Additional Info

Click here to get a Printer Friendly Page

Share

Check all the Clans that have DNA Projects. If your Clan is not in the list there's a way for it to be listed. Electric Scotland's Classified Directory An amazing collection of unique holiday cottages, castles and apartments, all over Scotland in truly amazing locations.

The Scottish Nation
Balvaird


BALVAIRD, BARON, a title in the peerage of Scotland, conferred, 17th November 1641, on the Rev. Andrew Murray, who was settled minister of Abdie in Fife in 1618, second son of David Murray of Balgonie and Agnes his wife, a daughter of Moncrieffe of Moncrieffe. In 1631, on the death of Sir David Murray of Gospertie, first viscount of Stormont, the minister of Abdie succeeded to the baronies of Arngask and Kippo. He was knighted at the coronation of Charles the First in Scotland in 1633, and in 1636 he had a charter of the lands of Pitlochie, "Domino Andrew Murray de Balvaird militi." In 1638 he was a member of the famous General Assembly which met at Glasgow, of which the Rev. Alexander Henderson was moderator, and by his sound judgment, authority and moderation, he assisted greatly in allaying the heats and differences which arose among the members. He was in consequence favourably represented to the king by the Marquis of Hamilton, his majesty’s high commissioner. The same year he was deprived of the church of Abdie in consequence of the moderation of his views. Charles the First afterwards created him a peer by the title of Lord Balvaird. (Douglas’ Peerage, vol. ii. p. 542.) He was, however, prohibited by the Assembly from bearing improper titles. On the death of the second Viscount Stormont in March 1642, he succeeded to the lands, lordship, and barony of Stormont, while the title of Viscount Stormont went to the second earl of Annandale of the name of Murray. Lord Balvaird died on the 24th of September 1644. By his wife, Lady Elizabeth Carnegy, fifth daughter of the first earl of Southesk, he had five sons and three daughters. His eldest son, David, second Lord Balvaird, succeeded to the titles of Viscount Stormont and Lord Scone, on the death of James, earl of Annandale, in 1658, and the title of Lord Balvaird thenceforth became merged in that of Viscount Stormont. (See STORMANT, Viscount.)

      The Hon. James Murray, M.D., the third son of the first Lord Balvaird, was a physician of great reputation and learning. The fourth son, Sir John Murray of Drumcairnie, was appointed a lord of session in October 1681, and sat in the Scottish parliament as one of the commissioners for the county of Perth, in 1685 and 1686. By the royal commissioners he was appointed one of the lords of tlae articles in April 1686, and in July 1687 he was appointed a lord of justiciary. At the Revolution in 1688 he lost all his offices. The Hon. William Murray, the fifth son, was an advocate at the Scotch bar, and became very eminent in his profession.


Return to The Scottish Nation Index Page