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The Old Scots Navy from 1689 to 1710
The Siege of the Bass, 1691 - April, 1694


INTRODUCTION

The Bass Rock lies at the south side of the entrance to the Firth of Forth, three and a half miles off the coast of East Lothian. In 1671 King Charles II purchased it from Sir Andrew Ramsay, Lord Provost of Edinburgh presumably to make it a place of arms, and writing from Whitehall on 21st January that year the King directed the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury of Scotland to appoint some trustworthy persons ' to view the buildings of the Bass and what ordnance and cannon is requisite to be placed therein.' Later in the year the Earl of Lauderdale was appointed during his lifetime captain keeper and governor of the Bass ; and on 7th September it is recorded that the garrison was fixed at 18 soldiers with a sergeant and corporal. [State Papers Warrant Books, vol. i, pp. 76, 259, 261, 262.] It became notorious during the Covenanting struggle later in this reign as a prison where many of the Covenanters were confined and died: On 24th October, 1682, James, Earl of Perth, was appointed its sole captain and governor. [State Papers Warrant Books,, vol. vii, p. 428]. The Bass Rock was held by Charles Maitland as deputy-governor for King James on the outbreak of the Revolution, and was on 15th August, 1689, surrendered by him to Captain Archibald Dunbar for King William. Events on this fortress and state prison took a romantic turn in the summer of 1691 when Scotland was settling down under the new sovereigns. Four Jacobite prisoners said to have been captured on 1st May, 1690, at the fight at Cromdale, with the assistance of La Fosse, the sergeant of the garrison, captured the Rock on 15th June, 1691, and held it for King James. Observing that when supplies arrived several of the garrison had to leave the enceinte of the fort to help in unloading the victualling boat, they took advantage of such an occasion when Wood, the lieutenant-governor and some others of the garrison were also absent at Castletown near North Berwick, shut the gates, and turned the guns on those outside. They were soon joined by other adventurous Jacobites from Fife and the Lothians, who kept the flag of King James flying until the spring of 1694.

 

The episode is so self-contained that the papers— mostly taken from the records of the Privy Council— recounting the naval measures undertaken to reduce the Bass are given in a chapter by themselves. They give picturesque and somewhat amusing colour to the pomp of war, when royal heralds sent to the Rock more than once summoned in vain the garrison to surrender on pain of treason. They illustrate the futility of a feeble blockade commenced by one or two small Scots armed boats hired for the occasion, and the ease with which friends on the coast and occasional French privateers threw provisions and munitions of war into the island fortress. One interesting item of this siege which redeems it from comic opera was a one day's serious though futile bombardment on 14th April, 1692, by two English men-of-war, the Sheerness and the London Merchant. The log of the London Merchant is still extant in the Public Record Office, London, and the account of the bom­bardment taken therefrom shows the difficulty in those days of doing anything effective from sea against such a high and strong position.

 

In February, 1694, the Scots Privy Council began to take more effective measures than they had done before, and soon after two armed privateers, the Lyon and the Providence, whose establishments are given in detail, and a fireship were commissioned against the Bass. Either on account of this more vigorous pressure, or because there was no object in holding the Rock any longer, the garrison surrendered on 21st April, 1694, and, with all the honours of war, were allowed to go abroad to France.

 

John Hill Burton, in his account of the siege of the Bass, relies on Dr. Andrew Crichton's narrative of the siege in an appendix to the Rev. John Blackadder's Memoirs, reprinted in Miscellanea Scotica, the Melville and Leven Papers, State Trials, Memoirs of Dundee, and the Privy Council Minutes. Some additional facts are contained in the Scots Magazine of 1781, and in The Seafield Corre­spondence (Scottish History Society), pp. 114-144. The new facts given in the following chapter are material for a new and revised narrative of the episode.

 

Though the fortifications of the Bass were ordered by King William on 30th April, 1694, to be demolished, the order was not carried into effect for a considerable time. The island was in the occupation of a garrison on 9th December, 1697, when the Privy Council recom­mended ' to Lord Carmichaell, commander-in-chief for the time of his Majesty's forces within this kingdom . . . to give orders to Lieut. John Hay, governor of the garrison which lies in the isle of the Bass, being a detachment of Col. Makgill's and Col. Douglas's regiments, to disband that garrison on Monday next 13th December, and to deliver the arms to the officer of the detachment which shall come to remain in the Bass ; also to give orders to Col. Row to cause as many of the soldiers of his regiment to march into the Bass that day.' Two years later, on 2nd February, 1699, the following warrant for demolishing the fortifications of the Bass was issued: ' The Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council having considered a paragraph of a letter wrote by his Majesty to the Lords Commissioners of his Treasury upon the twelfth day of January last, anent the demolishing of the Bass, with a former letter to the Council, dated the thirty of April, 1694 years, upon the same subject, the said Lords do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury to cause demolish the fortifications of the said isle called the Bass in such method as they shall find most easy and convenient in obedience to his Majesty's letter.' This seems to have been done, for on 11th July, 1706, the cannon at Leith taken from the Bass were given over to Captain Thomas Gordon to ballast the Scots man-of-war, the Royal William, under his command.

 

On 31st July, 1706, the Crown issued a warrant[State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, vol. xxii, p. 108.] for a charter of the Bass in favour of Sir Hugh Dalrymple of North Berwick, President of the Court of Session, ' without prejudice ' to the right Lord Alexander Hay has to the solan geese of that isle to which he has right during her Majesty's pleasure, and also that her Majesty shall if she thinks fit put a garrison into or fortify the said isle as the same was formerly. The solan geese of the Bass Rock-—one of their few habitats in Scotland— afford one of the earliest examples of legislative bird protection. The Scots Parliament of 1592[The Acts of the Parliaments 0/ Scotland, vol. iii, p. 614] 'under­standing how profitably the solan geese and other fowls which haunt repair and biggs within the Isle of the Bass yearly are to the common weal of this realm,' in confirmation of an act of the Privy Council of Scotland of 21st January, 1583, authorised Mr. George Lauder of Bass to apprehend and try any persons killing them.

 

CHAPTER III

 

The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, Vol. IX, p. 78 (résumé).

29th April, 1689.

 

Charles Maitland, lieutenant-governor of the Bass, is ordered within twenty-four hours to give up command of the garrison to Archibald Dunbar, who has General MacKay's warrant. Failing hir doing so he is to be charged by a herald to derives up the same. People on the coasts of Fife and Lothian are ordered not to correspond with him or give him any provisions.

 

Ibidem, Appendix, p. 6 (résumé).

3rd May, 1689.

 

Intimation ordered to be made to the under officers and soldiers in the garrison of the Bass that they will get three months' pay if they put the place into the hands of the Estates. The same day the governor Charles Maitland is denounced a rebel and put to the horn.

 

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    19th June, 1689.

Supplication by Robert Darg.

 

His Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council having considered the supplication presented to them by Robert Darg, William Baxter, and Thomas Soutter, boatmen in the Bass, who deserted the said garrison and command of Charles Maitland upon the Estate's order, and having heard the report of Sir Thomas Moncrieff, to whom the same was remitted, they ordain James Oswald, general receiver of the cess and inland excises, to make payment to the petitioners of ten pound sterling as half a year's fee due to them at Candlemas last.

 

Act: Daniel Southerland and others who deserted the Bass.

 

His Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of Privy Council having considered the supplication presented to them by Daniel Souther-land, Patrick Neill fitt [sic] James Milne, James Kerr, William Kello, and John Dunbar, late soldiers in the Bass, who deserted the said garrison and command of Charles Maitland upon the honourable Estate's order, and having heard the report of Sir Thomas Moncrieff, to whom the same was remitted, they ordain James Oswald, general receiver of the cess and inland excise, to make payment to the petitioners of the pay of the month of February and thereafter until they entered into the service and pay of Captain Archi­bald Dunbar, now constituted governor of the Bass.

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh.    20th June, 1689.

Recommendation to His Majesty's Commissioner anent the Bass.

 

His Majesty's High Commissioner having com­municated to the Lords of Privy Council a letter directed to his Grace from Captain Archibald Dunbar, they do recommend to his Grace to give a return to Captain Dunbar's letter and to allow him to answer a parley beat by the garrison of the Bass and to offer, upon surrender thereof and all things belonging to that garrison and Captain Wallace prisoner therein, that the captain shall have his life secured, his liberty and fortune at the King's mercy, and that all the soldiers in the Bass shall have their lives, liberties and fortunes secured to them and freedom to come out with what bag­gage and provisions they have therein properly belonging to themselves, they leaving their arms behind them, and the captain being detained prisoner until his Majesty signify and declare his pleasure anent him.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    24th June, 1689.

Warrant to Capitulate with the Bass.

 

His Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council do hereby authorise and allow Captain Archibald Dunbar to treat and conclude with Charles Maitland, present governor of the Bass, for surrendering of the garrison thereof upon the articles following:-

1.      That Charles Maitland,   governor  of   the said Bass, shall be indemnified as to his life, liberty and fortune with the officers and soldiers in the said garrison, they taking oath never to carry arms against the present government under King William and Queen Mary, nor to act, consult or contrive in prejudice thereof.

2.      They are allowed to carry out with them all the goods properly belonging to them­selves.

3.      David Maitland, brother to the said Charles, is to be indemnified upon taking the oath of allegiance within forty-eight hours after surrender of the Bass.

4.      The said Charles Maitland is to deliver up the garrison within twenty-four hours into the hands of Captain Archibald Dunbar, with the cannon, arms, ammuni­tion, boat and other store belonging to the Bass.

5.      And that he put Captain Wallace, prisoner there, in the custody of the said Captain Dunbar ; for doing of all which this shall be to the said Captain Archibald Dunbar a sufficient warrant, and to the said governor and garrison sufficient security for performance of the conditions in man­ner above written.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    1st July, 1689.

Recommendation to His Majesty's Commissioner anent the Bass.

