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Alberta, Past and Present, Historical and Biographical
Vol 2
Hon. Charles Wilson Cross


Hon. Charles Wilson Cross, a member of the Edmonton bar and for a number of years prominently connected with the political history of the province, being still a member of the provincial legislature, was born at Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario, on the 30th of November, 1872, and comes of Scotch ancestry. His father, Thomas Cross, was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, while his mother, who in her maidenhood was Miss Maria Mouncey, was born in Canada but of Scotch parentage. Thomas Cross became a prominent merchant of Madoc and a leading man in the life of that community.

Reared under the parental roof, Charles W. Cross acquired his more advanced education in the Upper Canada College, in Toronto University and in Osgoode Hall, and after this thorough and complete equipment for his professional career, he decided to put his knowledge to the test in the west, as he felt that the opportunities in that section of the country were superior to those of the more thickly settled east. In 1897, therefore, he made his way to Alberta and opened an office in Edmonton, where he at once entered upon the practice of law. Before long he had become a partner in the well known and prominent law firm of Short, Cross, Biggar & Ewing and almost from the beginning of his professional career he has enjoyed an extensive and growing practice, increasingly important as the years have passed by. His analytical mind enables him readily to understand the salient features of a case and his presentation of his cause before the courts is always clear, logical and convincing.

From his arrival in the province he has taken an active interest in politics and in the fall of 1905 was elected a member of the provincial parliament in the Edmonton constituency. He was immediately appointed attorney-general in the cabinet under Hon. A. C. Rutherford—a most distinguished honor for so young a man, but he proved adequate to the demands made upon him and his party never regretted having trusted the interests of the province in his hands. The public had the assurance that the rights of all would be protected and his course justified the faith that was reposed in him. He made a splendid record as attorney-general, his course constituting a most creditable chapter in the history of legal procedure in the province. Mr. Cross is still a member of the legislature but is not as active in politics as formerly, preferring to devote his attention to the private practice of law.


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