.- Wind as before. Ship running 5˝ knots an hour. AS we did not get a sight of the sun today, we did not get our bearings taken

13th MARCH 6 a.m. Blowing fresh from E. Ship running S, 7 knots an hour. 12 NOON - In north lat. 43 40" 8 p.m.- The same as above.

14th MARCH 6 a.m. Fresh breeze from E. Ship running S, 6 knots an hour. 12 NOON- Running between the Azore Islands and PORTUGAL in north Lat. 41˝ and 19 West Long. 8 p.m.- Running as in the morning, the weather very dark, cold and cloudy. Saw no land since the evening after sailing.

15th MARCH SABBATH 6 a.m. Fresh breeze E. Ship still running S, 7 knots an hour. Weather very dark. 10 a.m.- Saw three vessels at a distance, one of which had no canvas up except the fore top sail all torn to pieces with the wind. The Captain seeing her in such a state, steered toward her, came within a quarter of a mile of her. The Captain saw that there was no person on board alive, he then held the ship's course. She was waterlogged and was completely sunk. She was loaded with timber or oil. The Spanish colours were up. The waves were washing over her and every time the ship did rise with the swell, the water was coming out of her Cabin windows. It was a Spanish vessel. A large Brig seemingly abandoned 10 day or a fortnight. She appears like as if she had been boarded several times, her yards all clean but two and a great number of her cables away and bullworks all broken. 8 p.m.- No alteration.

16th MARCH 7 a.m. Wind N by E. Ship running about 7˝ knots an hour. Saw a great deal of porpoises, ran before the ship. 6 p.m.- Saw a small vessel to leaward. No alteration.

17th MARCH 6 a.m. Very calm wind X. Sailing very little, the weather clear. 12 NOON- Becalmed and very warn in N Lat. 34 43" and 18 W Long. 8 p.m. - Still becalmed.

18th MARCH 6 a.m. Wind SW and the Island of MADEIRA in sight to eastward. 9 a.m.- Wind SW being right ahead, ship going NW. 2 p.m.- Wind round to W by N, ship running SSW, 3˝ knots an hour. 9 p.m.- In the Lat. of MADEIRA about 30 miles to westward of it.

19th MARCH 6 a. m. Becalmed. NOON- Becalmed. 2 p.m. - Light breeze f rom S. 4 p.m.- Becalmed. 6 p.m.- Fresh breeze from W, ship going S by W, 4˝ knots an hour. 10 p.m.- Blowing hard from W, ship running 6 knots SSW. Communicated by signals at noon with a Spanish schooner.

20th MARCH 6 a.m. Making a SSW course 9 knots an hour. NOON- Becalmed in Worth Lat. 31 40". 10 p.m.- The day has been very warm. We have seen several flocks of porpoises and a shark for the first we have yet observed.

21st MARCH 6 a.m. Becalmed. 10 a.m.- A light breeze from SE, ship running SW, 3˝ knots an hour. At noon we were in North Lat 31 13".

22d MARCH SUNDAY 5 a.m. Wind SE. 11 a.m.- The Dr. performed divine service on the quarter deck. 5 p.m.- Strong breeze from SE. Saw several vessels to windward. 9 p.m.- Still blowing hard. A large ship close to us at windward, The night was dark. The Captain burned a blue light and the other vessel did the same. She passed very close to our bows but not within hail. She appeared to be bound for SOUTH AMERICA.

23d MARCH MONDAY 6 a.m. Light wind from SE, Going SW. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 29. Wind more ahead. 8 p.m. - Fresh breeze from S, ship going W. Saw a Bark to windward. She has been in sight the whole day. 10 p.m.- Wind right ahead from SW. Running W by N.

24th MARCH TUESDAY 6 a.m. Wind SW, running SSE. 10 a.m.- Saw a sail to windward. 12 NOON- 3 large grampoises of the whale species swam for a short time along side of us. Mr DOVE, a cabin passenger, wounded one of them with a musket ball, then they all took off. 10 p.m.- The night clear and beautiful.

25th MARCH WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Wind SW, running SE. 12 NOON- Several sails in sight. Wind very light. In North Lat. 28 9". 8 p.m.- Fancied we saw CANARY ISLANDS this afternoon but could not be certain. Night warm and beautiful.

26th MARCH THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind SE, ship going SW. Squals from E, S, and SW, with very heavy rain and lightning. 11 p.m.- Becalmed. 2 p.m.- Light breeze from SSE, ship going SW. 9 p.m.- Fresh breeze from S, ship going W by S. Saw several vessels during the day . At 12 noon, we were in North Lat. 27 35". The CANARY ISLANDS visible to the SE.

27th MARCH FRIDAY 6 a.m. Fresh breeze from NW, ship going S by W. 12 NOONWind nearer the N and ship running 6 knots an hour. 8 p.m.- Very calm and the day has been very warm, and in North Lat. 26 37".

28th MARCH SATURDAY 6 a.m. Becalmed. A schooner seen at a great distance from the stern. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 25 6", West Long. 20 36". 5 p.m. - The schooner made up with us. We spoke her. She was from GUERNSEY for RIODE-JAKEIRO, out 19 days. 9 p.m. Fresh breeze from E, ship running SSW about 4 knots an hour. Night very clear with a great deal of lightning. By reckoning of the schooner, we were in North Lat. 23 1911.

