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The Anecdotage of Glasgow
The Laird of Garscadden Dying in Harness


IN the early part of last century, the lairds of Kilpatrick, of which parish Garscadden forms a part, were famous for their devotion to the cup. The story of the galravich, as drinking-bouts used to be termed in Scotland, in which the Laird of Garscadden took his last draught, has been often told, but it will bear repetition. The scene occurred in the wee clachan of Law, where a considerable number of Kilpatrick lairds had congregated for the ostensible purpose of talking over some parish business. And well they talked, and better drank, each so intent on his own roystering enjoyrnent as to pay little heed to aught else; but during the orgie, the Laird of Kilmardinny, who was one of the company, observed the Laird of Garscadden to fall suddenly quiet, while a strange expression passed over his countenance. The observer said nothing regarding the circumstance, however, and the merriment went on for some time as formerly. At length,

"In the thrang o’ stories tellin’,
Shakin' hands and joking queer,"

another individual, fixing his eye on the laird, remarked:

"Is na Garscadden looking unco gash the nicht?"

"And so he may," coolly replied the Laird of Kilmardinny, "for he has been, to my knowledge, wi’ his Maker these twa hours past; I noticed him slipping awa’, puir fallow, but didna like to disturb the conviviality of the guid company by speaking o’t." lt was even so, the poor laird had died in harness.

The following epitaph on this notorious Bacchanalian plainly indicates that he was held in no great estimation among his neighbours

"Beneath this stane lies auld Garscad,
Wha loved a neibor very bad;
Now how he fends and how he fares,
The deil ane kens, and deil ane cares."


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