 

The Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lord High Commis­sioner his Grace to authorise Captain Dunbar to acquaint Charles Maitland, late governor of the Bass, that he is to have a quarter's pay preceding the first of May last for himself and these now in garrison with him, and upon surrender thereof and whole guns, arms and other property belonging thereto, and the present garrison marching forth of the same allow the said Charles Maitland to con­tinue for the space of one week in the said garrison in order to the transportation or disposal of the goods therein properly pertaining to himself, and afterwards appoint him to repair to this place to receive a precept for his payment upon his giving security to apply the sum to be received by him for payment of the country debt due by him and his soldiers.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    8th July, 1689.

 

The Lord High Commissioner and Lords of Council, having heard a memorial from Captain Archibald Dunbar about the garrison of the Bass, allow him to take over the said garrison from Charles Maitland, late deputy-governor thereof, on the terms offered, provided the surrender be made this week.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    16th July, 1689.

 

Remit is made by the Council to Sir John Hall, Provost of Edinburgh, to provide a small vessel to carry a few guns and ten seamen to Castletown for preventing correspondence with the Bass, and the deputy governor from taking any provisions from passing vessels or places on the shore. The men are to be provided with firearms.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    26th July, 1689.

Warrant for a Precept to Captain Dunbar.

 

The Lords of his Majesty's Privy Council do recommend to his Majesty's High Commissioner to draw a precept upon James Oswald, general receiver of the cess and inland excise, for pay­ment to Captain Archibald Dunbar of the sum of seventy-six pounds Scots for fitting and out-rigging the great boat belonging to Charles Maitland lying at North Berwick to cruise about the Bass.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol XIV, No 46 (résumé)

10th July 1689

 

            A commission is issued to Robert Wood to be lieutenant deputy governor of the garrison in the Bass under Henry Fletcher captain and governor of the said isle.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland

Edinburgh 9th August 1689

 

            The Lords of his Majesty’s Privy Council do hereby authorize and allow Captain Archibald Dunbar to treat and conclude with Charles Maitland, deputy governor of the Bass, for the surrender of that garrison upon the condition aftermentioned, viz.  Primo, that there be an indemnity to the said Charles Maitland, lieutenant governor of the Bass, and to the inferior officers and soldiers in the said garrison for their lives, liberties and fortunes ; Secundo, the said Charles Maitland is to carry out with him out of the said fort of the Bass all goods, gear, furniture and arms properly belonging to himself, and the inferior officers and soldiers their hoards and goods properly belonging to themselves ; Tertio, that David Maitland, brother to the said Charles, and all other persons be indemnified for alleged keeping correspondence with the said Charles, they enacting themselves to live peaceably with the present government under King William and Queen Mary ; Quarto, the said Charles Maitland is to deliver up the said garrison with their cannon, arms and ammunition, boats and other stores belonging to the Bass, with Captain Wallace prisoner to Captain Archibald Dunbar ; Quinto, the said Charles Maitland is to be allowed eight days' time after the signing the said articles of capitulation for transporting of his goods and plenishing, he delivering up the Bass within forty-eight hours after this is presented to him ; Sexto, that the garrison be paid the time of the surrender for the months of February, March and April last; Septimo, that the said Charles Maitland shall be in the same condition with the rest of the lieges for any debt due to him for expenses laid out upon platforms and mending of the crane and boats and other necessaries furnished by him since May 1687, whenever he shall pursue therefor before any judge competent.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    19th August, 1689.

 

The Lords recommend the Duke of Hamilton, president of the Council, to draw a precept upon the general receivers for the pay of the soldiers and officers of the Bass under the command of Captain Archibald Dunbar for the month of August.

The president of the Council delivered to Sir Thomas Moncrieff, clerk to the Treasury, the inventory of the ammunition, guns and other things in the garrison of the Bass, subscribed on 15th instant by Charles Maitland on his delivery thereof.

 

Ibidem (résumé)

Edinburgh.  27th August 1689

 

            Petition by Harry Fletcher, governor of the Bass, narrating that on the surrender of the fort of the Bass the soldiers, formerly under the command of Captain Archibald Dunbar, ere placed as a garrison therein under the petitioner’s command, but there being no provisions left in the Bass the Lords ordained that payment for the month of August should be made.  The Duke of Hamilton signed the warrant for the precept, but left before the precept itself was signed.  Further £15 sterling yearly are allowed for providing coal and other fuel for the garrison and this is the season for inlaying of the same, but it is impossible to get it in until the crane be repaired, which is now broken and altogether out of order and will take £12 sterling at least for ironwork, timber and cable.  He therefore craves a precept for the pay and fuel and repairing of the crane, and also for £10 sterling due as a half-years pay to the boatmen according to the establishment.  The Lords reccommend the Earl of Crafurd, their president, to sign a precept for these sums.

 

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh.   14th March 1690

Letter from the King in favour of Captain Archibald Dunbar.

 

The letter underwritten from his most excellent Majesty directed to the Council anent the reim­bursing Captain Dunbar of the expenses of freighting of boats and seamen for blocking up the garrison of the Bass was read and ordered to be recorded, whereof the tenor follows :—

(Sic suprascribitur) WILLIAM R.—Right trusty and entirely beloved cousin and councillor, etc. We greet you well. Whereas there having been a petition presented to us by Captain Archibald Dunbar representing that the charge and expense he was at in freighting of boats and seamen for blocking up the garrison of the Bass[In the summer of 1689]. did amount to more than one hundred and thirty pounds sterling, which, being for our service, we judge it fit he be reimbursed of the same ; therefore it is our will and pleasure, and we do hereby authorise and require you to call for the said Captain Dunbar his accounts and consider the justness of the same, and accordingly you are to give orders to our general receivers for pay­ment to him what shall be found due ; for doing of which this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at Kensington the 2nd day of January, 1689-90 and of our reign the first year, by his Majesty's command.    (Sic subscribitur)

MELVILL.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    28th March, 1690.

Recommendation to Captain Arendt van den Colick anent Lieutenant-Colonel Wilsone.

 

The Lords of Council recommend to Captain Arendt van den Colick, commander of their Majesties' good ship of war called the Stadt Breill, to receive aboard of his ship Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Wilsone, sometime prisoner within the garrison of the Bass, and to transport him to the province of Holland and let him free upon the shore of the said province of Holland without suffering him to go ashore upon any other kingdom or nation before his arrival there.

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh.  16th June 1691

Order for Reducing of the Bass

 

The Lords of their Majesties’ Privy Council being informed that, through the negligence or rather knavery of the sergeant [La Fosse] in the Bass, that island is now fallen in[to] the hands of James Hallyburton, Michael Midletoune, Patrick Roy and David Dunbar, persons who were prisoners there and who design to keep out the same, they hereby recommend to Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of their Majesties’ forces within this kingdom, to take such effectual course for reducing the said island from the hands of the said persons who are now in possession thereof as he shall think fit, and appoint the provost of Edinburgh to cause prepare a boat and such other provisions as the said Sir Thomas shall require from him in that affair; and recommend to the Lords of Treasury to cause payment be made to the said provost of Edinburgh upon the sums to be paid to him upon the said Sir Thomas his order ; and ordain Henry Fletcher with any one of their Majesties' heralds to pass to the said island of the Bass and, with their coats displayed, in their Majesties' name to require and command the foresaid persons, in whose hands the island presently is, to deliver up the same, and also to render themselves prisoners under the pain of treason, certifying them, if they do refuse, they shall be treated as traitors with all rigour and severity and that without mercy. And the said Lords appoint their Majesties' solicitor to cause intimate to the several towns on the coast of Fife and on the side of the river of Forth that they keep no correspondence with the foresaid persons in whose hands the Bass now is, nor furnish them with meat, drink or any other things whatsoever useful or comfortable to them, and that they secure and keep up their boats to the effect foresaid upon their highest peril.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    25th June, 1691.

 

The Laird of Gairletoun, [John Seatoun.] who was prisoner in the guards at the Abbey of Holyrood House for his accession to the betraying of the Bass, being brought to the bar and refusing to give distinct answers to the questions put by the president of the Council, was consigned a close prisoner to the Canongate tolbooth; and Sir Thomas Livingstone,   commander-in-chief   of   the forces in Scotland, was impowered to seize any persons he has reason to believe guilty of that act and any intercommuners with such persons.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh, 30th June, 1691.

Recommendation to the Treasury for Money to Harry Fletcher for a Boat against the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords of their Majesties' Treasury to cause payment be made to Harry Fletcher, governor of the Bass, of the sum of ten pounds sterling money for providing a boat and five seamen to serve therein for the space of one month, commencing from the date hereof, to cruise about the same for preventing any persons to enter into or come forth of the said island of the Bass, the said Harry Fletcher being always accountable to the said Lords of their Majesties' Treasury how the said sum shall be debursed by him.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    1st July, 1691.

 

Proclamation declaring James Hallyburtoune, Michael Midletoune, Patrick Roy, and David Dunbar, sometime prisoners in the fort of the Bass, who having surprised the garrison have fortified and maintain the place against the royal authority, to be open and manifest traitors, and discharging all persons from having any dealings with them without warrant of the Council under pain of sharing their fate, to be published at Edinburgh and the head burghs of Hadding-tonshire, Berwickshire, Fife and Clackmannan.

 

 

Ibidem (résumé)

Edinburgh.    9th July, 1691.

 

The Lords of Council being informed that John Seatoun of Gairletoun, whom they have in prison, seems to have had a great, if not the greatest hand in the surprising of the Bass and holding out of the same, direct the law officers to institute process against him therefor. And because Sir Patrick Home, whom the Council has joined with Mr. Hugh Dalrymple to concur with the solicitor in such processes, is uncle to the said prisoner, and Mr. Hugh Dalyrmple is sickly, they appoint the solicitor, the said Mr. Hugh Dalrymple, and Sir James Ogilvie, advocate, to proceed by taking precognitions anent the prisoner and other persons guilty with him.

 

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    30th July, 1691.

 

The Lords discharge the herring boats and other boats fishing upon the water of Forth from approaching nearer the Bass than one and a half miles without the special allowance of Mr. Henry Fletcher, governor of the Bass.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    29th August, 1691.