29th MARCH SABBATH 6 a.m. Wind SW, blowing hard, ship going WNW. NOON - Communicated with a bark lying to windward but at a good distance and the sea running high. We could only make out her number. Her name being CONNECTTICUT. 5 p.m. - Put round on the other tack. The wind WSW, ship running S by E. 9 p.m.- Blowing hard. The Captain baptised two children today.

30th MARCH MONDAY (43 days out) 5 a.m. - Wind West, ship running S. Saw several sails at a distance. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 22 34". 2 P.m.- Wind NW, ship going SW, 5 knots an hour. 9 p.m.- No alteration.

31st MARCH TUESDAY 6 a.m. Wind NE, ship going SSW. 12 NOON- We were in North Lat. 20 10", West Long. 22. There was a trial by Jury on the quarter deck today of a passenger upon whose person the Mate had found two bottles of wine. He was condemned to 14 day on bread and water. 10 p.m.- Wind NE, ship going SSW. 7 knots an hour.

1st APRIL WEDNESDAY 1840 6 a.m. Wind NE, ship going S by W. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 17 3911, West Long. 21 29". 9 p.m.- Running S by W, 7 knots an hour. The Island of BONA VISTA a few miles of from our starboard side but not visible owing to the darkness.

2d APRIL THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind N, ship going S, 6 knots an hour. It having blown a good breeze during the night, we have passed all the CAPE VERDE ISLANDS on our right hand. NOON- In Worth Lat 15 1", West Long. 21 17". About 200 miles off the mouth of the river GAMBIA. 9 p.m.- Wind E, going S. Saw great numbers of flying fish, some dolphin and several sharks. The Worth Pole now appearing very low in the horizon. There was a flying fish alighted on the deck this evening.

3d APRIL FRIDAY 6 a.m. Wind NE, ship going SSW. NOON- In North Lat. 12 4111, going 7 knots an hour. It is excessive warm, sun being nearly vertical. 9 p.m.- Wind as before.

4th APRIL SATURDAY 6 a.m. Wind NE, ship going S by W. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 10 16". Very warm. 9 p.m.- Going S by W, 7 knots an hour.

5th APRIL SUNDAY 5 a.m. Wind as above. Saw a Bark to leaward about 6 miles off, appearingly going SSW. NOON- In North Lat. 8 7" and West Long. 22. 1 p.m.- The Bark came along side. She was the ISABELLA of LONDON from DUBLIN with troops for the ISLE OF FRANCE, out 31 days and had called at FENEZIOFF, one of the CAPE VERDE ISLANDS. The Captain performed worship on the quarter deck at 11 a.m. today, in the manner according to the English Church.

6th APRIL MONDAY 6 p.m. Wind NE but very light. NOON- In North Lat. 6 47". The sun being now a good way on the North side of the line, we had it vertical today. 9 p.m.- The wind being very light today, the heat was very great.

7th APRIL TUESDAY 6 a.m. Nearly becalmed. 12 NOON- In North Lat. 5 611, West Long. 21 3011. 9 p. m. - Wind NE but very light.

8th APRIL WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Wind very light from WE. Several sails in sight. Communicated by signals with a Brig. She wished us to send her a Mate as she had lost her Mate overboard 5 days ago. Afterwards she lay to and spoke us. Her name was the LIBERAL of LONDON from PLYMOUTH to CALIFORNIA, out 21 days. lone of our hands who could undertake the office of a Mate would go and Mr. WYLIE, our 2d Mate, would not be allowed by the Captain, although willing himself. The 'avi' being cloudy and the wind variable, we did not get the Lat. today. 4 p.m.- Wind NE but very light, ship going S by W.

9th APRIL THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind variable and light. NOON- In North Lat. 3 22". 9 p.m.- Becalmed and tremendous rain.

10th APRIL FRIDAY 6 a.m. Becalmed. 8 p.m.- Squally with tremendous pours of water. 11 p.m.- becalmed. At noon today, we were in North Lat. 3 1811.

11th APRIL SATURDAY 6 a.m. Becalmed. 12 NOON- in North Lat. 3 go'. Communicated by signals with a Schooner from LONDON called the WATER LILLY, bound for SYDNEY, out 28 days. 4 p.m.- A light breeze from NE.

12th APRIL SABBATH 6 a.m. Wind variable and heavy falls of rain. 7 p.m.- No alteration.

13th APRIL MONDAY 6 a.m. Wind from NE and several sails in sight. NOON - Becalmed.

14th APRIL TUESDAY 6 a.m. Wind from E but very light. Ship going SSW. NOON - In North Lat. 1 22". The heat has been excessive for the last eight days. 9 p.m.- Nearly becalmed.

15th APRIL WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Light breeze from E. Ships course SSW. NOON - In North Lat. 0 2911, West Long. 19 50". 6 p.m.- Fresh breeze from SSW, ship going SW. 11 p.m.- Was as near as we can account by our dead reckoning, we are now on the IDEAL LINE in West Long. 20. One of the sailors dressed as NEPTUNE and came upon deck and some of the superstitious phrases a going through but owing to the unhappy feeling that still exists between the Captain and his crew, the ceremony of shaving is dispensed with.

16th APRIL THURSDAY ( 60 days out ) 6 a.m. Strong breeze from SSE, ship going SW, 5 knots an hour. 8 a.m.- Communicated with a Brig called the FLA from AMSTERDAM for the CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 1 5" , West Long. 20 30". 9 p.m.- Wind and course as before.

