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The Old Scots Navy from 1689 to 1710
The Reign of Queen Anne to the Union of the Parliaments of England and Scotland, 1702 - 1707


THE REIGN OF QUEEN ANNE to the UNION OF THE PARLIAMENTS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND:  1702-1707.

 

INTRODUCTION

The Partition treaties of 1698 and 1700 regulating the succession to the Spanish throne were successively super­seded by the deaths of Ferdinand of Bavaria and Charles, King of Spain. The latter, in despite of the treaty terms, bequeathed the crown of Spain to Philip of Anjou, second son of the Dauphin of France, who to the aggrandisement of France succeeded in October, 1700. Next year the Grand Alliance was formed against him and his grand­father, Louis XIV, by the Emperor, the Estates of Holland and William III, and the war of the Spanish succession began. On 8th March, 1702, William died, but his foreign policy was taken up and prosecuted with vigour by his successor, Queen Anne. During the war, which lasted until 1709, great success was attained in the field on the continent of Europe by the English under Marlborough at Blenheim, Ramillies, Oudenarde, and Malplacquet; while Admirals Sir George Rooke, Sir Cloudesley Shovell, Sir John Leake, and Benbow, at Vigo Bay, Gibraltar, in the Mediterranean, in the West Indies, and in other places established the preponderance of England at sea. In the course of the war, while Scots regiments per­formed great and important service, the small Scots navy of three frigates, inherited by the Queen from her pre­decessor, could do no more than routine local, though useful,  service in protecting from French and Ostend privateers Scots shipping on the east and west coasts of Scotland.    On 25th August, 1702, the two smaller frigates, the Royal Mary and the Dumbarton Castle, were ordered to be ' outreiked ' to protect the coasts of Scotland, and orders were given that the defects of the third and largest frigate, the Royal William, should be remedied, the poll tax and the more usual cess or land tax being voted to defray the outlay on the frigates.    Whether the Royal Mary and the Dumbarton Castle were commissioned that season is not altogether clear.    It is certain that early in March, 1703, the Scots government invited the English Admiralty to protect Scots shipping in Scottish waters. A curious commentary on this request for extraneous assistance is the fact that a few days earlier, on 27th February, the Royal William, then lying idle in Burnt-island harbour, was according to usual custom lent out to Captain Thomas Gordon of Aberdeen and two partners for a trading voyage to the East Indies.    Parsimony of this  kind while  French  and  Flemish  privateers  were infesting the  coasts  of Scotland and  damaging Scots merchant shipping could not endure, though it was not easily stopped.    Early in July, 1703, the Royal Mary and the Dumbarton Castle were certainly rigged out  and manned; and on the 16th of that month Thomas Gordon of  Aberdeen  and   Mathew   Campbell,  their respective captains,    along   with   other   officers,   received   their commissions.      A    sidelight     is    thrown    upon    the methods  of manning these  frigates  in  the  complaint to the Privy Council by,John   Spence,  captain  of a Leith merchantman, that Captain Gordon had pressed his  crew into  the  Royal  service.    The  Privy Council disbelieved the complaint, and Spence felt the matter so strongly that next year he refused to salute the Scottish flag flying on the Royal Mary, and was on 2nd May, 1704, dealt with by the Privy Council for the offence.    From the date of her commission until 20th September, 1703, the Royal Mary was on duty on the east coast of Scotland convoying Scots shipping between the Firth of Forth and Orkney.     The Dumbarton Castle  was during the same period performing similar work between the Sound of Mull and Lambay Island near Dublin. With charac­teristic Scotch thrift the Royal Mary was lent out during the winter of 1703-4 to her captain for a trading voyage to Italy with a cargo of salmon and herring. On 14th March, 1704, the two frigates were again commissioned and were ordered to their former stations on the east and west coasts of Scotland.

 

Meantime the Scots government had issued letters of marque on 3rd January,  1704,  to the Annandale, Captain Ap Rice, and on 29th February to the Alexander Gaily, of Queensferry, Captain Stewart.    The Annandale, belonging to the African Company of Scotland, was fitted out, an expiring effort to prosecute the East Indian trade. On her maiden voyage to the East she was detained in the Downs by the East India Company of England and was condemned as prize.    This was the cause of the capture in reprisal by the African Company in Leith roads in February, 1705, of the English ship the Worcester, commanded by Captain Green.    On 5th March, Green and others of this crew were condemned to death by the Scottish Court of Admiralty for piracy and for murdering Captain Drummond of the Speedy Return, belonging to the African Company; and he  and two  others were hanged.    This incident gave rise to such extraordinary bitterness of feeling between England and Scotland, that it became an important compelling cause of the Union of 1707.

In the course of the cruise of the Royal Mary in 1704, Captain Gordon succeeded in capturing two or three French privateers. Writing in April, 1704, to Lord Cromartie, Joint Secretary of State for Scotland, Lord Seafield, Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, reported that Captain Gordon had cleared the coast of sea privateers, having chased three of them.[Fraser's Earls of Cromartie, vol. i, p. 235.] One French frigate was reported to the Privy Council on 15th May, 1704, as having been brought into Leith. The subsequent proceedings regarding this capture show that the prisoners were sent in September under convoy by sea to Newcastle to be exchanged by the English Ad­miralty for Scots prisoners in France.    Another French privateer, the Marmedon of Dunkirk, was captured early in August.    That same month Captain Gordon captured the Katherine of Rotterdam on a voyage from the Canaries to   Rotterdam.     She  was  laden   with  wine   and  was equipped with a French passport ' which was discovered to Captain Gordon by the cook of the said ship in revenge to the captain, who had the day before beaten him, and she is ordered this day [August 29] to be brought into Leith harbour in order to the selling both the bottom and the cargo.' [Portland Papers, Hist. MSS. Com. iv, 117.]   Her capture and confiscation gave rise to prolonged diplomatic representations by the Estates of Holland ;   and the matter was not settled for years, though the influence of the Crown was used for her owners. Diplomatic correspondence with the Lord High Treasurer [ Treasury Papers, vol. clxxvii, 8, P.R.O.] about this capture was drawn out as late as June, 1714. There is no record of any captures in 1704 by the Dum­barton Castle.