 

Warrant to Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of the forces in Scotland, to send some soldiers with a parley to the Bass with a printed copy of their Majesties' proclamation offer­ing indemnity to such persons therein as were in arms before 1st June last, and to demand the surrender of the island on pain of the utmost severity as traitors in respect they have forfeited the benefit of this indemnity.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh,    10th November, 1691.

 

Order is given for the liberation from the tol-booth of Edinburgh of James Suan, late gunner in the Bass, Alison Peebles, his spouse, Janet Haslep, spouse to Sergeant La Foss, Janet Hircus, his servitrix, and Robert Alisone, late porter in the Bass, they having found caution each in £100 to live peaceably and loyally, the additional penalty being added in the case of Janet Hircus of being whipped through the city of Edinburgh by the common hangman.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    15th December, 1691.

Recommendation to the Duke of Hamilton to write to the Secretary anent a Vessel before the Bass.

 

His Grace the Duke of Hamilton having pre­sented to the Council the depositions of several seamen and fishermen anent a vessel which was lately before the Bass and [de]livered several goods there, read and recommended to his Grace to write to the Secretaries acquainting them with this matter, and to send the copies of the depositions to them that they may acquaint his Majesty and receive his commands to the Council.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    18th February, 1692.

 

The Lords recommend to the Earl of Crafurd and Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of the forces in Scotland, to take trial as to what persons are under bail to the Council for being in arms or disobedient, and who of these should be presently called before the Council; also what persons of this class have been in prison and liberated on bail, and who of them should be returned to prison so that measures may be taken for inducing those who hold out the Bass to surren­der or capitulate upon account of such persons.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    15th March, 1692.

 

The Lords appoint the Earl of Lothian, Lord Polwarth and Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall to meet with Sir James Lesly, commander-in-chief of the forces for the time, and consider how vessels passing up and down the Firth may be secured against injury from the rebels in the Bass, and how these rebels are to be prevented obtaining provisions.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    22nd March, 1692.

 

The Lord Chancellor having informed the Council that last week the rebels in the Bass seized three fishing boats from Fisherrow while fishing, took all their fish from them and forced them to go the Isle of May, where they loaded them with coals and brought them to the Bass, another boat strongly armed attending them all the while, and that he had caused several of the persons who were in the fishing boats to be brought to Edinburgh to give fuller information, the Lords recommend to Lord Polwarth and Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall (as the committee formerly appointed to take trial anent a boat carried from Fisherrow to the Bass) to examine these persons as to the said incident, and add Sir John Lauder of Haltoun to the said committee, which they recommend to meet at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

By another Act of Council the Lords add Sir John Lauder of Haltoun and Sir--------------- Anstruther of that ilk to the committee appointed by them on the 15th about the Bass. Sir James Lesly, being called in, is notified to attend the committee at 4 o'clock this afternoon, and the Chancellor declares his intention to be present. The Lords desire the committee to inquire at Sir James ... as to the soldiers now lying at Castletown in garrison, part of whom formerly served in the Bass, and who is to command them seeing Henry Fletcher has resigned his commission as governor of the Bass and has been relieved thereof.

 

Sir Patrick Murray, general receiver of the crown rents, produced to the Council their Majesties' commission granted to Henry Fletcher on 10th July, 1689, appointing him captain and governor of the Isle of the Bass, and stated that Fletcher desired to be relieved of the charge and of the command of the garrison of soldiers lying at Castletown, which the Lords accepted and relieved him as desired.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    23rd March, 1692.

Committee for Securing  Trade in the Firth against the Rebels in the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the committee formerly ap­pointed ... to consider what measures are to be followed for protecting of trade in the Firth and securing the vessels trading therein from the said rebels, and to use all legal means for restraining and suppressing the attempt of the said rebels ; with power to the said committee to issue forth orders to Sir James Lesly, commander-in-chief (for the time) of their Majesties' forces within this kingdom in this matter, and to take all such legal courses therein as they shall find necessary, without necessity of acquainting the Council from time to time with their procedure until the business be brought to perfection and ready for execution ; and recommend to the Lords Com­missioners of their Majesties' Treasury to give orders to Sir Patrick Murray of Saltcoats to advance a full month's pay to the boatmen and seamen and so much as will make up a month's full pay to every soldier upon the Scots establish­ment, who shall be employed in doing service against the Bass and securing the passage in the Firth.

 

Admiralty Records—Captains' Logs.

London Merchant' Log.

 

Wednesday, 13th April. 1692.—At 4 this morning weighed with the Sheerness bound for the Isle of Bass. All run down the Firth at 11 ; anchored 17 fa., dist. 4 miles. Capt. Roope sent his boat to know if they would surrender it to King William and Queen Mary.

Thursday, 14th April.At 3 yesterday in the afternoon the Sheerness boat returned from the Bass with the governor's answer . . . that he would not surrender it, neither cared for all the
shipping or [Word illegible here]
or  what other damage we could do them. At 4 this morning weighed with the Sheerness, an easterly gale. At 6 we anchored to the southward of the island abreast of the fortifications about a cable's length astern of the Sheerness ¾ of a mile distant, with our stream anchor astern and kedge anchor on our starboard bow to keep our broadside to the batteries, which done, we both began to play our cannon on their fortification and crane, and continued battering of them and they at us.

Friday, 15th April.Fair weather, sometime calm. We continued battering and they at us till 3 yesterday in the afternoon; then the Sheerness making the signal for cutting away, we hauled up our stream anchor and roused in as much of our kedge anchor as we could, then cut him and made sail after the Sheerness for Leith road. In this action four of our men were wounded. We re­ceived one shot in the steerage, and one through the rail on the quarter-deck, and one that splintered the after part of our main topmast, and likewise the comings of our hatches shattered apieces, and the larboard side of our [Word illegible here] in the waist shattered apieces, about 70 foot. At 4 we anchored, the tide being down. At 4 this morning weighed and ran into Leith road and anchored in 7 fa. dist. 4 miles. Here rode the Sweepstakes, the Eagle ketch and the London's ketch, and 2 Dutch men-of-war.

 

The London Gazette, No. 2760.

Edinburgh.    15th April, 1692.

 

On Thursday last, the Sheerness frigate, com­manded by Captain Anthony Roope, with another frigate of 30 guns[The London Merchant—Captain Orton.] anchored within less than musket shot of the Bass, and fired upon it both great and small shot from 8 in the morning till 2 in the afternoon, which beat those within from their low works, made a breach in the upper wall, and broke down their crane, by which they drew up everything that was brought into the place. What other damage they suffered we do not know. Their men appeared but little, lying on the top of the hill in hollow places, and to save their boats they had buried them in the ground near the low fort, so that they could not be seen. They fired some shot upon the frigates, the biggest guns they have being two nine-pounders, and wounded four or five of our men. There are about 20 men in the Bass, commanded by one Graham, and the sergeant that betrayed it.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    19th April, 1692.

Recommendation to the Treasury anent the Men-of-war that attacked the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council being acquainted by the Lord High Chancellor that the captain of the two men-of-war now lying in the road of Leith by warrant of the Queen's Majesty and the Commissioners of Admiralty in England and orders from his Lordship have made an attempt upon the island of the Bass, and have beat down or disabled the crane and shattered the few houses in that island, in which service they have consumed great quantity of powder and spent a great number of cannon ball, and these ships of war being to sail as convoys with some transport ships carrying forces from this kingdom to Flanders, necessary it is that they be supplied of powder and ball from the magazine in their Majesties' Castle of Edinburgh before they enter upon their voyage ; the said Lords of Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of their Majesties' Treasury to consider and make trial what quantity of powder and number of ball the said ships stand in need of and to report to the Council at their first diet of meeting on Thursday next, that their Lordships may give order for furnishing the same from the Castle of Edinburgh.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    21st April, 1692.

Recommendation to  the Treasury  anent  Two Men-of-war that attacked the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of their Majesties' Treasury to cause furnish the two men-of-war belonging to their Majesties, presently lying in the road of Leith and who lately made an attempt upon the Bass, with such quantities of powder and ball from their Majesties' magazine in the Castle of Edinburgh as their Lordships shall find convenient; and likewise to cause provide and furnish with men, arms, ammunition and other necessaries two long boats with a dogar[Or Doggar—a Dutch fishing vessel with two masts, main and mizzen, somewhat resembling a ketch.]ship for keeping in of the rebels in the Bass and securing against any attempts which might be made by them.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    21st July, 1692.

 

The Council called for Major Monro, whom Sir Thomas Livingstone had sent to inquire about a ship lying at the Bass or in the road, and he reported that by what he could know there was a French ship come to the Bass on Tuesday at 7 p.m. and went away on Wednesday at 8 a.m. after delivering some things in three great boats to the Bass ; also there was a ' doggar' lying before the Bass since last night at 7 o'clock.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    26th July, 1692.

 

The Lords recommend to the Treasury that payment be made to the eight seamen who sailed the Dutch ' doggar,' which was seized by a French privateer and carried to the Bass, and which is still detained there, of some competent allowance for their maintenance during their necessary abode here and for defraying the cost of their transport to Holland when occasion offers.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    28th July, 1692.

 

The Lords recommend to Sir Archibald Murray of Blackbarony, Sir Thomas Livingstone, com-mander-in-chief, and Sir William Lockhart, H.M. solicitor, to examine William Smith, master of a ketch, his wife and ship's boy, William Glaidstanes seaman, James Drumond passenger, Kenneth Urquhart, James Montgomery and David Cockburn, who have been seized upon suspicion of corresponding with the rebels in the Bass or with the French caper which landed some succours there, and to report to the Council.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    2nd August, 1692.

 

The Lords, for the security of vessels in the Firth against the rebels in the Bass and protection of the lights in the May, recommend Sir Thomas Livingstone to send twelve foot soldiers to be a garrison in the house on the said island, and furnish the same with provisions for quarter of a  year.    They  also  ordain--------------- Cunninghame of Barnes, the proprietor of the island, to remove his sheep which he has there, and not to place any sheep or other animals on the island until their further order.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    9th August, 1692.