17th APRIL FRIDAY 6 a.m. Wind SSE, ships course SW. NOON- In South Lat. 3 111. 9 p. m, - No alteration.

18th APRIL SATURDAY 6 a.m.- Light breeze from SSE, ship steering SW.

19th APRIL SUNDAY 5 a.m.- Wind and course as before. 12 NOON- Divine service performed by the Doctor on the quarter deck. We are in South Lat. 5 43".

20th APRIL MONDAY 6 a.m.- Strong breeze from SE, ships course SW. 12 NOON - In South Lat. 7 46" West Long. 25 15". 9 p.m.- Blowing hard from SE, ship going SW 5 knots an hour. Today, we are about half way between the ISLAND of ASCENSION and PERNANABRAN.

21st APRIL TUESDAY 6 a.m.- Wind and course as before, running about 6 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 9 26". 9 p.m.- Blowing hard from SSE.

22d APRIL WEDNESDAY 6 a.m.- Blowing fresh from SSE, ship going SW. 9 p.m. A young man, the son of MAJOR BINGALLY of the Army was intending to follow a sea-faring life by going out in the DAUNTLESS, an experimental voyage, fell overboard while in the act of stepping over the bows of the vessel going to ease himself, cried out for help several times. While the vessel was passing him, a hen coop was thrown overboard to him and the vessel laid to on the wind and the boat lowered and manned with all expedition to go search for him. Several lights were burned on the ship. The bell was rung and every exersion that was possible was made but the night being very dark, the boat returned after the elapse of half an hour after a fruitless search. They did not even find the hen coop. There were three live geese in it. Whether he had got hold of it or not, we could not say owing to the darkness of the night and the rapid rate the ship was running at the time. 10 p.m. - Ship under way again. Everyone in the vessel is concerned about poor BINGALLY. He was a very engaging young man, about 18 years of age. I was talking with him for the space of an hour this night and had just left him about fifteen minutes before the fatal accident happened.

23d APRIL THURSDAY 6 a.m. Blowing very hard from SSE, ship going SSW. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 13 4511 West Long. 28.

24th APRIL FRIDAY 5 a.m. Wind E by S, ship's course S. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 15 13", West Long. 28 201'. 9 p.m. Blowing hard from ESE.

25th APRIL SATURDAY 6 a.m. Light wind from E by S. Squally with rain. 9 p.m. Nearly becalmed.

26th APRIL SUNDAY 6 a.m. Light wind from SSE, ship going SW. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 19 3811, West Long. 28 35". The ISLAND OF TRINIDADE AN VAIN MARK in sight to the southward.

27th APRIL MONDAY 6 a.m. Strong breeze from the SE. The island sighted yesterday afternoon bearing eastward. NOON- A gale of wind from SE with a heavy swell from SW and ship labouring a great deal.

28th APRIL TUESDAY 6 a.m. Squally from SE, ship's course SW by W. 9 p.m. Blowing very hard from SE.

29th APRIL WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Blowing hard from SE. 7 a.m.- There is a child belonging to JANES X. WALTERS died just now. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 23 50", West Long. 32 9". The funeral of the Child took place at noon. The Captain reading the funeral service according to the form of the English Church. 9 p.m. Blowing fresh from SE.

30th APRIL THURSDAY 6 a.m. Nearly becalmed. 12 NOON- Wind ESE, ship going S by W in South Lat. 25 21", West Long. 33 1711

1st MAY FRIDAY ( 75 days out ) 6 a.m. Becalmed. A ship in sight to north of us, 10 a.m.- A light breeze from the south put the ship on the other tack. Ship going ESE 2 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In South Lat 25 55'1 and West Long. 35 4011. A Bark ahead of us going ESE.

2d MAY SATURDAY 6 a.m. Wind S by E, ship going E by N. NOON- Wind round right ahead to SE, ship put an other tack and going SSW 3 knots an hour. 9 p.m.- Wind from SSE.

3d MAY SUNDAY 6 a.m. Wind very light from SSE, ship's course SW. NOON- In South Lat. 27 4", West Long. 32. A Bark to windward but too far off for communicating with by signals. Divine service was performed by the DOCTOR this forenoon.

4th MAY MONDAY 6 a.m. Wind variable, ship going alternately E and SW. 9 p.m.- Wind fresh from SE.

5th NAY TUESDAY 6 a.m. Wind E by S, ship going S by E. A sail in sight to leaward. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 28 21", West Long. 33 0" .

6th MAY WEDNESDAY 7 a.m. Wind fresh from EKE, ship going SE 5 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 29 59", West Long. 31 3211. 4 p.m.- Blowing hard from ENE, ship going SE by E 7 knots an hour.

7th MAY THURSDAY 6 a.m. Blowing fresh from N ship going ESE 7 knots an hour. 9 p.m.- Wind and course as before.

8th MAY FRIDAY 6 a.m. Blowing very hard from NNE, ship going ESE 8 knots an hour. 10 a.m.- Strong squalls and showers. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 32 2011, and West Long. 26 12". 4 p.m.- Blowing very hard from NNE, ship going ESE 8˝ knots an hour.

9th MAY SATURDAY 6 a.m. Blowing a gale from N by E, ship going EWE 8 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 33 and West Long. 22 15" 9 p.m.- Blowing a severe gale, ship running under close reefed topsails 10 knots an hour.