After the usual stay in harbour during winter the two frigates were again, in February and in March, 1705, commissioned for service, the Royal Mary doing convoy duty between Tynemouth  and Orkney.    On 25th May the Dumbarton Castle captured a French privateer of eight guns and brought her into Greenock, whence sixty-two of her crew were transferred to Glasgow tolbooth. About the same time Captain Gordon captured an Ostend privateer of four guns, called the St. Trinity, commanded by Jean Sable.    From the Queen's letter of 19th August, 1707, we learn that the St. Esprit, an Ostend privateer of four guns, was captured by the Royal Mary near Fraserburgh in 1705.     In 1705, owing to the strained relations existing between England and Scotland, arising out of Captain Green's affair, the old method of exchang­ing prisoners through the English Admiralty received a check.    In June, 1705, the Privy Council, on the petition of the magistrates of Aberdeen, a town which had three ships recently captured by the French and Ostenders, liberated the French prisoners captured in Jean Sable's ship by Captain Gordon in the hopes that Scots prisoners in France and in the Spanish Netherlands would be similarly released. This action was resented in Eng­land, and on 28th June the Depute Secretary of State for Scotland strongly expressed Lord Godolphin the Treasurer's disapproval of it. All the same the new method seems to have worked satisfactorily judging from the minute of the Privy Council of 13th December, 1705. In June, July and August, 1705, Captain Gordon was at Tynemouth running on shore from the Royal Mary, for his friend Colonel Villiers the governor, supplies of French wines and other dutiable goods. [Treasury Papers, vol xcvii, No. 40, P.R.O.]

That same year Colonel Nathaniel Hooke, a Jacobite emissary from the Court of Louis, made his first visit to Scotland in the interest of the Old Pretender.    The time was considered opportune for an attempt to restore the exiled dynasty, owing to the bitter feeling between Eng­land and Scotland and the growing unpopularity of the proceedings just commencing which culminated, two years later, in the corporate union of the two countries.   Hooke's Memoirs disclose a typical case of the common practice of  Scotsmen in those days giving hostages to fortune on both sides.   

However careful Captain Gordon was in convoying   Scots   shipping,   and   faithful   in   capturing French and Ostend privateers, out of which he could make handsome prize money, he was not averse, under the influence of the Countess of Erroll, from putting his telescope to his blind eye when a French ship brought over  Jacobite  political  agents  to  Scotland.    Fourteen signals were agreed upon between Captain Gordon and the  Captain  of  the  French  frigate  Audacious,  which brought over Hooke, whereby they could recognise and avoid each other.

The need for further protection against French and Spanish privateers became so great that on 8th September, 1705, the Royal William was outrigged at the expense of the Royal Burghs, put in commission, and stationed on the east coast. Captain Thomas Gordon of the Royal [Mary was promoted to her command on 7th November, 1705, and James Hamilton of Orbieston, Lanarkshire, was on the same date posted to the command of the Royal Mary. On 22nd December blank commissions were issued for other officers of the three Scots frigates, but none of these were filled up until 12th March, 1706. On that date David Prescio was appointed lieutenant and George Hay master of the Royal William, and William Hay lieutenant, and Patrick Hay master of the Royal Mary. Earlier, on 7th March, sailing orders were issued to Thomas Gordon, commodore of the Royal William and Royal Mary, stationed on the east coast of Scotland, to guard the shipping on that coast and convoy it between Tynemouth and the Orkney Islands. Captain Campbell was again posted to his old station on the west coast of Scotland and England. In May, 1706, the Royal William was in Gothenburg being fitted with new masts, and was ordered to convoy twenty-five to thirty sail for Scotland. [Mar and Kellie Papers, Hist. MSS. Com., p. 202. ] In June the Royal William and Royal Mary were so busily engaged in guarding the east coast against small privateers, that they could not be spared to go to the Baltic to convoy Scots shipping from there to Scot­land, and the English Navy was appealed to for the necessary convoy. That same month Captain Gordon raised the old question of the English Navy's claim to be saluted by the Scots men-of-war striking to them. At the same time he referred to the Lord High Admiral of Scotland a complaint by the Captain of the Dunwich, English man-of-war, that he fired an evening and morning gun in an English port. His vessel the Royal William had by this time become so crank that the Privy Council allowed the derelict guns of the Bass, lying at Leith, to be used as ballast for her. Early in July the Dumbarton Castle captured a French privateer and put on shore seventy prisoners. The daily allowances made by government to the prisoners for sustenance was 10s. or 12s. Scots for a captain, 6s. Scots for a lieutenant or mate, and 3s. or 4s. Scots for an ordinary seaman. In July or August the Royal Mary captured another privateer. The three frigates of the Scots Navy were in commission as late as November, 1706; and were probably laid up in harbour during the winter. They were again recommissioned in March, 1707, and were ordered to their old stations, where they remained under Scots control until the union in May, 1707. In June, 1707, Captain Gordon, then commodore of the two frigates guarding the east coast, hoodwinked his junior colleague, Captain Hamilton, and concerted with the Earl of Erroll how to steer clear of a French frigate under M. de Ligondez, which was then on the north-east coast of Scotland attending Colonel Hooke.

In Queen Anne's reign the policy of recruiting the English Navy from Scotland was continued as in King William's reign, though in a modified manner. No com­pulsory levy of a fixed number of seamen was ordered, enlistment being made voluntary.

 

CHAPTER V

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XVIII, No. 330.

The Queen's Letter to the Lords Commissioners of Treasury anent the Frigates for the Defence and Security of the Coasts.

 

ANNE R.—Right trusty . . . we greet you well. We understand by our Secretaries [ On 12th May 1702, the Earl of Seafield and the Duke of Queensberry were appointed Joint Secretaries of State for Scotland.] that the funds given in the last session of Parliament were given partly for the outreiking [ Outrigging.] and main­taining frigates for the defence and security of the coasts in this time of war, and that the Commissioners of our Admiralty have given a particular account to our Secretaries for our information, that two frigates one for the east coast and the other for the west coast are needful to be outreiked so soon as may be, and of what money it will require for to outreik them and maintain them monthly the time requisite for to have them at sea, but that the funds given will not fall due for some time, so that of neces­sity there must be an advance upon credit for the ends above mentioned: Therefore we have thought fit to recommend this whole matter to your care, empowering you to allow such an en­couragement for advance as shall be needful to the end that, as you shall receive account from our Admiralty, you may use your endeavours to have them answered. And that it may appear there is nothing left undone which may render that security, which was intended by the Parliament, effectual, it hath also been represented that the biggest of the frigates,[The Royal William] which is not to be out-reiked at this time, is in an ill condition and like to perish, and therefore we do likewise recommend it to your best care to prevent this loss and inconvenience. For doing whereof this shall be your warrant: And so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at Windsor Castle the 25th day of August 1702 and of our reign the 1st year.

By her Majesty's comand,

QUEENSBERRY.

 

 

State Papers Domestic Naval (Entry Book), 1703-8.  P.R.O.