 

The Lords ordain the magistrates of Edin­burgh, the bailie of the Canongate and keeper of their tolbooth, to liberate William Glaidstanes, seaman, James Drumond, Kenneth Urquhart, James Montgomery, David Cockburn and William Poll, ship's boy to William Smith, prisoner therein, all seized at Dunbar on suspicion of conversing or corresponding with a French caper lately within the Firth, as nothing can be made out against them.

They also ordain the release of Elizabeth Thomas, wife of the said William Smith.

 

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh,    11th October, 1692.

 

The Lords appoint Lord Raith, Treasurer Depute, Lords Cardross, Beilhaven, Fountainhall, and Enstruther, and Sir Thomas Livingstone, to consider what course is to be taken for blocking up the rebels that are in the Bass and prevent them doing injury by sea or land.

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    25th October, 1692.

Recommendation for discharging Two Long Boats at the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council con­sidering that the keeping up of the two long boats fitted out by the Treasury upon recommendation from their Lordships of the Council against the rebels in the Bass will be a useless expense and charge upon the government now in the winter season, do therefore hereby recommend to the Lord High Chancellor to discharge the said boats after the first day of November next.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    20th December, 1692.

Recommendation to the Treasury anent a Ship against the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of their Majesties' Treasury to cause prepare a ' doggar' or other convenient vessel and cause furnish the same sufficiently with men, guns and other necessary arms and provisions for securing v of all ships, barques or boats passing up and down the Firth from the rebels in the Bass, or other­wise to secure the trade of the place against the said rebels in such manner as they find most convenient.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    3rd January, 1693.

 

The Chancellor acquainted the Council that a vessel had been seized at Eyemouth which was destined for the Bass, and that in that vessel was a Scotsman, who made his escape the same night, and three Englishmen who escaped the following day ; also that . . . Kellie, bailie of Eyemouth, had been brought as a prisoner to the Canongate. The Council appoint Kellie to be imprisoned in the tolbooth of Edinburgh, and recommend to the Lord Justice Clerk and Sir John Maxwell of Pollock to examine him and other two persons, Michael Cockburn and  Ninian  Brown in  Coldstream, who are suspected to have had a hand in bringing the vessel to the Bass.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    7th February, 1693.

Recommendation to the Lord Chancellor to return the Council's thanks to the Magistrates of Dunbar for seizing Boats going to the Bass.

 

The Lord High Chancellor acquainted the Council that some persons are seized and by the magistrates of Dunbar sent in to this place for having furnished a boat full of coals to the rebels in the Bass, and that his Lordship has desired the Lord Advocate and Justice Clerk to examine the persons seized, and that this is the second time the magistrates of Dunbar have testified their care and affection to the government by seizing persons who had been with the rebels in the Bass: The Council recommend to the Lord High Chan­cellor to return the thanks of the Board to the magistrates of Dunbar for their good service.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    28th February, 1693.

Recommendation to send Men-of-war against Privateers.

 

The Council recommended to Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of their Majes­ties' forces within this kingdom for the time, to cause advertise the several men-of-war[English] lying in this Firth that the Council are informed there are two French privateers lying at the mouth of the Firth and a ship with provisions to be con­veyed into the Bass; and recommend to the said Sir Thomas to send the vessel fitted out for securing against the rebels in the Bass now lying at Leith to carry this advertisement to the men-of-war; and Sir Thomas before the rising of the Council reported that the vessel appointed to give advertisement to the men-of-war not being able to get out of the harbour of Leith he has sent another boat.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    20th March, 1693.

Committee anent a Ship for Security of Trade in the Firth.

 

The Council recommends to the Viscount Tarbat, Lord Advocate, and Sir Thomas Living­stone, to speak such merchants as they shall think fit, and know from them if for the security of trade on this Firth they will rig out a fit ship, and the government will furnish her with men, guns and other arms.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    13th April, 1693.

Order anent the Rebels of the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council, being informed  that  there  are  several persons gone into the Bass since the rebels therein were charged to deliver up the same for their Majesties' service and themselves to their Majesties' mercy, therefore the said Lords do hereby give order and warrant to a herald with his coat displayed and a trumpeter to go to the Bass, or as near as he can safely, and in their Majesties' names and authority command  and  authorise  the  persons  presently within the said island  to deliver up the island and themselves in  manner foresaid  within  the space of six days next after they are charged under the pains of high treason ; and appoint Sir James Ogilvie, their Majesties' solicitor, to dispatch the herald and trumpeter with famous[of good report] persons to be witnesses, and cause furnish a boat to them ; and in case they obey not, then to denounce them ; and thereafter that letters of intercommoning[Letters from the Scots Privy Council in the King's name charging the lieges not to reset, supply or intercommune  with the   persons  denounced, under pain  of being art and part in their crimes.] be directed against them as effeirs: And in the meantime the said Lords do hereby promise a reward of fifty pounds sterling to any person or persons who shall seize upon and deliver to any of their Majesties' judges, magistrates or officers of their Majesties' forces the persons of Lieutenant-Colonel Graham or Michael Midletoune, governor of the Bass, two of the rebels in the said island, and the sum of twenty pounds sterling to any person or persons who shall seize upon and deliver in manner foresaid any of the persons afternamed, rebels in the said island, viz.: James, John and William Midletoune, the governor's brothers, Duncan McQueen, Thomas Hepburne, John Turm [?Turine], Mr. [The Christian names are left blank in the MS.] Henrisen, John McLean,  Moune [PMorrein], the   surgeon,  an   Englishman,  Nicolsone, John Glaidstanes, Gavin Johnstoune, Lieutenant John Hacket, seaman, two Irish seamen and another Irish seaman, two hoy boys that belonged to the Earl of Leven, Colonel Graham's servant, three or four more servants and John Mandersone, Charles Maitland's servant, detained against his will; and appoint these presents be printed and published at the Market Cross of Edinburgh and other places needful.

 

Recommendation to the Treasury to furnish a Boat against the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of their Majesties' Treasury, to cause prepare and furnish out such a large boat or two, as was em­ployed last year, with men, ammunition and other necessary provisions for attending the frigate already employed to secure trading vessels passing up and down the Firth and keeping the rebels who are in the Bass that they may not correspond with other persons nor come forth of that island, and to continue the said boat or boats in that service until the month of October exclusive and longer as they shall see cause, the expense of preparing and furnishing the said boat or boats not exceeding the sum of ten pounds sterling per month.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    13th May, 1693.

 

Letters of intercommuning are issued against the rebels mentioned in the minute of 13th April, 1693, ordaining that no person reset[In Scots law—to harbour an outlaw or criminal]. or have intercourse with them in any way for their comfort or assistance at their peril.

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    26th May, 1693.

 

Sir William Baird[Eldest son of Sir John Baird, Lord Newbyth, was made a baronet in his own right during his  father's lifetime.  He succeeded in 1698 and died in 1737.] younger of Newbyth is personally thanked by the Council for securing two or three of the rebels who had come on shore from the Bass.

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh.    26th May, 1693.

Recommendation to Sir Thomas Livingstone to write anent Boats going and coming into the Bass.

 

Their Majesties' High Commissioner and Lords of Privy Council do hereby recommend to Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of their Majesties' forces within this kingdom, to write to the commanding officer of the guards at Castle-town that he enquire and take trial how it comes to pass that boats do come from and return to the island of the Bass without interruption not­withstanding of that guard and of the ' dogar ' appointed for keeping in the rebels in that island, and to examine the captain or commander of the said ' dogar ' and take trial of his deportment in keeping watch upon the said rebels ; and recom­mend to the said Sir Thomas Livingstone to report his diligence herein to the Council.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.     3rd June, 1693.

 

The Council recommend to the Lord Justice Clerk and Mr. Francis Montgomery of Giffin to examine, --------------- skipper of a vessel alleged going from Aberdour to the Bass, who is presently prisoner in Edinburgh tolbooth; and they approve of the Lord Advocate having seized and imprisoned him.

 

Ibidem (résumé)

Edinburgh.  20th June 1693

 

The Lords recommend to the Lords of Treasury to cause value the bark with belonged to William Robertson n Cookeine [Cockenzie] now lying in the harbour of Inverkeighing, and its cargo and whole furniture, and which was seized by William Wemyss of Kettelhill as a justice of the peace, as she was designing for the Bass, and cause the same to be rouped [Sold by auction] for payment to the said William Wemyss and those who assisted him (whose services they herby approve) of such sums as they may think these services merit.

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh.  6th February 1694

Remit to the Treasury for furnishing a Ship against the Bass

 

   The Lords of their Majesties’ Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commisoners of their Majesties’ Treasury to cause make sufficient provision for a speedy outrig of a ship of war, well manned and furnished with all instruments of war and other necessaries, able to make defence against any ship which may happen to come with provisions of men or other supply to the rebels in the Bass.  (Sic subscribitur),

   TWEEDDALE, Cancel

 

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh, 15th February 1694.

Warrant for outrigging a third Boat against the Bass.

 

The Lords [of] their Majesties’ Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commisioners of their Majesties’ Treasury to cause furnish, prepare and outrig another boat, besides the two already appointed for security of vessels passing up and down the Firth against the rebels in the Bass, until the ship of war which is formerly ordered by the Council be made ready and put to sea.    (Sic subscribitur),

TWEEDDALE, CANCEL.,

SOUTHERLAND,

LEVEN,

FORFAR, KLNTOR,

TARBAT,

ROSS,

WILL : MR. OF FORBES,

JA. STEUART,

JO. LAUDER,

F. MONTGOMERY.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh. 20th February, 1694.

Act: Mr. John Duncan to treat with the Rebels in the Bass.