10th NAY SABBATH 6 a.m. Light breeze from SW. 12 NOON- becalmed with rain. 9 p.m.- becalmed and clear. The Dr. read the sermon in the steerage this forenoon.

11th MAY MONDAY 6 a.m. Fresh breeze from NE, ship going ESE. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 34, West Long. 18 2211. Several albatrosses flying about.

12th MAY TUESDAY 6 a.m. Strong breeze from SE, ship going ENE 9 knots an hour, 9 p.m.- Wind and course as it was in the morning.

13th MAY WEDNESDAY 5 a.m. Wind N, ship going E 8 knots an hour. 9 p.m. Blowing fresh from N.( I was born 13th MAY 1818 at 11 p.m.)

14th MAY THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind 1, ship going easterly 7 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 34 40" , West Long. 7˝, Saw a ship since morning steering by S.

15th MAY FRIDAY 6 a.m. Steering easterly, wind N by W. 4 p.m.Wind SW, ship going E by 1 with a very light breeze.

16th MAY SATURDAY 6 a.m. Wind SE, ship going ESE with a light breeze. 4 p.m.- Wind increased from SE at noon today. We were in South Lat. 34 East Long. 0 13".

17th MAY SUNDAY 6 a.m. Wind continuing right ahead from SE, ship going EWE. 11 a.m.Passed close by a Brig beating to windward. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 33, East Long. 1 2511. Put the ship about on the other tack and now goes SW by S.

18th MAY MONDAY 7 a.m. Wind still from SE, ship going SSW. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 34˝" , East Long. 0. 7 p.m. Ship going S by E from that day Monday till 23d becalmed and head winds.

23d MAY SATURDAY 6 a.m. Nothing particular occured till this day. Wind SE, ship going SW. Spoke a Bark called the REBECCA of LONDON bound for SYDNEY out 75 days. We are out 96 days. A great many albatrosses flying about. One of the cabin passengers shot one of them. The Captain ordered the boat to be lowered and they brought the bird on deck. It measured 9 feet 8 inches from wing to wing and 3 feet from head to tail. 12 NOON- We are in South Lat 36 V, East Long 5˝".

24th MAY SUNDAY 6 a.m. Wind ESE, ship going S by W 4 knots an hour. 12 NOON- Becalmed.

25th MAY MONDAY 6 a.m. Still becalmed. A light breeze sprung up about noon ESE, steering S by W. 9 p.m.- Fresh breeze from SSE.

26th MAY TUESDAY 7 a.m. Becalmed. Spoke a Bark from LONDON bound for SYDNEY. We lost our signal book this day and has not another on board. I do not think we can speak another vessel for the want of it. We sent our boat on board the other vessel for a signal book but they had none. She was named the POTTER from LONDON sailed the same day as us but had called in at MADEIRA and lay there two weeks. We sent away our boat about 2 o'clock and it did not return till seven. We are now about 250 miles from the CAPE of GOOD HOPE.

27th MAY WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Still becalmed. The same vessel lying close to us. She sent her boat to our ship with Chief Mate Steward and four sailors. The Captain being unwell, they wanted our Doctor on board to see him. The most of our sailors got drunk and one of then knocked the Captain and threatened to throw him overboard.

28th MAY THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind from E, ship going SE 4 knots an hour. The same vessel still with us. We sent some of our cabin passengers to the other vessel with their boat. They sent one cabin passenger and Captain to dine on board the DAUNTLESS. 6 p.m.- They separated with cheers and guns, pistols and cannons firing. Today we are in East Long. 15 VC', South Lat 35 28" about 120 miles from the CAPE.

29th MAY FRIDAY 6 a.m. Wind NE, ship going for course SE by E half E. 4 p.m.- Blowing hard from NE.

30th MAY SATURDAY 0 a.m. This day we are passing the CAPE with fair wind. The sea running very high and the ship rolling about dreadfully with lightning and thunder.

31st MAY SUNDAY 6 a.m. Nearly becalmed. Ship rolling very much with the heavy swell of the sea. 11 a.m.- Divine service performed by the Doctor between decks.

1st JUNE MONDAY 6 a.m. Fresh breeze from 1, ship running her direct course SE by E ˝E. 12 NOON- In East Long. 22 16" .

2d JUNE TUESDAY 6 a.m. Light breeze from NE, ship going SE by E. 8 p.m.- No alteration.

3d JUNE WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Wind from NE and sailing very little. Saw a vessel to leaward, the POTTER still astern of us.

4th JUNE THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind nearly ahead from East. Ship steering S by E, 6˝ knots an hour. 5 p.m.- The POTTER is now along side and communications by signals passed between our ship and the POTTER.

FRIDAY 5 JUNE 6 a.m. Wind still from E, ship running SSE about 6 knots an hour. 12 NOON- The wind a little more favourable. In East Long. 29 32". 4 p.m. Strong breeze from N, ship going her course. 9 p.m.- Blowing very hard.

6th JUNE SATURDAY 7 a.m. Wind right astern from WNW. Saw the POTTER to leaward. 12 NOON- In East Long. 34 15" . Ship rolling very much, running about 8 knots an hour.

7th JUNE SUNDAY 5 a.m. Wind still favourable. Ship running about 7 knots an hour under close reefed topsails. 12 NOON- Divine service performed by the Doctor in the steerage.

