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The Scot in New France (1535-1880)


John Patterson Geo. Black, John Burn, John Crawford, W. G. Hall, Joanna George, John Hewison, J. Gray, Maya Darling, David Douglas, F. Leslie, William Lindsay, George Wilde, Robt. Wood, Janet Smith, Fred. Petry, Lewis Harper, William Smith, James Ross, Mary Doyle, Henrietta Sewell, David Stewart, A. Anderson, Jane Sewell, John Yule, John Anderson, C. W. Grant, Angus McIntyre, Robt Ross, Robert Ritchie, John Mackie, Wm. Fraser, George Pyke, John Purss. Johnston, Wm. Hay, Joseph Stilson, Wm. Thompson, Jr., Wm. McKay, Henry Hunt, Con Adamson, Robt. Harrower, George Thompson.

Quebec, 5th October, 1802.

Some of these signatures are quite suggestive, and will add materially to the Autograph Album of the Society. The most notable is probably that of old Adam Lymburner, the cleverest of the three Lymburners, all merchants at Quebec in 1775.* Adam, according to the historian Garneau, was more distinguished for his forensic abilities and knowledge of constitutional law than for his robust allegiance to the Hanoverian succession at Quebec, when Colonel Benedict Arnold and his New Englanders so rudely knocked at our gates for admission in 1775.

According to Garneau and other historians, in the autumn of that memorable year, when the fate of British Canada hung as if by a thread, Adam Lymburner, more prudent than loyal, retired from the sorely beset fortress to Charlesbourg, possibly to Château Bigot, a shooting box then known as the "Hermitage," to meditate on the mutability of human affairs. Later on, however, in the exciting times of 1791, Adam Lymburner was deputed by the colony to England to suggest amendments to the

Adam, the oldest; John lost at sea on his voyage to England, in the fall of 1775; and Matthew, who, later on, we think was a partner in the old firm of Lymburner & Crawford, came to his end, in a melancholy manner, at the Falls of Montmorency, about 1823. Were they all brothers? we cannot say. Adam and John were.


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