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Alberta, Past and Present, Historical and Biographical
Vol 3
John Clyde MacDonald, M.D.


Dr. John C. MacDonald, an able and successful medical practitioner of Edmonton, has had broad experience along professional lines, and holding to high ideals, he has worked earnestly and effectively to promote the Physical well-being of his fellowmen. He was born in the province of Nova Scotia, in 1868, and is of Scotch descent in the paternal line. his grandfather. Bruce MacDonald, was a native of Nova Scotia and his son, John Bruce MacDonald, father of the subject of this review, was born in that province in 1840. He married Jessie Grant, also a native of Nova Scotia, and his demise occurred in 1908, at the age of sixty-eight years. The mother is still living. Her grandfather, the Rev. Titus Smith, was a loyal subject of King George Ill of England and during the Revolutionary war period he was obliged to leave his home in the state of New York and seek refuge in Canada.

John Clyde MacDonald attended the grammar and high schools of his native province and afterward entered the medical department of Dalhousie University at Halifax, Nova Scotia, from which he was graduated in 1895. He then served as interne at the Nova Scotia Hospital for the Insane, at Halifax, and later at the Victoria General Hospital, being connected with each institution for a year, after which he acted as surgeon on a cable steamer for two years. In 1898 he returned to Nova Scotia, opening an office at Oxford, where he remained for three years, and then removed to Westville, where he followed his profession for ten years. In 1911 he went to the States for further study, spending a portion of the time in New York city, and during the winter he attended the Harvard Medical School at Boston, Massachusetts. In the spring of 1912 he located in Edmonton and has since specialized in diseases of women and children, of which he has a comprehensive understanding, building up a large practice along this line. He closely studies the cases that come under his care, and through experience, observation and research is constantly broadening his knowledge and promoting his skill. In June, 1916, during the progress of the World war, Dr. MacDonald enlisted in the Medical Corps and for two and a half years was a member of the staff of physicians for the military hospital at Edmonton.

While residing in Nova Scotia, Dr. MacDonald was married, at Elms- dale, on the 9th of December, 1906, to Miss Marian Viola Macdonald, a daughter of James Macdonald, now deceased, who for many years engaged in railroad contracting in Canada, being connected with the Canathan Pacific system for some time. Dr. and Mrs. MacDonald have become the parents of four children: Winifred Viola, the eldest married the Rev. Kenneth C. McLeod, who served as a chaplain overseas during the World war, and they have two daughters, Audrey and Mary; the other members of Dr. MacDonald's family are Percy St. Clair, who was born in 1901 and is now serving in the United States navy; James Clyde, whose birth occurred in 1903; and Carl Almon, born in 1908.

Dr. MacDonald is a Conservative in his political views and has always fulfilled the duties and obligations of citizenship. He has been called to public office, being elected mayor of Westville, Nova Scotia, in 1910, and giving to the municipality an excellent administration. He is a Baptist in religious faith and his professional connections are with the Edmonton Academy of Medicine and the Nova Scotia and Canadian Medical Associations. He is also visiting member of the Glasgow (N. S.) Hospital and fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order, in which he has taken the chapter degree, while he is likewise a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past grand. He has never been satisfied with mediocrity but is continually striving to reach a higher degree of efficiency in his work, and natural talent, acquired ability and persevering effort have brought him to a position of prominence in his profession.


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