 

Anent the petition given in to the Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council by Mr. John Dun­can, merchant in Edinburgh, shewing that whereas the petitioner had a barque coming from Dunbar laden with wheat which parted from that port Sunday last about five in the morning, and kept at least three or four miles to the north of the Bass, yet, there being little wind, the Bass men took their advantage and came out eighteen of them in their boat and made up to the barque, but though the barque took about and got back almost to Dunbar yet she was overtaken and seized within less nor a mile to that port, where­upon Baillie Kirkwood of Dunbar with all possible diligence rode to Castletown with all speed to acquaint the garrison and by the way saw two of Castletown's boats with their captain and lieutenant and twenty-two soldiers making towards them for the barque's relief, whereupon the Bass men towing the barque along quitted their own boat and went into the barque with all their arms, and the soldiers apprehending they might have two ' pateraroes '[Or ' pedereroes '—Spanish-made cannon used on men-of-war, and so called from the use of stones as the charge.] on board, thought not fit to attack them with so visible a hazard, whereby the petitioner's barque was lost, and also a most happy opportunity to have reduced the Bass, seeing their whole company save four men were on board and it was almost dark night before they got the length of the Bass; and therefore humbly craving their Lordships, in respect of the petitioner's loss, and if his bark be yet unstaved or whether staved or not, to allow him to go and parley with the Bass men for recovery of the said wheat and barque, to make the best bargain with them he can, as others in the like case have been allowed to do, as the said petition bears. The said Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council, having considered this petition given in to them by the above Mr. John Duncan, they hereby allow the petitioner to go and treat with the rebels in the Bass and to make the best bargain with them he can, the treating being always in presence of any officers of their Majesties' standing forces to be sent by Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of their Majesties' forces within this king­dom, to go along with the petitioner, providing always the petitioner shall treat only for money to be given for his said barque and loading, and shall make no bargain by bartering or change of commodities ; and declare that the above treaty shall infer no hazard against the persons allowed to treat, albeit the rebels in the Bass be intercommuned and declared rebels.

 

The London Gazette, No. 3953.

Edinburgh.    22nd February, 1694.

 

On Sunday last the rebels in the Bass perceiving a barque sailing by from Dunbar laden with corn for Leith, they manned out their boat with 18 of their number and seized the said barque, which the garrison at Castletown having notice, they sent off about 20 soldiers in boats, upon which those of the Bass quitted their own boat, and betook themselves to the laden barque, but a violent storm arising, they could not get back to the Bass and were forced out to sea and have not since "been heard of, so that there now remain but 7 or 8 men in the Bass.     This day John Trotter[Laird of Mortonhall, Midlothian. His brother Alexander was included amongst the Scots rebels in France who were proceeded against in July, 1695, for treason.—The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, vol. ix, App. p. 115.] and--------------- Marklif were found guilty by the Justice Court of furnishing provisions to and keeping correspondence with the rebels in the Bass, and were condemned as traitors.

 

Ibidem, No. 2954.

Edinburgh.    24th February, 1694.

 

By letters of yesterday from Dundee we are told that the vessel laden with corn which was lately seized by the rebels, who went off in their boat from the Bass, was by stress of weather forced into Dundee, and that the men who were in her got ashore in the night, of whom 3 were apprehended, and the rest were skulking in the country, though 'twas not doubted but they would be likewise taken.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland (résumé).

Edinburgh.    27th February, 1694.

 

The Lords grant warrant to the   Sheriff of Forfar to transport under a sufficient guard from Dundee Andrew Caddell, one of the rebels lately in the Bass and now prisoner in Dundee, to the sheriff of Fife, and he to the next sheriff and so from sheriff to sheriff until he be delivered to the magistrates  of Edinburgh,  to whom they give order to detain him in their tolbooth ;   and they also ordain the magistrates of Dundee to liberate Donald Ross, mariner at Leith, and James Reid, sailmaker  there,   two  seamen  who  were  lately seized by the rebels in the Bass and are now prisoners in the tolbooth of Dundee, on finding caution to live as loyal and peaceable subjects.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    28th February, 1694.

Act Discharging Boats, Barques, or Vessels from going to the Bass or furnishing supplies thereto printed.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council, being informed that several of the rebels who hold out the isle and rock of the Bass are at present come or driven ashore, and that by the late storms the boats belonging to the said rebels are lost, which may prove an effectual means of their reduction, do hereby strictly command and charge all persons, skippers, owners or possessors of boats, barques or other vessels great or small, residing and possessing the said boats, barques or vessels on either side of the Firth, from Stirling to St. Andrews on the one side, and from Stirling to Berwick on the other side of the said rock, that they carefully keep and secure the same both night and day from being either seized upon, stolen or otherwise taken away by the said rebels or any of them or any other person for their use and service, under all highest pains, and that neither they nor any person whatsoever présumé to hire, lend or otherwise furnish any boat, barque or other vessel to the said rebels or any of them or any other for their use and service under the pains due to corresponders with and suppliers of rebels and traitors : And further the said Lords do hereby renew and assure the promise of twenty pounds sterling, formerly made to any person who shall seize any of the said rebels wherever they may be found and shall deliver the person so seized to any of their Majesties' officers, either civil or military. And they ordain that these presents be printed and published at the Market Cross of Edinburgh and also at all the towns on the coast of either side of the Firth within the bounds foresaid that none pretend ignorance.

 

Commission :  Captain Edward Burd.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council considering that the isle and rock of the Bass and rebels therein, who have long held out in rebellion, may now be in some straits for want of provisions, and, as is informed, are in daily expectation to be succoured and relieved by some of the enemy's ships or vessels that may arrive thereat, as also that the rebels in the said island have of late had the boldness to seize a barque within the Firth; for which reasons the said Lords have thought good to outrig and fit out a frigate sufficiently provided with men, arms and ammunition, and in the absence of the Duke of Hamilton, Lord High Admiral, and in the present exigency to give  commission   to  the  person   afternamed  to command the said frigate for to watch the said Bass, and to hinder all manner of provisions and supplies to be brought or entered into it, and likewise to secure the ships and vessels belonging to his Majesty's lieges that may be in hazard from their attacks and surprises ;   and the said Lords having special trust and confidence in the loyalty, courage and conduct of Captain Edward [Burd], master of the good ship called the Lyon, have   therefore  nominated   and   appointed   and hereby nominate and appoint the said Captain Edward Burd to be captain of the said good ship or frigate called the Lyon,   of  the  burden  of two hundred tons or thereby and twenty pieces of ordnance, with all ammunition proportionable as a man-of-war commissioned in their Majesties' service, to the special effect underwritten allenarly, [A Scots legal term meaning only] ... to watch the foresaid island and fort of the Bass and for that end to cruise between St. Abb's Head and Fifeness, day and night with all care and diligence, and to seize all ships and vessels whatsoever great or small, bound or justly sus­pected to be bound for the said isle and fort of the Bass or to any other port within the Firth for the supplying and relieving thereof with any sort of provisions of men, victual, arms or ammuni­tion or others whatsoever, and, if need be, upon resistance  to fight,   destroy or otherwise  over­master the said ships or vessels as he shall see cause ;   as likewise to seize all ships,  boats or vessels whatsoever coming from the Bass, and, in case of resistance, to fight, destroy and otherwise overmaster  them  as  above;    and  generally  to watch and shut up the foresaid rock and island and  rebels  therein  with  all  possible  care  and strictness and use all manner of hostility against them for that effect, and to reduce them by all methods possible ; and ordain the said captain to secure and preserve harmless and skaithless all ships and vessels whatsoever with their goods and loading belonging to their Majesties' good subjects or allies from all attempts and violences either from the said rebels in the Bass or of any other their Majesties' enemies ; and also give full power and commission to the said captain to seize all ships and vessels belonging to enemies in property or having commission from them within the Firth or the bounds above designed for the said frigate's cruising and that, if need be, t>y fighting, destroying or otherwise overmastering the said enemies as he shall see cause, and to bring the ships or vessels so overmastered and apprehended to any port or harbour of this kingdom without breaking bulk or altering the property thereof to be proceeded against and judged according to law in the High Court of Admiralty of this kingdom or such other court or courts as by a particular and special warrant and commission shall be sufficiently authorised to do the same . . . Signed and sealed by the signet of Council at Edinburgh the twenty-eighth day of February, 1694 years.    {Sic subscribitur),

TWEEDDALE, CANCEL.,

SOUTHERLAND,

CASSILLIS,

LLNLITHGOW, FORFAR,

RAITH, ROSS,

JA. STEUART,

FRA. MONTGOMERY,

THO. LIVINGSTONE. [SIGNET AFFIXED.]

The London Gazette, No. 2955.

Edinburgh,    1st March, 1694.

 

. . . The three persons who were taken some time ago, as they came from the Bass, being brought to their trial upon an indictment of high treason, and found guilty of the same, had sentence accordingly pronounced against them yesterday by the Lords of the Justiciary, which was afterwards published by the heralds with sound of trumpet at the Mercat[Market] Cross, and their execution is appointed to be on the 6th of the next month.

 

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland (résumé).

Edinburgh.    13th March, 1694.

 

On a petition by Alexander McLeish, who was convicted by the Lords of Justiciary for treason and condemned to be executed on 28th March instant, for having hired a boat at Dunbar to carry two men to the Bass and sending in a letter and receiving an answer from the Bass, the Lords reprieve the petitioner till 6th April. He repre­sents that being a poor, simple fisher he ' was miserably trepanned by Charles Maitland, who induced him to hyre the boat by telling him [he had] a warrant for it, and that he was only sending in these two men to get out his luggage which he left behind him and that of the contents of the letter he has no knowledge.

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    14th March, 1694.

Recommendation to Sir Thomas Livingstone to visit the Island of the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of their Majesties' forces within this kingdom, with all possible diligence to visit the rock or isle of the Bass, as exactly and narrowly as he can, and to take all informa­tion he can find anent the situation and fortification thereof both without and within, and anent the several landing-places thereof, and to make such attempts and attacks upon the said island and against the rebels therein as he shall think fit.