8th JUNE MONDAY 6 a.m. Wind still the same, blowing hard. 11 p.m.- Very heavy rain with thunder and lightning. The Captain came out of bed and ordered the sailors down out of the rigging. He was afraid of the lightning. I never heard or saw such heavy rain in SCOTLAND.

9th JUNE TUESDAY 6 a.m. Blowing a little easier and the reefs let out of the topsails and set more sail with foretopmast studding sail and lower stunsail. 12 NOON- In East Long. 47 10". 6 p.m.- Ship running about 8 knots an hour. 10 p.m.- Running about 10 knots an hour. Blowing very hard and shortening sail.

10th JUNE WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Blowing very hard and running under reefed topsails, 8˝ knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 51 20" and south Lat. 35 3". 10 p.m.- Blowing very hard, running about 9 knots an hour. We saw the South Pole for the first time.

11th JUNE THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind still favourable and ship running 8 knots an hour. Saw a vessel to leaward today, tossing about very much, shipping a good many seas. 12 NOON- In East Long. 55 3". Blowing very hard. 12 MIDNIGHT- Very squaly.

12th JUNE FRIDAY 6 a.m. Nearly becalmed. 9 a.m.- Set sail, all reefs out and a fresh breeze sprung up. Going about 6 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 58 20". At 10 p.m., running about 9˝ knots an hour. 12 MIDNIGHT Blowing very hard and squally. Under close reefed topsails again.

13th JUNE SATURDAY 4 a.m. Blowing a whole gale from SW and ship rolling very much. 8 p.m.- Set sail again and ship running about 8 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 62 5", South Lat. 37 4", 9 p.m.- Running about 7˝ knots an hour.

14th JUNE SUNDAY 6 a.m. A light breeze from SW and rainy. Running about 6 knots an hour. 12 NOON- IN East Long. 65 9", wind S. 9 p.m.- Nearly becalmed. It has been very cold this two days.

15th JUNE MONDAY 6 a.m. Wind round again to SW and a great many birds flying about. 9 a.m.- A fresh breeze sprung up. Ship running about 7˝ knots an hour. 12 NOON- IN East Long. 68 1511. 7 p.m.- In the 'exe', Steward and Carpenter was a supper. They had quarreled about something and began to fight. The Steward was a native of NORTH AMERICA, he is black. He took up the tin which his tea was in and struck the Carpenter above the eye and cut him with it. The Carpenter went after him into the Cook Galley and was pulling him out. In the scuffel, some way or other, the Steward got hold of the Carpenter's thumb in his teeth and cut it severely. The Steward then ran and the Carpenter then after him. They chased other round the ship. At last the Steward went up the fore rigging for safety and the Mate after him. He then went down the fore top gallant stay and the Mate followed him but dreading the Steward to cut the rope, he ascended again. The Steward then went down on the martingal stay and stood there a good while. At last, the Carpenter went out on the jib boom and told him to come in, that he would not lay a hand on him. The Captain came forward and ordered him in or to let go the stay and let him drop. The Steward then came in, he was ordered to the quarter deck. The Captain ordered the Mate to fetch the irons which was done. The Captain told him that he did not consider his own life safe with him loose about the ship, that he had threatened several times to put a knife in the Carpenter and the Cook and the boys in the Cabin. He was then put in irons. He resuming good courage, only said that they were not made for cats or dogs, that they were made for men and that he was willing to wear them. He was then locked up in the Hospital in the steerage.

16th JUNE TUESDAY 6 a.m. Wind still favourable and ship going about 7˝ knots an hour. Between 7 & 8 a.m. We saw a very large whale. At 12 NOON- We were in East Long. 70 45", making a due E course. 8 p.m.- Beginning to blow very hard.

17th JUNE WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Blowing very hard. Running under single reefed top sails, 8 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 75 V with a fresh breeze. 8 p.m.- Blowing hard with heavy rain.

18th JUNE THURSDAY 6 a.m. Nearly becalmed. Sails set. 10 a.m.- We saw St. PAULS or now AMSTERDAM to the southward of us in East Long. 77 43". Breeze freshening up. There was a Cape Pidgeon, caught this day with a bait on a line. 8 p.m.- Blowing very hard. Running about 8˝ knots an hour.

19th JUNE FRIDAY 4 a.m. All hands upon deck at reef topsails. Running 10 knots an hour. At noon today it was so hazy and dull, they could not take their proper bearings. 9 p.m.- Wind rather abated.

20th JUNE SATURDAY 6 a.m. A light breeze from NW, sailing about 4 knots an hour. At noon we were in East Long. 84 1011. 8 p.m.- Breeze freshening

21st JUNE SUNDAY 6 a.m. Blowing fresh. 12 NOON- Divine worship was performed by the Doctor in the steerage. 8 p.m.- Blowing hard and very cold.

22d JUNE MONDAY 6 a.m. A fresh breeze from SE, ship running about 7 knots an hour. At noon today, we were in East Long. 90, wind still continued the same all night.

23d JUNE TUESDAY 6 p.m. Nearly becalmed. Going about 2 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 93 10" . 8 p.m.- A light breeze with heavy rain.

24th JUNE WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Blowing a fresh breeze, ship sailing about 7 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 96 5", in south Lat 36˝" , A light breeze still continuing. 7 p.m.- Wind right ahead from ESE, ship heading WE by E.