Miscellaneous Correspondence.

Admiralty Office,    11th February, 1702-3.

 

Sir,—Being informed this morning that her Majesty hath not yet sent to the Council of Scotland for the seamen which the frigates are going to that kingdom to fetch for the fleet, I thought it necessary to acquaint you therewith, and to desire that you will move the Rt. Honoble. the Earl of Nottingham therein.

I am,

Your most humble servt.,

J.  BURCHETT.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XVIII, No. 708.

The Queen's Letter to the Lords Commissioners of Treasury in Favour of Captain Gordon and Partners.

 

ANNE R.—Right trusty ... we greet you well. Whereas we understand that James Gordon, merchant in Edinburgh, and George Lockhart, merchant in Glasgow in that our ancient kingdom,. and other merchants joined with them, do intend a trading voyage to the East Indies, providing that they may have the use of our ship the Royal William now lying in harbour of Burntisland in our said kingdom as she now is, they being at all further expenses in rigging and fitting out the said ship for her voyage: And we considering that the said ship is more liable to rotting and decaying by her not being used than if she were, and having no occasion at this time to employ her in our service, are willing to give all proper encouragements to trade, and resolved to bestow a mark of our royal favour upon the said James Gordon, George Lockhart and Thomas Gordon (who is to be captain of our said ship for the voyage) and others who shall join with them: It is therefore our will and pleasure, and we do hereby authorise and require you to cause deliver to the said Captain Thomas Gordon, for the use of the said James Gordon and George Lockhart, and others who shall join in partnership with them our said ship the Royal William, as she now lies in the foresaid harbour with what masts, guns, sails and other rigging did belong to her at her last coming from sea, they finding sufficient security for redelivering the said ship with all guns, masts, sails and other rigging so delivered to them at her return, and also all addition of the necessary equipments which shall be purchased by the said partners towards carrying on a voyage to the East Indies (sea hazard excepted), without any allowance made to them for what they had so purchased. For doing of which this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at St. James's the 29th day of ffebruary 1702-3 and of our reign the first year.

 By her Majesty's command,

TARBAT. [The Duke of Queensberry, Principal Secretary of State for Scotland, was Lord High Commissioner to the Scots Parliament which sat from 6th May to 16th September, 1703.]

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    31st March, 1703.

Recommendation to the Lord Chancellor [The Earl of Seafield]  to write to the Secretary anent Convoys and Cruisers.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the said Lord High Chancellor to take what method his Lordship shall think most proper for desiring of her Majesty and his Royal Highness, Prince George of Denmark, Lord High Admiral of England, that convoys be seasonably allowed to Scots merchant ships trading from England to Scotland, and that cruisers be appointed to cruise upon the coasts of Scotland from St. Abbs Head to Orkney, and upon the western coasts of this kingdom for securing the coasts and ships trading there from privateers.

 

Ibidem (resume).

Permission is given to the captains of two of her Majesty's men-of-war lying in the road of Leith to recruit seamen volunteers in all sea towns between Stirling and Aberdeen, also on the Clyde from Glasgow to Ayr, and from Eyemouth to Leith, the magistrates being in­structed to aid them in this.

 

Hume of Grossrigs Diary, p. 103.

Occurrences in Parliament.

 

Tuesday, June 1.—. . . Motions about rigging out the frigates for clearing the coasts full of French privateers.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    12th June, 1703.

Recommendation to the Treasury for Outrigging Her Majesty's Two Ships of War for Pre­serving Trade &c.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner[The Duke of Queensbury, principal Secretary of State for Scotland, was Lord High Commissioner to the Scots Parliament which sat from 6th May to 16th September 1703.] and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council having considered the many informations given in to them of the damages sustained by the merchants in this kingdom in their trade both on the east and western coasts by French privateers, find it necessary that her Majesty's two ships of war called the Mary and Dumbarton Castle be outrigged and employed for her Majesty's service in securing the trade of this kingdom and coasts thereof from the insults of French privateers, and any damages that the merchants and trade of this kingdom may sustain by them, and therefore recommend to the Lords of her Majesty's Treasury to take effectual course for outrigging of the said two ships of war, and to order and give warrant for payment of such sums of money as shall be neces­sary for the effect and service abovementioned, and for maintaining the said two ships of war at sea with the men and officers aboard the same for the space of four months after the first day of July next to come ; and recommend to Lieutenant General George Ramsay,[Third son of George, second Earl of Dalhousie, served in the Low Countries; promoted Brigadier-General in 1690, and after Landen in 1693 Major-General; was promoted Lieutenant General on his appointment to the Scottish command in 1702.] commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom, to order such a number of the said forces to march and be shipped aboard the said two men of war with officers to command them, as the Lords of her Majesty's Treasury shall appoint.

 

Warrant to the Two Captains of the Scots Frigates to Levy Seamen.

 

His  Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council having heard a representation made to them by the Lord High Chancellor that the captains of her Majesty's two frigates formerly appointed to be  outrigged  for  defending  the  coasts  against pirating had difficulty in engaging seamen aboard the said frigates, his Grace and the said Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council ordain the magistrates of the respective burghs and sea port towns within this kingdom, or any other persons having warrant from the said captains of the said two frigates, to   beat   drums   within   the   respective   bounds of the said burghs and seaport towns for intimating to all able seamen who by their own free consent given before a magistrate are willing to serve aboard her Majesty's said two frigates, that they repair to the said two captains and there offer themselves to them or either of them ; and ordain all magistrates and others within the burghs and seaport towns foresaid to give all due encouragement to the said two captains and others employed by them in levying seamen as above, and prohibit and discharge any disorders and abuses to be committed by the said two captains and other persons to be employed by them, as said is, in taking on the said seamen, but always to keep themselves within the bounds the law prescribes.

 

Seafield Correspondence (Scottish History Society), p. 363.

Edinburgh.    14th June, 1703.

For William Lorimer, Chamberlain to the Earl of Seafield at Cullen.

 

Affectionate Cousin,— . . . The government here are fitting out two men of war to cruise on our coast, which will be ready within twenty days, and these two will be thought sufficient to beat off the small privateers. Besides the English have promised to send down two men of war from London more. When these come or our own ships are ready, I shall timeously advertise you to put the victual aboard again. My Lord com­mends what you have done, and till the men of war be upon the coast the ships must stay, for better they be in Portsoy than Dunkirk.

I am

Your most affectionate cousin and servant,

JOHN PHILP.[Private Secretary to the Earl of Seaneld.   See Seafield Cor­respondence, pp. 222-3]

 

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    3rd July, 1703.