 

Recommendation to the Lord Chancellor to give Warrants to the Relations Sentenced upon Account of the Bass to go into the Isle of the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lord High Chancellor to give warrants to the wives, children or other relations of the persons presently under sentence of death for corresponding with the rebels in the Bass to go into the said rebels and intimate the dangerous case of the sentenced persons and deal with the said rebels what proposals they will or can make in writing under their hands anent the persons sentenced, as said is, and to report the proposals which shall be made to the Council that they may consider if they will grant any favour to the sentenced persons or any of them by reprieve or otherwise when they have heard the proposals.

 

Ibidem (résumé).

Edinburgh.    19th March, 1694.

 

The Lords ordain that John Trotter, prisoner in the tolbooth of Edinburgh under sentence of execution at the Cross of Edinburgh on 28 March instant, be taken to the town of Castletown by a strong guard of horse and hanged there upon a gallows at a spot where he can be best seen by the rebels in the Bass by the sheriff of Haddington. Sir Thomas Livingstone is appointed to transport the prisoner and not to do so until the day of execution.

The Lords ordain the Lord Advocate to raise an action for treason against Andrew Caddell, presently a prisoner, for corresponding with the rebels in the Bass.

 

Edinburgh.    20th March, 1694.

Act for treating with the Rebels in the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council, considering that James Midletoune, prisoner in the tolbooth of Edinburgh, sentenced to death by the Lords Commissioners of Justiciary for treason­able joining and corresponding with the rebels in the Bass, and having heard a letter from the said James to the Lord Chancellor humbly craving allowance to the effect  he may deal with  his brother, the pretended governor of the Bass, to surrender and deliver up that fort to the govern­ment, the said Lords recommend to Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief of their Majesties' forces within this kingdom, to transport under a sufficient guard the said James Midletoune from the tolbooth of Edinburgh to Castletown, over against the Bass, whom the magistrates of Edin­burgh are hereby ordered to deliver to that effect, and there that the said Sir Thomas cause a parley to be offered with the rebels in the Bass, and that if the same be accepted by them the said Sir Thomas, or the officer to whom he shall trust the execution  of these presents,  shall  demand the persons of Midletoune, brother to the said James, and any other sufficient man of the said rebels to be delivered at Castletown to the said officer as hostages  for  the said James  Midletoune ;   and upon  receiving the  said hostages the  said  Sir Thomas Livingstone or officer foresaid instructed by him are to permit and allow and if need be to give a pass to the said James Midletoune to sail over to the said isle of the Bass and enter within the garrison thereof, and make his abode and stay there for the space of twelve hours, wind  and weather serving, and to deal and use his utmost endeavours with his brother and garrison in the Bass for surrendering and delivering up the same to the said Sir Thomas Livingstone  or Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council within the space of four and twenty hours after his landing at the Bass, upon such terms as the said Sir Thomas or  the  officer  foresaid instructed by him  shall agree to,   and with  special power to the  said James Midletoune to certify and give assurance to his said brother and garrison foresaid that upon surrender foresaid not only the said James Midletoune but likewise the whole other persons condemned to die upon account of the Bass, viz. Halyburtone, Frazer, John Trotter,[John Trotter was hanged at Castletown on  28th March, 1694.] Alexander McLeish, William Notham and William Nicolsone with the said James Midletoune, shall be freely and fully pardoned and set at liberty to stay or go out of this kingdom at their pleasure ; with certification that, in case the said James Midletoune shall not duly return from the Bass and deliver himself again at Castletown to the said Sir Thomas Livingstone or officer instructed by him, then the hostages delivered to and in keeping of the said officer shall be presently executed to death by being hanged upon the gibbet at Castle-town till they be dead, conform to the martial law in such cases. But in case either the said parley shall not be accepted, or that the said James Midletoune shall return and deliver himself prisoner at Castletown without effectuating the surrender of the Bass, then the said Sir Thomas Livingstone or officer instructed by him are to return and bring back the said James Midletoune under a sufficient guard and deliver him prisoner to the tolbooth of Edinburgh, where the magistrates and keeper of their tolbooth are to receive him and detain him in safe custody till the sentence of death pronounced against him be duly exe­cuted ; for the due and punctual execution of all which these presents shall be to the said Sir Thomas Livingstone and officer foresaid instructed by him, and all others concerned, a sufficient command and warrant; as also appoint the clerks of Council to give out extracts hereof to the said James Midletoune or any concerned in the premises in order to the foresaid treaty for their full assurance thereanent. Sic subscribitur as in the sederunt.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    30th March, 1694.

Recommendation to the Treasury to furnish another Ship against the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of their Majesties' Treasury to cause make sufficient provision for the speedy outrig of another ship of war, beside that already fitted out and commanded by Captain Edward Burd, well manned, furnished with all instruments of war and other necessaries, able to make defence against any ship which may happen to come with provisions of men or other supply to the rebels in the Bass.

 

Commission : Captain Bosswell against the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council, [on the same narrative as in Captain Burd's com­mission] 1 considering that the said Lords have already given commission to Captain Edward Burd, captain of the good ship or frigate called the Lyon, to sail with his said ship and watch the said isle and seize all ships bound thereto, as the said commission, which is of the like tenor with this present commission, at more length bears ; and the said Lords, finding it necessary in respect of attempts made by French privateers for relieving the rebels in the said island that another ship of force be outrigged for blocking up the said Bass and preventing any relief or supply to be sent in or furnished to the said rebels from the king­dom of France or other enemies to their Majesties and their government, they have thought good to outrig and fit out another frigate sufficiently provided with men, arms and ammunition, and in the absence of the Duke of Hamilton, Lord High Admiral, and in the present exigency to give commission to the person afternamed to command the said frigate for to watch the said Bass and to hinder all manner of provisions and supplies to be brought or entered into it, and likewise to secure the ships and vessels belonging to his Majesty's lieges that may be in hazard from their attacks and surprises : And the said Lords having special trust and confidence in the loyalty, courage and conduct of John Bosswell, skipper in Kirkcaldie, master of the good ship called the Providence, have therefore nominated and appointed and hereby nominate and appoint the said John Bosswell to be captain of the good ship or frigate called the Providence, of the burden of 200 tons or thereby and 20 pieces of ordnance, with all ammunition proportionable as a man-of-war commissioned in their Majesties' service to the special effect underwritten allenarly ... to watch the foresaid isle and fort of the Bass and for that end to cruise between St. Abb's Head and Fifeness, &c. [all as narrated in Captain Burd's commission].

 

Recommendation  to  the  Treasury for  a Fire-ship against the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of their Majesties' Treasury with all diligence to cause outrig and put out a fire-ship for assisting the ships of war already ordered against the Bass and for attacking, burning and destroying any such ships or vessels, one or more, as shall attempt to get in to the said isle of the Bass or to furnish or supply the rebels therein any manner of way, and to agree with such persons for commanding or serving in the said fire-ship as they shall think fit for that service, and that upon such terms and for such hire or wages as they shall think reasonable, and to cause pay them accordingly.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    5th April, 1694.

Letter from the Council to the King anent Ships put out against the Bass.

 

May it please your Majesty,—We had good information weeks ago that the garrison of the Bass was in great straits, and they having at that time made some attempts with their long boat upon some small vessels passing and re-passing in the Firth, we thought fit to give an order and commission for providing and outrigging a frigate [The Lyon.] of twenty-four guns to cruise upon them and hinder both their supplies and excursions. And immediately after the frigate was set out there came a privateer[ Memoirs of the Rev. J. Blackader, &c, p. 386.] to have supplied the Bass but was repulsed and forced back to sea, having only had the time to land a few men upon the rock, which must prove rather a further straitening than relief to the place ; but having good reason to apprehend that the beating back of this privateer may occasion the sending of a greater force we thought it necessary to order out another frigate [The Providence.] of twenty guns with a fire-ship, that we may neither expose our first ship to so visible a hazard nor lose so probable an advantage. These things we have done in the easiest manner we could, and have recommended the defraying of the charge to the Lords of your Majesty's Treasury, whose concurrence we also had in this matter. And now in all humble duty we do lay these our proceedings before your Majesty   to   have   your   approbation,  &c.   (Sicsubscribitur),

TWEEDDALE, CANCEL.,

MELVILL,

SOUTHERLAND,

CASSILLIS,

LEVEN,

ANNANDALE,

FORFAR,

BEILHAVEN, JA. STEUART.

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    16th April, 1694.

Commission: Captain Adams against the Bass.

The Lords [narrating that they have already commissioned two ships], . . . and seeing it may be useful and necessary, both for defence of the ships outrigged and for preventing any relief which may come to the said rebels from any of their Majesties' enemies, that a fire-ship be rigged out and put to sea, they have thought good to outrig such a ship . . .: having special confidence and trust in the loyalty, courage and good conduct of--------------- Adams, lieutenant to the Artillery Company, have therefore nominated and appointed and hereby nominate and appoint the said Lieutenant Adams to be captain of the ship called the                      , with all ammunition and materials proportionable, as a fire-ship, commis­sioned in their Majesties' service, to the special effect underwritten allenarly, [as in the two pre­vious commissions to Captains Burd and Bosswell].

 

From MS. Document [The spelling of the MS. is adhered to.] in Register House, Edinburgh.

A list of the men aboard of the Lyon, Captain Edward Burd, commander, both officers and seamen, taken up the Sixteen day of April, jm vjc and ninety-four years, by Robert Faa, present baillie of Dumbar, conform to ane act of the Lords of ther Majesties' Thesaurarie dated the fifth day of April instant.

 

1.          Lieutenant, Ninian Hendersone.

2.          Lieutenant, James Carron.

3.          Master, James Cuthbertsone.

4.          Mate, James Pinkerton.

5.          Doctor, George Maccallo.

6.          Bosson, George Pedden.

7.          Gunner, James Aitchisone.

8.          Carpenter, James Douglass.

9.          Coock, Robert Hay.

10.         Midshipman and Coockson, John Auchterlony.

11.         Midshipman, James Littlejohn.

12.         Qwarteer, William Main.

13.         Qwarteer, David Drysdaill.

14.         Qwarteer, William Blaikie.

15.         Qwarteer, Allexander Hendersone.

16.         Bosson's mate, John Boustoun.

17.         Gunner's mate, James Coutrie.

18.         Carpenter's mate, William Douglass.

19.         Cook's mate, James Davidsone.

20.         Couper and Stewart, John Aitkin.

21.         Couper's mate, Andrew Broun.

 

 

Foirmastmen

 

 

22. 