25th JUNE THURSDAY 6 a.m. Wind round again to NW, ship going her course with a very light breeze. 12 NOON- In East Long. 98 24". The Captain and passengers quarelling to a great extent about them and plenty good biscuits on board. He refuses to give them. 9 p.m.- Going about 5 knots an hour.

26th JUNE FRIDAY 6 a.m. No alteration. At noon today we were in East Long. 100 911. 9 p.m.- Wind still continuing, going about 7 knots an hour.

27th JUNE SATURDAY 6 a.m. Becalmed. 12 NOON- In East Long. 102 V' with alight breeze. A Cape Pidgeon was caught and a red collar put about it's neck with the inscription thus, " SHIP DAUNTLESS, BOUND FOR SYDNEY ", the day of the month and where it was caught. 8 p.m.- A fresh breeze running about 6 knots an hour.

28th JUNE SUNDAY 6 a.m. A fresh breeze from NNE, running 7 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 105 4311. 9 p.m.- Running about 9 knots an hour.

29th JUNE MONDAY 6 a.m. Blowing very hard, running about 9 knots an hour under reefed topsails. 12 NOON- In East Long. 109 V. 10 p.m.- Wind greatly abated.

30th JUNE TUESDAY 6 a.m. Blowing fresh from SSW, running about 8 knots an hour. At 12 NOON- In East Long. 113. 8 p.m.- Blowing fresh. Capt. birthday.

1st JULY WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. Still blowing fresh and all reefs out, in East Long. 115 21".

2d JULY THURSDAY 6 a.m. Nearly becalmed. 12 NOON- In East Long. 117 35" with a fresh breeze from N. Ship going E by S, 7˝ knots an hour. 10 p.m. Blowing fresh, ship running due east.

3d JULY FRIDAY 6 a.m. Blowing fresh. Running about 8 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 120 16", South Lat. 36 53". 9 p.m.- nearly becalmed.

4th JULY SATURDAY 6 a.m. A very light breeze and wind from NW, going about 3 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 123, South Lat. 36 3611. At 9 p.m., blowing very hard from N.

5 JULY MONDAY 6 a.m. Still blowing hard, running about 9 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 127 46", in South Lat. 35 50". Running about 8˝ knots an hour under single reefed topsails. 6 p.m.- Nearly becalmed.

6 JULY TUESDAY 7 a.m. Becalmed. 10 a.m.- Wind from SW. 12 NOON- In East Long. 129. 3 p.m.- Fresh breeze from SW, ship going about 4 or 5 knots an hour. There was another albatross caught this day and flags put to it's legs and one round it's neck. We are about 400 miles from ADELAIDE, 10 p.m.- Wind nearly ahead.

7th JULY WEDNESDAY 6 a.m. A fresh breeze from ENE, ship going ESE about 5 knots an hour. 12 NOON- In East Long. 131 South Lat. 35 3711, ship going her course about 7 knots an hour. 10 p.m.- Blowing very hard. The standing Jib gave way, all hands called upon deck, all topsails close reefed. 1 a.m.- Foresail furled and the ship lay to.

8th JULY THURSDAY 4 a.m. Still laying to and blowing a dreadful hurricane. 12 NOON- It was so hazy that we could not Set an observation taken. 3 p.m.- Set sail again, running about 5 knots an hour, wind taken off a good deal. 10 p.m.- Put the ship by the wind with fore and main topsail close reefed.

9th JULY FRIDAY 6 a.m. Set sail again. It blowing very fresh and about 8 a.m. we saw KANGAROO ISLAND but not clearly on our starboard bow. About ˝ past 9 a.m. we were running about 4 miles to Northward of it. It is the beautifuled sight we have seen since we left SCOTLAND. 10 p.m.- A fine sailing breeze. There was a porpoise caught this afternoon.

10th JULY SATURDAY 6 a.m. Sailing about 6 knots an hour and throwing the lead all night. 10 a.m.- Put the ship about on the other tack to keep clear of the land. There was a vessel ran into the bay this morning before us, we saw it about 6 O'clock carrying canvas and a good deal of other vessels laying at anchor. Put the ship about again for about half an hour, then we put about again. The PILOT boat came which eased the Captain's mind a good deal and we came up the river very pleasantly, having the land on both sides. We are now arrived at the new port and now lays moored. It appears to be very level country but barren as far as we see from the ship.

11th JULY SUNDAY. After breakfast, I went ashore with a few more with me and the scene was very delightful. Nothing particular occurred but the Government passengers went all ashore on Tuesday and I accompanied them to the old Fort.

14th JULY WEDNESDAY. I went up to see the town of ADELAIDE. It appeared like a gentleman's seat. Nothing particular has occurred but five of the sailors ran away.

7th AUGUST FRIDAY 9 a.m. We began to weigh our anchors and about 4 p.m. we set sail. 7 p.m.- We dropped one anchor at the paint and lay there all night.

8th AUGUST SATURDAY 5 a.m. Weighed anchor again and set sail along with the CALDEE with a fair wind. 10 a.m.- The Pilot left us. 9 p.m.- The CALDEE is leaving us very fast. We shortened sail in case of danger. We lay to the greater part of the night.