Committee for Preparing Instructions to the Two Captains of Her Majesty's Frigates the Royal Mary and Dumbarton Castle.

 

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby nominate and appoint the Marquis of Annandale, Lord President of Privy Council, the Duke of Argyll, the Earl of Eglintoun, Earl of Loudoun, Lord Boyle, Treasurer-Depute, and Mr. Francis Montgomery, with the Lord Advocate, to be a committee to prepare instructions for Captain Thomas Gordon, captain of her Majesty's frigate called the Royal Mary during the space formerly appointed for him to cruise, and appoint the same to be laid before the Council next Council day; and recommend to the said com­mittee to meet Monday morning at ten of the clock in the forenoon ; and declare any three a sufficient quorum.

 

Ibidem (resume).

Edinburgh.    3rd July, 1703.

 

Petition to the Council by James Frogg, merchant in Edinburgh. He and his partners purchased from George Robertson of Newbigging, Steward depute of Orkney, 1000 bolls of bear, [ Bear or big, a species of Scots barley.] Orkney measure, out of her Majesty's rents from these islands, and freighted ships under com­mand of John Spence, skipper in Leith, and John Bosswell skipper in Burntisland for its conveyance in proper time, but the said skippers not sailing, they required them to do so in form of instru­ment, protesting for damages if they failed.    But John Spence declared he would not be so liable as he was ready with a sufficient, able and skilful crew for his voyage when Captain Gordon, com­mander of one of H.M. ships had taken his whole crew, and declared that he had authority from their Lordships so to do ; and Spence declared that in such a case he must be free of his charter party. The petitioners represent that by the delay they have already sustained great damage by loss of markets and backwardness of the season, and crave that to prevent further the said crew may be delivered back to John Spence. The Lords find and declare that the said crew voluntarily engaged with Captain Gordon and therefore belong to him.

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    13th July, 1703.

Recommendation to Her Majesty's Advocate anent the two Commissions to the Captains of Her Majesty's two Frigates.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to Sir James Steuart, her Majesty's Advocate, and appoint Sir Gilbert Elliot, one of their clerks, to wait upon his Lord­ship, and draw up two several commissions with the usual powers in the like cases, one for Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's frigate called the Royal Mary, and the other for Captain [Mathew] Campbell, commander of her Majesty's other frigate called the Dumbarton Castle, and recommend to the said Lord Advocate to bring in the same to the Council the next Council day with their sailing orders.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    15th July, 1703.

Committee for Adjusting the two Commissions and General and Particular Instructions to be Observed by the Captains of Her Majesty's two Frigates.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby nominate and appoint the Marquis of Annandale, Lord President of Privy Council, the Duke of Argyll, the Earls of Eglintoun and Loudoun, the Viscount Tarbat, Lord Secretary, the Lord Boyle, [Appointed Treasurer-Depute in December, 1702, and created Earl of Glasgow in 1703.] Treasurer-Depute, and Mr. Francis Montgomery, with the Lord Advocate, to be a committee to adjust the two commissions for, and the general and particular instructions to be observed by the two captains of her Majesty's two frigates called the Royal Mary and Dumbarton Castle ; and recommend to the said committee to meet the morrow at nine of the clock in the forenoon, and declare any two a quorum.

 

Ibidem.

The Abbey of Holyrood House.    16th July, 1703.

Commission  [See also State Papers {Scotland)   Warrant Books, vol.  xix, No.  12, where the commission is given dated 17th July, and Hist.   MSS.   Commission,   Stirling-   Home-   Drummond-Moray papers, 1885, p. 185.] in Favour of Captain Thomas Gordon to be Commander of Her Majesty's Ship the Royal Mary.

 

Commission to Captain Thomas Gordon to be captain  and commander of her  Majesty's ship the Royal Mary voted and approven, whereof the tenor follows :—

 

Anne, by the Grace of God, Queen of Scotland, England,  France and Ireland, Defender  of the faith, with advice and consent of the Lords of our Privy Council, do hereby constitute and appoint you, Captain Thomas Gordon, captain and com­mander of her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary, willing and requiring you forthwith to go on board of the said ship and take upon you the charge and  command  of  captain  in  her  accordingly; strictly charging and commanding all the officers, seamen and soldiers belonging to the said ship to  behave themselves  jointly  and  severally in their respective  stations  and employment with all  due   respect   and  obedience  unto you their said captain ; and you likewise to observe and execute as well the instructions herewith to you delivered by our Privy Council and attested by their clerk as what further orders and directions you   shall   from   time   to   time   receive    from us   or   them   or any other  superior officers for our   service.    And   we  being  now  engaged in war with the French King and King of  Spain and  their adherents,   we   hereby give you  fur­ther power and commission not only to defend against but attack these  our  enemies and with all your force to  subdue   and seize them  and their   ships   and   goods  to   be  declared lawful prize ;   wherein you nor none of you are to fail, as you will answer the contrary at your peril; and for so doing  these presents (being recorded in the books of our Privy Council and to continue till  recalled)   shall  be  your  sufficient   warrant. Given by warrant and  under the signet of our Privy Council at our palace of Holyrood House, the sixteenth day of July, 1703.

(Sic subscribitur) QUEENSBERRY, COMMR.;

SEAFIELD, CANCELLAR.;

ANNANDALE, [William, Earl of Annandale, was  in June, 1701, created a Marquess.     He was in December, 1702, appointed President of the Privy Council,  and on 9th March, 1705, Joint Secretary of State for Scotland.]

ATHOLL, P.S., [ Privy Seal.]

ARGYLL,

CRAFURD,

MAR,

MORTON,

LEVEN,

BOYLE.

 

 

Follow the instructions for the said captain for the better executing of his commission :—

 

By her Majesty's High Commissioner and the remanent Lords and others of her Majesty's Privy Council, the instructions following are given to Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's ship called the Royal Mary in prosecution and for better executing of his com­mission, and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril.

 

You are immediately to sail taking her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle in com­pany with you the length of the Isles of Orkney, where you are to let him part for the station appointed to him.

 

You are to take under your convoy all vessels bound' to the northward and carefully see such of them safe into their respective harbours so far as Orkney.  Then you are to return and call along the coast for all vessels bound for the Firth, [of Forth] and take all who are ready from place to place under your convoy.

If no vessels be ready to come out of harbours when you call, you are to cruise ten days between the Staples and the Islands of Zetland where your station is appointed to be, and call again for what ships are to come to the Firth, and take them under your convoy as above.

You are carefully from time to time to advise us of all that occurs during your cruise.