William Byter. 

24.      

John Miller.

23.

Robert Irvin. 

25.      

James Bell.

26

James Black.

36.      

James Symonton.

27.

George Beell. 

37.      

Thomas Andersone, younger.

28.

William Strang.

38.      

John Robertsone.

29.

 John Ross. 

39.      

James Robertsone.

30

Charles Gowans. 

40.      

George Mill.

31.

William Grahame.

41.      

John Low.

32. 

Thomas Andersone.

42.      

Mark Pedden.

33.

William Mathisone.

43.      

Thomas Whyt.

34.

John Fairbairne.

44.      

William Thomsone.

35.

George Liddell.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boyes.

 

 

 

John Cuthbertsone.

 

Robert Mitchell.

 

John Legget.

 

James Maccallo.

 

 

 

 

 

On board of Captain Burd's ship the 16 of April, 1694, mustered then be me Baily Robert Faae fourtie-four men efective with foure boyes, witnes my hand dait forsaid.

(Signed) ROBERT FAA,

E. BURD.

 

 

A list of the souldeirs aboard the Lyon, commanded by Captain Edward Burd, the 16 Aprill, 1694.

 

Levtennent

 Corporals.

George Winrame

 John Gourli.   

 

James Hutchison.

Sergeants.

 

Allexander McWatti.

Drumer.

Casper Frans.

William Hartt.

 

 

Colonel's Company.

Captain Dumbar's Company.

John Stuwartt.

William Coutts.

Abram Woodman.

John Grube.

 

John Castells.

Levtenent-Colonel's Company.

 

Robert Willson

Captain Hamillton's Company.

John Ward

Huwgh Grantt.

John Cummin.

John Ogillvie.

David McCleur.

James Moor.

 

William Salmond.

Major's Company.

 

Andrew Maine.

Captain Baillis' Company.

Wallter Stuwart.

Adam Carre.

John Jamison.

John Vepper.

 

Andrew Pitthie.

Captain Reid's Company.

 

Robert Marnei.                                 

Captain Weir's Company.

John Bell.      

James Waston.

 

James Gray..

Captain Dalem's Company.

Hewgh Tennoch

John Smitth.

 

Patrick Thorinton.

Captain Stuwart's Company.

James Pattierove.

Samuell McMillen.

Allexander Shillds

Hendry Gillcrist.

 

James Aittkin.

Captain   Orok's Company.

 

James Watt

Captain Johnston's Company.

John Bell.     

Hendry McGee.

Thomas Glen.

William Gormell.

Allexander Shepherd.

James Scrogi.

 

Aboard of Captain Bird's ship the sixtein day of Aprile, jm vjc and nyntie-four years, mustered of officers and souldiers fourtie-four landmen be me Robert Faa, baillie of Dumbar, witness my hand day and place forsaid.

(Signed) ROBERT FAA,

GEORGE WINRAME.

 

 

Ane list of the Comanders and Seamen aboard of the Providence quherof Captain John Bosuall is Comander, taken up be Baillie Robert Faa in Dumbar conform to his commissione be the Commissioners and Lords of Thesaurarie, upon the sixtein day of April jm vf and nyntie-four years.

 

Levtennent.

Mate.   

Gunner.     

David Young.

David Balfouer.

George Rellick.

 

 

 

Bossan.

Carpenter   

Doctor.

David Gray.      

James Robertsone.

William Abercrombie.

 

 

 

Foirmastmen.

 

 

James Allexander 

James Bruce.

 

Robert Forrestdaill

William Stocks

David Miller.

James Kilgour     

Henry Stevensone.

James Bavard.

Henry Andersone

Andrew Gourlay

Henry Lindsay.

James Whyt  

John Bavverage.

James Johnston

James Gedd   

Patrick Murray. .

Andrew Kay.

James Kaidzie   

David Drysdaill.

Samuell Halyday.

Steven Philp

John Boswall.

John Forbess

David Wald   

Charles Smith.

Allexander Aitkin.

Thomas Playfair  

Robert Richie.

Francis Hendersone

John Carnagy  

William Orack.

William Ending.

Robert Crystie

John Archbald.

David Bennaty.

John Kaidzie.

James Law.

James Dick.

John Robertsone.

James Allexander,

 

 

 

 

Boyes.

 

 

Mathew Dick.

William Law.

John Archbald.

 

Aboard of the forsaid ship the day forsaid, mustered be me Baillie Robert Faa, the number of fourtie-six men, of officers and other seamen, besyde the captain himself and the saids three boyes.

(Signed) ROBERT FAA,

JOHN BOISUALL.

 

 

A list of the officers and land soldiers aboard of theProvidence,  Captain John Bosuall comander,taken up and mustered be Baillie Robert Faa in Dumbar the sixtein day of April, jm vf and nyntie-four years.

 

Levtenant

William Avass.

John Dupont

John Mill.

 

John Whyt.

Serjants

Ferguss Mackenno.

James Dickson.

William Grahame.

James Bilson.

Andrew Davidsone.

 

John Mack Robert.

Corporals.

James Scot.

William Scot.

John Campbell.

Patrick Wilsone.

David Borthwick.

 

Gilbert Richie.

Sentinals.

James Prymor.

William Forbess.

Thomas Barcla.

Allexander Robertsone.

George Buchannan.

John Dean.

John Glenny.

James Gary.

Robert Reed.

John Lindsay.

James Pyper.

James Porteous.

John Humphy.

James Wright.

Allexander Strachan.

Andrew Law.

John Baity.

George Mackdonald.

John Floyde.

Peter Wilson.

George Robisone.

Andrew Witherinton.

William Mackfarlane.

Mathew Whyt.

John Murray.

William Bevverly.

John Croose.

Allexander Smith, elder.

William Barty.

Allexander Smith, younger.

Robert Hardy.

Allexander Merston.

George Roos.

Henry Cumming.

John Nicoll.

 

Thomas Davison, drumer

 

Aboard of the Providence, the said Captain Bosuall comander, the forsaid sixtein of Aprile, 1694, mustered aboard conform to the abov-written roll off officers and souldiers, fiftie-two, be me

(Signed) Robert Faa,
John Dupont,
Lt.
 

 

 

Minutes of the Council of Scotland (résumé)

Edinburgh.    16th April, 1694.

 

The Lords approve the Chancellor's instruc­tions to Sir Thomas Livingstone to remove from the island of the May the sheep or cows pasturing thereon, and to remove the garrison there, as the rebels in the Bass have frequently supplied themselves from the May with cattle, and they prohibit--------------- Cuningham of Barns from placing cattle or sheep thereupon, he being proprietor of the May, so long as the Bass is held by the rebels, on pain of being dealt with as a correspondent with them, and require him to give caution for his obedience.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    18th April, 1694.

Commission : Major Reid to Treat with the Rebels in the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council, having seen and considered the letters and pro­posals sent from the Bass to the Lord Chancellor, do hereby authorise and empower Major Robert Reid to treat with the garrison there and their governor anent the surrender of the Bass upon what terms and conditions and in what manner ; as also to do all other things for the carrying on and securing the said treaty and for the conclud­ing and making the same effectual, as they shall see cause ; and the Lords of Council do hereby promise to hold firm and stable all and whatsoever things their said Commissioners shall do in the premises; and this commission to endure till the twenty-fifth  day of  April instant inclusive and no longer.

(Sic subscribiter) TWEEDDALE, CANCEL.,

SOUTHERLAND,

ANNANDALE,

FORFAR,

TARBAT,

ROSS,

BEILHAVEN,

CARMICHAELL,

POLWORTH,

JA. STEUART,

A.D. COCKBURN,

ENSTRUTHER,

FRANCES MONTGOMERY,

LUDOVICK GRANT.

Eodem die, post meridiem.

Sederunt ut ante meridiem, except that the Lord Beilhaven was absent and the Lord Strathnaver present.

 

 

Articles[See the Scots Magazine of March 1781, pp. 118-119.] and Instructions for Major Robert Reid and . . . according to which and no otherwise they are to treat with Michaell Midletoune and the other rebels in the Bass for surrendering and delivering up thereof, notwithstanding of the commission granted to them in general terms by the Privy Council for treating with the said rebels.

 

Primo, that there be an ample act of freedom and indemnity to the said Michaell Midletoune and to all the other persons presently in the said island of the Bass under his command for their lives, liberties and fortunes, and of all past and done by them or any of them against this present govern­ment or to the prejudice of any particular person by sea or land since their seizing and holding out of the said island of the Bass for the defence or supply thereof, for nothing of all which they shall be questioned by any person or persons at any time hereafter ; Secundo, that such persons to be set down in list who are imprisoned upon account of the Bass, whether sentenced to death or not, with all others who have been in the said garrison and have left it since the first day of January 1693, shall be indemnified, freed and set at liberty ; with this declaration that no person whatsoever shall be for hereafter questioned or molested for having corresponded with or supplied the said garrison in any time past; Tertio, that the said Michaell Midletoune with the other persons in the said garrison under his command shall march out of the said island within twenty-four hours after signing the said capitulation with their swords only, and that boats shall be furnished to them for their safe transport to the shore at Castletown ; Quarto, the said Michaell Midletoune and whole other persons within the said island are within twelve hours after the signing the said capitulation to deliver up to your possession the said island of the Bass with the cannon, whole arms and ammu­nition, stores, boats and others belonging to the said island or within the same, except the swords worn by the said persons themselves when they come out, and the goods after specified ; Quinto, that the said Michaell Midletoune shall condescend under his hand upon the names"and designations of the said persons comprehended in this capitula­tion who are to depart out of this kingdom for France between and the fixed day aftermentioned, wind and weather serving, who shall have passes granted to them accordingly for their safe transport between and the said day ;   and likewise shall condescend under his hand upon the names and designations of the persons foresaid, who are to remain within this kingdom, that protection may accordingly be given to them upon their granting bond, obliging themselves to live peaceably with all   submission   in   the   ordinary   form;    Sexto, the said Michaell Midletoune and other persons in the Bass shall be allowed the space of eight days' time after signing the capitulation for trans­porting out of the Bass the masts, nets, anchors, cables, salt and other goods belonging to them­ selves and not made use of for the crane or boats presently employed at the Bass, and they shall be  allowed  a  barque  or  convenient  boats  for transporting   the   said   goods   without   stop   or hindrance, and shall be allowed to dispose of them for their own advantage ; Septimo, Captain Ferdinando's men, not exceeding the number of ten, are  to  be  allowed  a   competent  aliment  until their going out of the kingdom which is to be between and the -------------------day of wind and weather serving, which is to be the fixed day both for them and those mentioned in the fifth article ; and a sufficient ship with provisions shall be ordered for their transport to Dunkirk or Havre de Grace gratis ; Octavo, upon the offer of this capitulation (if accepted) hostages be presently delivered for performance and the capitulation signed, conform to the commission of Council, that possession of the Bass be taken by you and the persons therein be carried ashore as above, and that they repair to Edinburgh with all conveniency there to remain till protection be given to such as are to remain within the country, and a ship be made ready for transporting them who are to go to France and passes granted to them for that effect; Nono, that the list mentioned in the second article be transmitted to my Lord Chan­cellor and agreed to by his Lordship before it be accorded to or the treaty concluded.