9th AUGUST SABBATH 6 a.m. The ship under way again with a fresh and a fair breeze, running about 7 knots an hour. 10 a.m.- We passed GERVIS POINT and about ˝ past 11 a.m., we passed KANGAROO POINT. 12 NOON- A fresh breeze, sailing about 8˝ knots an hour, a S by W course. 4 p.m.- Course SE.

10th AUGUST MONDAY 6 a.m. A fresh breeze from N, running about 6 knots an hour. It was so hazy and wet, we did not get our bearings taken. 9 p.m. Course SE by E.

11th AUGUST TUESDAY 6 a.m. Becalmed, the air is very clear. 12 NOON- In South Lat. 39 411. 8 p.m.- It began to blow hard. We put one reef in our topsails.

12th AUGUST WEDNESDAY 4 a.m. It blew a severe gale. Ship running under close reefed topsails. 8 a.m.- Ship laying to with a close reefed main topsail. We lay to for the greater part of the day. The ship rolling very much.

13th AUGUST THURSDAY 6 a.m. Set sail, wind being a little abated, being in sight of land. Wind from NNW. 12 NOON- We set our mainsail and let the reefs out of our topsails. 6 p.m.- We saw we could not enter the heads tonight, we then put the ship about.

14th AUGUST FRIDAY 6 a.m. We put the ship about every two hours during the night. We now being in sight of the mouth of the river. Made for it but the wind being almost fair ahead, we could not make it. The ship having drifted from the land a considerable distance during the night, we put about again on the other tack. We saw a BRIG about 7 O'clock at the mouth of the river, bound for LAUNCESTON. "HENRY OF LAUNCESTON", the Captain spoke her, the HENRY told him if he could make the inside of the heads, to take anchorage. We put about at 11 a.m. and made inside of the heads, we dropped our starboard anchor and furled all our sails. The PILOT came about an hour afterwards. We weighed anchor about 2 p.m. and set sail again. We came through the Channel with great difficulty, the wind being right ahead, we boated ship the whole night.

15th AUGUST SATURDAY- OUR TIME BEGINS THIS DAY- 6 a.m. Sailing under close reefed topsails. 9 a.m.- We came in sight of the anchorage and it being very squally, we lost sight of them upwards of half an hour. We arrived in the harbour or bay about 11 a.m. . After dinner, the Captain and several other Gentlemen, went up to MELBOURNE.

16th AUGUST SUNDAY 7 a.m. We lowered our Pennice. If anyone wish to go ashore, they might have it on their own account and after all, the poor Captain was lost in the seas.

Additional details on the family by Lina Moffitt

Thought I should give you some family tree details on this family. Credits for all this information go to Paul Falconer of Sydney, and his father Ken.
 
Robert Falconer and Mary Bruce had the following children:
 
Robert Falconer born 30 Jul 1817 Edinburgh
James Boyle Falconer born 13 May 1818 Ed.
McVey Napier Falconer abt 1820 Ed.
William Falconer 1826 Ed. (Stayed in Scotland I think and haven't been able to trace what happened to him)
 
First 3 emigrated to Australia. Robert and James on the Dauntless 1840 and McVey Arrived Australia in 1855 on the 'LORD BURLEIGH'. McVey was the first Station Master at Homebush Railway Station and was the Station Master at Orange Railway Station when he died. He was also Station Master at Newtown Railway station in 1867 when James fell under the train.
 
death: 12903/1884  FALCONER  MCVEY N  of ROBERT and MARY
 
More about James:
 
Married Catherine Milligan who was born 13 Aug 1820 St Cuthberts Edinburgh, died 1869 Dubbo NSW of a gallstone only 5yrs after the birth of her 10th child and two years after the horrific death of James in a train collision (will send obit on this next as it is also interesting - the way it was written)

Catherine Milligan Falconer
Catherine Milligan Falconer

Catherine's parents were:

William Milligan and Elizabeth Forsythe

NSW BDM's death: 4877/1867  FALCONER  JAMES  of ROBERT and MARGURITE 
 
This is as transcribed by me from newspaper, Alastair...
Please note the bit about people "walking around unconscious". All the journalist seemed concerned about was that people were without their hats!
 
 
"LOCAL BREVITIES
FATAL ACCIDENT to Mr James Falconer
 
In 1867, a terrible railway accident occurred at Newtown when Mr James Falconer was instantly killed and a number of other person were more or less seriously injured. Up to that time this was the worst railway accident that had occurred in NSW. Mr Falconer was on a business trip to Sydney and was staying with his brother at Newtown. He was Railway Station Master there. This train took business people to the city and was crowded. Bankers, merchants and lawyers and other well known citizens among the injured. Mr Falconer, who had a station property at Laheys Creek, 2 miles this side of Cobbora, was a well respected resident of the district and in those days was a constant visitor to Mudgee where he did his banking and other business.
 
The govt of the day offered a paltry sum to his widow for the compensation owing to her husband’s death but the executors of the estate refused the amount offered. A Supreme Court case was set down for hearing in Sydney with the result that the jury  awarded a substantial verdict amounting to many thousands of dollars. The beautiful monument erected at Laheys Creek and situated in the spot near the road was placed there by Mrs Falconer and her family out of the respect of their deceased husband and father. There are many of the Falconer family living in Mudgee and outside districts who are respected and well known. The following is taken from the Sydney Empire printed in 1867:
 
“ the most serious railway collision that has lately happened on our railways yesterday morning at 9 o’clock at the Newtown railway stn...the passenger train due in Sydney at 8.49 was just leaving the Newtown station when a through-goods train, which followed, came up before the first train had acquired much speed ran into it causing a violent concussion. One passenger, Mr Falconer, brother to the station master at Newtown, was killed on the spot. A considerable number of ladies and gentlemen were seriously hurt . Most of the passengers were hurled by the violence of the concussion from one end of the carriage to the other. Many kept jumping out of the carriages panic stricken. The utmost consternation prevailed for the concussion was so sudden and unexpected that many attempted to extricate themselves before the carriages had acquired full speed. More persons were injured by jumping out of the carriages and, considering the nature of the place, it is providential that many more were not killed.
 