You are to defend yourself and all ships under your convoy against all her Majesty's enemies, whether French or Spaniards, and all others with whom her Majesty is at present engaged in war, who will presume to attack you, to the ut­most of your power, and to endeavour by all your force to subdue them and make and bring them in as prize to be declared such.

You are also as you find occasion and yourself in condition to attack and set upon all her Majesty's said enemies, and endeavour by all your force to subdue them and seize their ships and goods.

You are also to search all ships going to or coming from France or Spain or any of the dominions belonging to the said kingdoms, and if you find them carrying contraband goods to any enemy's country to seize them their ships and whole goods and bring them in as prize.

You are to observe the time of your cruising and all other articles contained in your contract with the Lords of her Majesty's Treasury. Given at   Holyrood  House the sixteenth day of July, I7O3

 

Commission to David Prescio[Sometimes written ' Preshow ' and ' Preschio.'] to be Lieutenant of her Majesty's Ship the Royal Mary.

 

Commission to David Prescio to be lieutenant of her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary, read, voted and approven and subscribed by a quorum of the Council in manner underwritten, of the which commission the tenor follows :—

 

Anne, by the grace of God, Queen of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the faith, with advice and consent of the Lords of our Privy Council do hereby constitute and appoint you, David Prescio, lieutenant of her Majesty's ship called the Royal Mary, willing and requiring you to take upon you the charge and command of lieutenant under the captain of the said ship, strictly commanding and charging all the inferior officers, seamen and soldiers belonging to the said ship to behave themselves jointly and severally in their respective stations and employments, with all due respect and obedience unto you, their said lieutenant; and you likewise to observe and execute, in absence of the captain, all orders and instructions that shall be immediately directed to you by our Privy Council, attested by their clerk from time to time, or any orders to be given you from us or your said captain or any other your superior officers for our service. And we being now engaged in war with the French King and King of Spain and their adherents, we hereby give you further power and commission not only to defend against but to attack these our enemies, and with all your force to subdue and seize them and their ships and goods to be declared lawful prize, wherein you nor none of you are to fail as you will answer to the contrary at your peril. And for so doing these presents (being recorded in the books of our Privy Council and to continue till recalled) shall be your sufficient warrant. Given by warrant and under the signet of our Council, at our palace of Holyrood House, the sixteenth day of July, 1703.

(Sic subscribitur) QUEENSBERRY, Comr.;

SEAFIELD,  Cancellar. ;

ANNANDALE, P.;

ATHOLL, P.S.;

ARGYLL,

CRAFURD,

MAR,

LEVEN,

BOYLE.

 

There is also a warrant appointing James Midltoune to be master of the Royal Mary, in similar terms, and dated as the foregoing.

 

Ibidem.

The Abbey of Holyrood House.    16th July, 1703.

Commission to Captain Mathew Campbell to  be Captain of the Ship the Dumbarton Castle.  [See   State   Papers    {Scotland)    Warrant   Books,   vol.   xix, No. 13, where the Commission is given dated 17th July, 1703.]

 

Commission to Captain Mathew Campbell to be captain and commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, read, voted and approven, and subscribed by a quorum of the Council in manner underwritten. Follows the said commission :—

ANNE, by the Grace of God, Queen of Scotland, England,  France and Ireland,  Defender of the faith, with advice and consent of the Lords of our Privy Council, do hereby constitute and appoint you, Captain Mathew Campbell, captain and commander of her Majesty's ship the Dum­barton Castle, willing and requiring you forth­with [as in the previous commission to Captain Thomas Gordon]. . . .

 

Follow the instructions for the said Captain Campbell for the better executing the foresaid commission :—

By her Majesty's High Commissioner and the remanent Lords and others of her Majesty's Privy Council, the instructions following are given to Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, in prosecution and for better executing of his com­mission and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril.

You are immediately to sail from the road of Leith with and in company of Captain Gordon to the Islands of Orkney.

When you part with him you are to make the best of your way for the western coast.

When you arrive there you are to cruise from the Sound of Mull in the Highlands to the Mull of Galloway, and from thence the length of Lambie [Lambay] Island, near Dublin, and to take and have under your protection and convoy all vessels and ships belonging to her Majesty's subjects that shall fall in your way.

You are to defend yourself and ships under your convoy against all her Majesty's enemies whether French or Spaniards [as in the instruc­tions to Captain Gordon].

 

At the end is added :—

 

You are carefully from time to time to advise us of all that occurs during your cruise. Given at Holyrood House, the sixteenth day of July, 1703 years.

 

There is also a warrant to Robert Russell to be master of the Dumbarton Castle, in terms similar to the previous warrant.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    4th August, 1703.

Act: Captain Mathew Campbell.

 

Anent the petition given in to her Majesty's Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council by Captain Mathew Campbell, shewing that his Grace and the said Lords would be pleased to consider that the season of the year was far spent, and that by the petitioner's instructions from the said Lords the petitioner is obliged to keep company with Captain Gordon and the rest of the vessels the length of the Orkneys, and therefore humbly craving the said Lords would be pleased to alter the first two articles of his instructions by allowing the petitioner to make the best of his way for the west seas where he was appointed to cruise, and to take along with the petitioner what ships were going his way; as also that the said Lords would be pleased to give him a precept upon the commissaries for eleven pounds sterling, which the petitioner had paid since he came in for two top masts and two yards, in regard the old ones were useless and rotten, which could not be known while they carried sail, as the petition bears ; his Grace, her Majesty's High Commissioner, and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council, having considered the above petition given in to them by Captain Mathew Campbell, and the same being read in their presence, his Grace and the said Lords do hereby appoint the said Captain Mathew Campbell immediately to pursue his voyage from the road of Leith to the west seas, for the cruise formerly appointed him there, notwithstanding of any article of his former instructions to the contrary.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XIX, No. 59.

The Queen's Letter to the Lords Commissioners of Treasury ordering them to deliver to Captain Thomas Gordon the Ship the Royal Mary.