(SIC SUBSCRIBITUR) TWEEDDALE, CANCEL.,

SOUTHERLAND,

ANNANDALE,

FORFAR,

TARBAT,

STRATHNAVER,

ROSS,

CARMICHAELL,

P0LW0RTH,

JA. STEUART,

AD. COCKBURNE,

FRANCES MONTGOMERY,

T. LIVINGSTONE,

JOHN HALL.

 

 

Committee for Considering the List of Persons in the Second Article of Instructions anent the Surrender of the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby nominate and appoint the Lord Chancellor, the Earls of Southerland and Annandale, the Lord Advocate, the Lord Justice Clerk and Sir Thomas Livingstone, or any three of them, to be a committee to consider the list of the persons mentioned in the second article of the instructions given to Major Reid and ... for treating with the rebels in the Bass anent the surrendering thereof, and to give their return thereon to the said Major and . . . that they may proceed accordingly ; and the said Lords declare that the Lord Chancellor is to be one of the above three.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    20th April, 1694.

Anent the Bass for the surrendering thereof.

 

A letter from Major Reid to Sir Thomas Living­stone anent what had passed between him and Michaell Midletoune, governor of the Bass, and the rebels therein, in treating the surrender of the place, with the articles enclosed in the said letter read, and the articles being amended were transcribed and signed by a quorum of Council; and a list of persons imprisoned or under bail upon account of the Bass being also written, was signed by the Lord Chancellor, and both ordered to be given to Sir Thomas Livingstone by him to be sent forward to Major Reid. Follows the tenor of the articles signed by a quorum of Privy Council:—

 

Articles of Agreement for delivering the Bass.

Primo, that there be an indemnity to Michaell Midletoune, governor of the Bass, and to all other persons under his command therein, or who have been of the said garrison and have left it since January, 1693, for their lives, liberties and for­tunes for all what is past and done against this present government or whatsoever prejudice is or has been done to any other particular persons either here in this place or any other place by sea or land ; and that none hereafter shall call them to account or have liberty to question them or any of them for what they have done hitherto or any account whatsoever ; Secundo, that all the persons contained in the list herewith sent, imprisoned upon account of the Bass, whether sentenced to death or not, shall be indemnified, freed and set at liberty upon delivery of the said Bass, and no person whatsoever shall for hereafter be questioned or molested for having corre­spondence with, supplied or assisted the said garrison in any time past; Tertio, that the foresaid garrison shall have liberty to march out with their swords and their baggage in their own boat to land any place where they please as con­venience may serve, and dispose of the said boat at their pleasure afterward ; Quarto, that every person in the Bass shall have liberty to go for France together with such of them as are in prison or out of prison belonging to the Bass, and that they shall depart between and the fifteenth day of May next; and a sufficient ship with provisions shall be ordered between and the day foresaid to transport them to Dunkirk or Havre de Grace, and that those who are not willing to go for France may have protections to stay in these kingdoms : Quinto, that boats shall be sent before surrender for transporting the nets, masts, cables and all other goods belonging to the said garrison themselves and not belonging to the Bass formerly, and that they shall not be stopped in selling and disposing the said goods to their own advantage ; Sexto, the aliment granted by the government to Michaell Midletoune, Dunbar, Halyburtone and Roy at their imprisonment in the Bass and unpaid when the Bass was surprised is already ordered by the Council to be paid to their country creditor and shall be performed ; Septimo, there shall be an aliment allowed to ... Captain Fer-dinando's seamen, not exceeding ten, until the ships be ready for transporting them for France between and the day foresaid; and that the articles signed and subscribed by the Lord High Chancellor and other Lords of Council and Sir Thomas Livingstone, commander-in-chief, etc., at Edinburgh the twentieth day of April, 1694 years, shall be delivered to the said Michaell Midletoune for his and the other persons com­prehended therein their security ; Octavo, that the said Michaell Midletoune and whole other persons within the said island are within twelve hours after the signing these articles of capitu­lation to deliver up to your possession the said island of the Bass with the cannon, whole arms and ammunition and others belonging to the said island or within the same, except the swords worn by the said persons themselves when they come out and the goods before mentioned belonging properly to themselves.

(Sic subscribitur) TWEEDDALE, CANCEL.,

SOUTHERLAND,

LLNLITHGOW,

ANNANDALE,

FORFAR,

TARBAT, ROSS,

BEILHAVEN,

CARMICHAELL,

POLWARTH,

JA. STEUART,

AD. COCKBURN,

ENSTRUTHER.

 

 

            A List of Persons who are to have the benefit of the Capitulation with those in the Bass, conform to the Third Article thereof, and that besides the General Article of Indemnity to all who have assisted or supplied the same.

 

Frazer,-----Halyburtone, James Hay, William Glaidstanes, Andrew Caddell, James Midletoune, William Witham, William Nicolsone, Gavin John-stoun,    William    Robertsone     and    Alexander McGleish, all presently in prison,--------------- Dunbar, ------- Blackiter, James Wilsone, George Hog in Wintoune,--------------- Douglas, vintner,--------------- Emeltoun in Dunbar, not in prison but under bail.

 

The London Gazette, No. 2970.

Edinburgh.    22nd April, 1694.

 

The Bass was surrendered yesterday in the evening upon articles, by which those that were in it are indemnified, and such as were under sentence of death for holding correspondence with them pardoned. There came out of the Bass sixteen men with their baggage and swords, and at the same time Major Reid with a party of men took possession of it by order of the Privy Council.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    24th April, 1694.

Warrant to Hire a Ship for Transporting the Rebels that were in the Bass.

 

The Lords of their Majesties' Privy Council do hereby appoint George Baillie of Jerviswood, general receiver of their Majesties' crown rents, to make search and try out for and conduce a sufficient well-conditioned ship, well furnished and provided with all necessaries, for transporting to Havre de Grace in France the persons lately come out of the Bass at the time of its surrender and others who have corresponded with them ; and for that effect to conduce and agree with a skipper and seamen for sailing the said ship at as easy and reasonable a rate as he can, and to condescend upon a fixed day for the ship's sailing between and the fifteenth day of May next, and to make report of his diligence in the afternoon to the committee of Council appointed in this affair.

 

Seafleld Correspondence (Scottish History Society), p. 141.

Edinburgh.    27th April, 1694.

 

Robert Dunbar [Was one of several Scots rebels in France against whom a process of treason was raised in 1695.  See The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, vol. ix, App. p. 115.] and two privateers with him came up to the Bass on Sabbath last to have put in provisions for them, but finding it was surren­dered, and that four men-of-war lay here in the road, and Burd and Boswell hard by, they have gone off, but we fear skaith [Damage.] by them ere they return.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland (résumé).

Edinburgh.    1st May, 1694.

 

The Lords order intimation to be made by a macer to Michael Middletoun, sometime governor of the Bass, that he and all those with him who are to be transported to France be ready by 15th May, the day appointed for that voyage in the capitulation. The Lords recommend to the Lord Advocate to call for------Osburn, skipper, who was taken in the ship lately seized with wheat before the Bass, and carried to France, but who has since returned, and examine him as to the facts of the incident and the privateer which seized him.

 

Edinburgh.    2nd May, 1694.

 

The Lords ordain their macers to carry- Osburn, skipper in Dunbar, prisoner to the tolbooth of Edinburgh, there to remain till further order, and they meanwhile ordain Osburn to produce------------- Johnstoune, his servant, for examina­tion by them.

The Lords appoint the bond granted by Ensign David Dunbar, as one of the persons comprehended in the capitulation of the Bass, for his peaceable behaviour, dated 12th and 15th August, 1692, to be given up. His cautioner was Captain Archibald Dunbar in Col. Buchan's regiment.

 

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    10th May, 1694.

Letter from the King for Demolishing the Bass.

 

The following letter from the King's Majesty to the Council being read was ordered to be re­corded, whereof the tenor follows :—

[Sic suprascribitur) WILLIAM R.,—Right trusty and right well beloved cousin and councillor, etc., we greet you well. We approve of the articles of capitulation agreed on with those that held out the Bass. . . . We do likewise require you to give orders[There follows an Act of Council authorising  Sir Thomas Livingstone to do what is directed in this letter.] to Major-General Livingstone, the commander-in-chief of our forces, to make demolish all works, fortifications and other buildings whatsoever upon the Bass, and to remove thence the cannon, ammunition and whatever else may be serviceable elsewhere; and so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at Kensington, the 30 day of April, 1694, and of our reign the sixth year, 1694. By his Majesty's command.

(Sic subscribitur) J. JOHNSTOUN.


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