The carriage was crashed to atoms--the one in which Mr Falconer (deceased) was riding, and others being injured, while hundreds of others were crowding on the lines, some to ascertain the extent of the accident, others to lend assistance to remove the killed and maimed--here was a prospect of another greater and most appalling accident, had not a man with much presence of mind, ran on the line towards Sydney, and apprised the engine driver of the 9 o’clock train what had occurred, and the crowded state of the line near the Newtown station.
 
The body of James Falconer, aged 49, much mutilated was removed to the station house. Whether he jumped or was forced out of the carriage was not clear. He appears to have become entangled for his head came in contact with the basement of the landing jetty and his body was dragged for nearly 30 yards, blood flowing freely.
 
His body was much mutilated. Deceased was a married man residing at Lahey’s Creek about 40 miles beyond Mudgee. He leaves a widow and 6 children. He was we believe, a brother of the station master at Newtown. He came to Sydney about some disputed land boundary. An inquest was commenced but nothing further than the identification of the body and other preliminaries were gone into.
 
The inhabitants of Newtown, in the vicinity of the station, were prompt to render assistance. For a time all was confusion. Senior Sergeant Taylor, Sergeant Flaherty and police, were promptly on the spot. The Hon. the Minister for Works and the Hon. Henry Parkes all arrived at the station by special train. Dr Bell, Dr M’Phee, Dr Scryver, Dr Segewick and Dr Scott were also in attendance, and did good service in dressing the wounds and directing there removal to appropriate paces of the worst cases.
 
It is needless to state the various rumours as to who was to blame for this disastrous occurrence. The passenger train was five minutes late in arriving at Newtown, or in leaving Newtown. It is positively stated that the “caution signal” was exhibited, to warn the approaching luggage train. Others say the signals were not up. Amid such conflicting statements on this particular point it would be more prudent to leave the matter to the investigation of the coroner. A complete list of the injured could not be ascertained; but we have given the names of those whom the police and medical officers deemed to be most injured.
 
FURTHER PARTICULARS
 
Those  who were near and saw the accident say that the engine and tender of the luggage ggage train and the last 2 carriages of the passenger train, when the concussion took place, leaped into the air like two furious horses at war. The deceased was in the last carriage but  one, and the guard iron in front of the wheel appeared to have entered his abdomen and carried him along--dead.
 
Many persons were knocked completely stupid, and wandered about Newtown unconsciously, some with out hats, others holding their heads as if in intense agony. Some were found three hours after the occurrence, wandering like strangers in the back streets. Mr Mills, a chemist, discovered two or three of these to one of whom he lent a hat, and directed him homewards. Mr Black of Petersham was rambling about for some time astonished to find that he was up before sunrise. It must be evident that to produce stupidity and delusion of the kind the concussion must have been exceedingly violent.
 
The Coroner held an inquest on the body of James Falconer, and after hearing the evidence of McVey Falconer and Dr Scott the inquiry was adjourned.
 
The body of James Falconer, aged 49, much mutilated was removed to the station house. Whether he jumped or was forced out of the carriage was not clear. He appears to have become entangled for his head came in contact with the basement of the landing jetty and his body was dragged for nearly 30 yards, blood flowing freely. His body was much mutilated. Deceased was a married man residing at Laheys Creek. He leaves a widow and 6 children.”
 
ARRIVAL IN AUSTRALIA:
 
James, with his brother, Robert, sailed from Scotland in the ship “Dauntless” in February 1840 arriving at Melbourne in August of that year. During the voyage, James Falconer was apprenticed to the ship’s doctor. In August 1840 he married Catherine Milligan whom he had met on the “Dauntless”, also travelling out from Scotland. They had a family of 5 sons and one daughter; one son, Joseph married Gertrude Albeny, aunt of Henry Lawson, poet.
 
In the year 1845 James Falconer brought his family to Lahey’s Creek, 36 miles from Mudgee, where the wife selected 160 acres of land. James took an annual lease of five square miles. Whilst on a business trip to Sydney, James Falconer was accidentally killed at Newtown Railway station where his brother MacVey was station master. MacVey Falconer came to Australia in 1850 with his wife, who died at Stanmore in 1923 at the age of 101 years.
 
James’ eldest son, Robert, carried on the property at Lahey’s Creek where a family of five sons and three daughters were reared. Also reared with their own family was an aboriginal boy, son of Tracker McDonald of Cobbora Police Station, who afterwards became tracker for Mudgee and Dubbo Stations. He claimed the name of James Falconer McDonald."
 
end of transcript.
 
 
The "Dauntless" departed Greenock 17.2.1840 arrived Melbourne 10.7.1840. Captain William Miller.
 
(NB Henry Lawson, as you may know was a famous Aussie poet)

 

 


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