 

ANNE R.,—Right trusty and right well-beloved cousin and councillor. ... we greet you well. Whereas we having taken into our royal con­sideration a proposal made by Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of our ship the Royal Mary belonging to that our ancient kingdom, for having the use of the said ship as she now is for a voyage to Italy, with salmonds, herrings and other goods of the product of that kingdom, he being at all charges for fitting her out for the said voyage, and to redeliver her for our use in or about the month of April next or sooner, if she shall perfect the said voyage : And considering that she may sustain more damage by being laid up this winter, as she is now ordered, than by making the said voyage, and that the voyage may be of great benefit to these of our subjects who shall be concern'd in it; wherefore it is our will and pleasure, and we do hereby authorise and require you to cause deliver to Captain Thomas Gordon our said ship the Royal Mary for the use aforesaid, with what masts, guns, sails and other rigging do now belong to her, he finding sufficient security for redelivering the said ship with all guns, masts, sails and other rigging so delivered to him some time on the month of April next (all hazards at sea excepted) so that she may be ready at that time for what service we shall think fit to employ her in. And lest any loss should happen to her at sea or from the enemy you are to oblige him to insure her against such at his own charge for our benefit before her entry on the said voyage ; for doing whereof this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at St. James's the 6th day of November, 1703, and of our reign the second year—

By her Majesty's command,

QUEENSBERRY.

 

Ibidem, No. 96.

Commission to Captain John Ap-Rice to be Com­mander of the Ship Annandale.

 

Anne R.—Anne by the grace of God Queen of Scotland, England, France and Ireland, De­fender of the faith &c : to our trusty and well-beloved Captain John Ap-Rice, commander of the ship the Annandale of two hundred and twenty tons burden or thereby, mounted with twenty guns and a suitable number of small arms, and navigated by forty-eight seamen, or to any other commander of the said ship for the time being, greeting: Whereas we have thought it necessary for the honour and safety of this our ancient kingdom of Scotland and all other our dominions to declare war by sea and land against the French and Spanish Kings their subjects and allies, for redress (as much as in us lies) of those injuries and oppressions which our subjects have suffered from the French and Spanish Kings in several parts of the world, both in and out of Europe, we out of our princely care for the safety protection and further advancement of the East India trade wherein the honour and profit of all our dominions is so much concerned have thought   fit   to   authorise   and   impower,   and accordingly do by these presents authorise and impower you to fight with and take by force of arms all such ships as you shall meet with, belonging to the French and Spanish Kings or any of their subjects or allies, and their goods and merchandise trading or being in any parts or places within the limits of the charter and letters patent granted by Act of Parliament to the Company of this our ancient kingdom trading to Africa and the Indies, or in any other place whatsoever on this side the Cape Bona Esperance, as also the ships and goods of any pirates of whatsoever nation that you may meet in your voyage:    And   if   you happen   to   be   outward bound at the time of such capture, you are to carry such French and Spanish ships with their loading to be tried in any Court of Admiralty in the East Indies ;   if homeward bound to be tried in our High Court Admiralty in Scotland : And we do hereby require you to keep an exact journal   of your  proceedings,  and  therein  par­ticularly to take notice of all prizes which shall be taken by you, the nature of such prizes, the time and place of their being taken, and the value of them as near as you can judge ;  of which and all other occurrences you shall from time to time send account to the Lord High Admiral or any executing the office of Lord High Admiral of our said kingdom of Scotland for the time.     And we do further will and command you take care that  all  prizes  taken by you  in  your voyage outward be brought to some place in the East Indies, where  there is  Court of Admiralty, to­gether with the ships papers and three or four of the chief of the company of such ships who are to be produced   before the Judge   of   the Admiralty, or such as shall be appointed by that court to be sworn and examined upon such interrogatories as they shall produce to the dis­covery of the truth touching the interest or property of such ship vessel and goods taken. And you are to keep in safety such ships vessels and goods as shall be taken in your voyage outward or homeward, and not break bulk, sell, waste, spoil or diminish the same before judg­ment be first given in our Admiralty Court in Scotland or in the East Indies respectively, that the same are lawful prizes, or until some other court shall by a provisional order decree the same to be sold in the accustomed manner of prizes. And you are also to take care that the tenth part of all such vessels and goods as shall be taken and adjudged good and lawful prizes as aforesaid, being the right of the High Admiral of Scotland, be truly paid as we shall direct: In witness whereof we have caused our royal signet of our kingdom of Scotland to be affixed to these presents, together with the seal of our Admiralty. These given under our royal hand at our Court at St. James's the 3rd day of January, 1703-4, and of our reign the second year.

By her Majesty's command,

QUEENSBERRY.

 

Ibidem, No. 173.

Commission to Captain John Stewart, Commander of the Alexander Gaily of Queensferry.

 

ANNE R.,—Anne by the grace of God, Queen of Scotland, England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the faith &c: To all and Sundry, Kings, Princes, Dukes, Governors of Republics, Admirals and Commanders of Navies, Magistrates of Burghs, Governors  of   Ports   and   Castles   in friendship and confederacy with us, greeting. Forasmuch as we considering that Captain John Stewart, commander of the ship the Alexander Gaily of Queensferry, hath offered to serve us with the foresaid ship against the ships and goods belonging to the French King and Philip, King of Spain, and against all ships and goods of and belonging to any of the subjects or other inha­bitants of the countries dominions and territories pertaining to the said French King and King of Spain ; and we being sufficiently informed of the loyalty courage and conduct of the said Captain John Stewart, know ye us to have nominated and appointed, likeas we by these presents nominate and appoint the said Captain John Stewart to be captain of the said good ship or frigate called the Alexander Gaily of Queensferry of one hundred and fifty tons burden or thereabout, and carrying twenty pieces of ordnance, with all munition proportionable as a man-of-war commissioned in our actual service : Giving granting and committing to the Captain John Stewart full power, warrant, commission and charge to order and command the officers, soldiers and mariners of the said ship or frigate in all things belonging to the power and office of a captain or commander of a man-of-war, and to furnish the said ship or frigate with men, arms, victuals, artillery great and small and other warlike munitions and provisions, and therein and there­with to set forth and go to sea and to search for follow and pursue after as also to take and apprehend, and in case of resistance to fire, burn, sink and destroy the ships and goods of the said French King and King of Spain, and the ships and goods of their subjects or of the inhabitants of  countries,   dominions   and  territories  of  the said French King and King of Spain ; as also to stay and arrest all other ships and vessels of whatsoever other kingdom or country nation or people conveying any goods or merchandise in them belonging to the said French King and King of Spain or to their subjects or to the in­habitants of the said dominions, and carrying any soldiers, horses, ships or vessels or any arms offensive or defensive or any ammunitions or provisions, naval stores or any other counterband goods or merchandise whatsoever, and to bring the said ships and goods so apprehended and arrested to any port or harbour within our kingdom of Scotland without breaking bulk or altering the property thereof, to be proceeded against and adjudged according to law in our High Court of Admiralty of our said kingdom or in such other court or courts as by particular and special warrant and commission shall be sufficiently authorised for doing the same ; and after such proceeding and adjudgment to be sold and disposed of as to right appertains ; Providing always that out of such ships and vessels, and also out of all such goods, wares and merchandise whatsoever as shall be adjudged lawful prizes, there be paid to us or any having our warrant the just fifteenth thereof, or the customs as shall be required by our Lord High Treasurer or Commissioners of our Treasury, and the tenths to our Lord High Admiral or Commissioners of Admiralty or any having their warrant; authorising you the said captain generally to do and perform all and every other thing that towards the execution of the whole premises is necessary and requisite, and what is in use to be allowed to ships of War having the like commissions  from  other  admirals:    Requesting you and every one of you the said Kings, Princes, Dukes, Governors of Republics, Admirals, Com­manders of Navies and Governors of Ports and Castles in friendship and confederacy with us to acknowledge the said captain and company of his said ship as our good and lawful subjects, authorised with this our warrant and commission ; and if the said captain shall come in to your or any of your harbours, bounds, coasts or terri­tories with or without any prizes taken by him, that you furnish him with victuals and other necessaries upon his own reasonable expenses, and that ye defend from and resist all violence that shall be offered to him his company or equipage, or to their ships or goods, and show all other rites and offices of common friendship and alliance to us, intreating well the said captain and his company, as we shall on all occasions of that nature cause the like to be shown to you and your subjects; ordaining these presents to continue during the whole time of the war betwixt us and the said French King and King of Spain, at least till the same be discharged and recalled by us : Given under our royal hand and signet at our Court at St. James's the 29th day of February, 1703-4, and of our reign the second year.

By her Majesty's command,

CROMERTIE.

 

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    14th March, 1704.

Recommendation to the Lieutenant-General to send a Detachment of Forces to the Two Men-of-War.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to Lieutenant-General George Ramsay, commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom, to order such a number of the said forces to be shipped aboard the two ships and men-of-war called the Royal Mary and Dumbarton Castle, with officers to command them, as the Lords of her Majesty's Treasury shall appoint, and as near as may be the same forces and officers formerly employed for defending of the coasts against French privateers, when the said ships were last at sea.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    15th May, 1704.

Warrant for Committing the Captain and Lieu­tenant of the French Ship taken by Captain Gordon Prisoners in Edinburgh Tolbooth, and ordaining the said Captain Gordon to bring ashore the Crew and commit them Prisoners to the Tolbooths of Leith and Canongate.

 

The Lord High Chancellor having represented to the Council that Captain Gordon, commander of  her Majesty's frigate the   Royal   Mary, had taken a French frigate and brought her up to the road of Leith where she with her crew are at present lying,  the said Lords of her Majesty's Privy   Council  do  hereby  appoint   and   ordain the captain and lieutenant of the said French ship taken by the said Captain Gordon to be committed prisoners to the tolbooth of Edinburgh, therein to remain till further orders ; and give order and warrant to the magistrates of Edinburgh and  keeper  of  their  tolbooth  to  receive  them prisoners  and  detain  them  therein";    and  also give order and warrant, and command and ordain the said Captain Gordon to bring the crew of the said French ship ashore and the one half thereof to commit prisoners to the tolbooth of Leith, and the other half prisoners in the tolbooth of Canon-gate, and for that effect give order and warrant to the magistrates of Leith and Canongate and keepers of their tolbooth to receive the prisoners and to keep, hold and detain them in their respec­tive   tolbooths   till   further   orders   of   Council thereanent;    and   command    and   ordain   the commandant for the time at Leith to provide and furnish a sufficient guard for transporting the crew to the respective tolbooths above-mentioned, and appoint and ordain each one of the said crew to have three shillings Scots[3 pence sterling] a day paid for their subsistence; and for that effect, recommend to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury to see the same effectually paid.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    6th June, 1704.

Recommendation to the Treasury for continuing the Cruise two months.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury to continue the cruise of the two Scots frigates for two months longer.

 

Recommendation to the Treasury anent the French Privateer.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury to cause pay to the captain of the French privateer the sum of ten shillings Scots daily, and to the lieutenant and mate each of them six shillings money foresaid, for their subsistence while in prison.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    13th June, 1704.

Recommendation to the Chancellor to write to the Secretary of State anent the French Prisoners being exchanged with Scots.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lord High Chancellor to write to the Secretary of State for this kingdom, that it may be laid before her Majesty to give orders to the commissioners of exchange of French prisoners, that the prisoners taken aboard of the French privateer by Captain Gordon may be exchanged with Scots men taken aboard of Scots vessels, now prisoners in France ; and, in the first place, with the eight or ten Scots prisoners lying and detained at Dumant taken aboard of a Scots ship, and then with such Scots prisoners as have been taken up in the English service or aboard of English vessels, and that the exchange of prisoners may be made accordingly.

 

Ibidem.

Holyrodd House.    20th July, 1704.

Recommendation to the Lord Advocate to call for and examine Skipper Rate his crew, and anent Passengers come to Scotland in Prescio's Ship.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to Sir James Steuart, her Majesty's Advocate, to call for and examine Skipper Rate in Borrowstouness and his crew anent the mate of the ship belonging to Captain Prescio which Captain Gordon, captain of her Majesty's frigate the Royal Mary, commanded before he got her Majesty's said frigate, and what passengers or other persons the said mate brought to Scotland with him ; as also to call for the said mate himself, and to inquire at him as aforesaid what persons he brought from Holland and landed in any part within this kingdom.

 

Ibidem.

Holyrood House.    7th August, 1704.

Warrant anent the Prisoners on Board the Dunkirk Privateer.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby give order and warrant, and command and ordain Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary, instantly to set ashore under a sufficient guard the captain, lieutenant, mate and whole sailors of the Dunkirk privateer[The Marmedon of Dunkirk] taken by the said Captain Gordon, and now lying in the road of Leith; and give order to the commandant at Leith to furnish a sufficient guard for bringing them ashore ; and appoint the officers of the said privateer to be sent under a safe guard to the tolbooth of Edinburgh, and the one half of the seamen to be sent under a guard, as said is, to the tolbooth of Leith, and the other half to the tolbooth of Canongate [Also written Cannongate]; and give order and warrant to the magistrates of Edinburgh, Leith and Canongate respective, keepers of their tolbooths, to receive them prisoners in their said tolbooths and detain them therein till further orders of Council: And recommend to the Lords of Treasury to grant such allowance for the sustenance of the seamen and officers of the said privateer during the time they are prisoners, as was allowed to the prisoners taken aboard the other privateer formerly taken by the said Captain Gordon.

 

Recommendation to his Grace the Lord High Com­missioner the Lords Chancellor and Secretary to write to Court anent the French Prisoners.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lord Commissioner[ John, Marquess of Tweeddale] his Grace the Lord High Chancellor[The Earl of Seafield]. and Secretary [The Earl of Cromartie].to write to Court in name of the Board anent the French prisoners taken by Captain Gordon, that it may please her Majesty to order the said prisoners to be received at Newcastle, and detained there till a convenient occasion of exchanging them with British prisoners, or other­wise to order a ship to come to the road of Leith and receive them there, to be transported and exchanged as said is.

 

Warrant to the Clerks of Council to deliver up the Commission and Instructions of the French Privateers to the Clerks of Admiralty upon Receipt.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do here­by give order and warrant to their clerks to deliver up to the Clerk of Admiralty Daniel Hamilton, writer in Edinburgh, appointed on 2ist October, 1702, by Charles, Duke of Lennox and Richmond, and confirmed by royal warrant 5th February, 1705.—S.P. (Scotland), Warrant Books, vol. xx.] the commission and other instructions of the privateer called the Marmedon of Dunkirk upon his receipt of the same.

 

 

 

 

Seafield Correspondence (Scottish History Society), p. 379.

Windsor.    12th August, 1704.

For the Earl of Seafield.

 

My Lord,— ... I have given a memorial to Sir Charles Hedges[Judge of the Admiralty Court, London, appointed 28th May, 1689.—Admiralty 3, No. 1 Minutes, P.R.O.] concerning the French prisoners, and I doubt not but so soon as he is well, for he is a little indisposed at present, they will order all the prisoners taken by our frigates to be received at Newcastle, and to be exchanged with our men, as they fall in course, according to the time of their being taken . . .

AL. WEDDERBURN. [Appointed on 10th June, 1704, to officiate as Under Secretary in the absence of the Secretary of State.   Appointed Deputy Secretary of State for Scotland on 25th October, 1704.—StatePapers (Scotland) Warrant Books, vol. xx.]2

 

 

The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, Vol. XI, pp. 195-6.

25th August, 1704.

Account of the Admiralty.

 

The accounts of the Admiralty read, whereof and of the observations thereon the tenors follow :—

The Accounts of the Admiralty given in by Hugh Cunningham.

Charge upon the Admiralty.

 

By cash received out of the Pole money and otherwise, two hundred and thirty-seven thousand five hundred and fifty - eight pounds, nine pennies 

237,558    0   9

From Sir Andrew Myretoun per the Treasury's precept in Sir George Hamilton's account. Forty-eight thousand pounds

   48,000   0   0

 

£285,558   0   9

 

 

Discharge.

For providing ships of war and maintaining the same with other necessaries thereto be­longing—two hundred and seventy-three thousand five hundred and fifty - eight pounds, nine pennies

273,558    0   9

Given to Sir Andrew Myretoun twelve thousand pounds

12,000   0    0

 

£285,558    o    9

 

 

Observations on the Accounts of the Admiralty.

 

1. That the first article had been considered by a particular account, and found fully instructed and applied for the uses of the Admiralty.

2 That the twelve thousand pounds mentioned in the discharge as given to Sir Andrew Myretoun, he retained the same for advancing thirty-six thousand pounds of the Treasury's precept men­tioned in the charge.

3. That considerable arrears are owing to the seamen, amounting to the sum of eighty-four thousand  pounds  or  thereby.       Upon  reading whereof the first observation sustained, the second observation remitted to the Commission to inquire thereanent and to report.

 

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Holyrood House.    30th August, 1704.

Recommendation to the Treasury to agree with a Ship to carry the French Prisoners to Newcastle.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury to agree with a ship to go from Leith to Newcastle, and carry on board thereof and deliver at the said port the French prisoners lying in the tolbooths of Edinburgh, Canongate and Leith, with Peter Dalaloun, Frenchman, now prisoner in the tolbooth of Edinburgh; and appoint and ordain Captain Gordon, commander of her Majesty's frigate the Royal Mary, to go and convoy the said ship from Leith to Newcastle, and to bring her with what Scots ships are lying there under his convoy back again to Leith.

 

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    4th September, 1704.

Recommendation to the General to send ten Sentinels and one Sergeant aboard Archibald Drummond's Ship for Carrying and Securing the French Prisoners to Newcastle.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to Lieutenant-General George  Ramsay,   commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom, to order between and the eighth day of September instant ten sentinels and one sergeant aboard of Archibald Drummond's ship, that is hired to carry the French prisoners from Leith to Newcastle, and that for securing the prisoners in the night time for preventing their running away with the said ship.

 

Warrant anent Transporting the French Prisoners to Newcastle.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby appoint and ordain the whole French prisoners that are lying in the tolbooths of Edin­burgh, Canongate and Leith (except Jacobus Soetenay and Gerard Druive and Jacob Strobbe, his two men, who are appointed to continue in prison) to be shipped aboard of Archibald Drum-mond his ship lying at Leith to be by him carried to Newcastle ; and for that effect appoint and ordain the magistrates of Edinburgh, Canongate and Leith and keepers of their tolbooths to deliver the persons of the whole French prisoners in their custody and tolbooths (except the said Jacobus Soetenay, and Gerard Druive and Jacob Strobbe, his said two men) to a party duly commanded to be sent by the Lieutenant-General to receive them off their hands and put them aboard of the said ship, and that without payment of any house dues ; and to the effect foresaid recommend to Lieutenant-General George Ramsay, commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces, to send upon the eighth day of September instant at eight of the clock in the morning to the respective tolbooths of Edinburgh, Canongate and Leith a sufficient and competent number of men duly commanded to receive from the said magistrates and keepers of their tolbooths the persons of the whole French prisoners in their custody (except the said captain and his said two men), and carry them to Leith and ship them aboard of Archibald Drummond's ship to be transported to Newcastle, as said is.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    5th September, 1704.

 

Warrant for the Captain of the French Privateer last taken by Captain Gordon to transport himself with the rest of the French Prisoners to Newcastle.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council appoint and ordain Peter Aggatt, captain of the French privateer last taken by Captain Gordon, to be shipped aboard of Archibald Drummond's ship and carried with the rest of the French prisoners to Newcastle upon his giving sufficient security under the penalty of one thousand pounds Scots that James Hyndeshaw, son to Gilbert Hyndeshaw, one of the keepers of Edinburgh tolbooth, now prisoner in Brest, shall be set at liberty and have a sufficient and valid pass with free liberty to him to return to Scotland without trouble or molestation; and upon the said captain his giving security, as said is, give order and warrant to the keepers of the tolbooth of Edinburgh, to deliver him to any having warrant from Lieutenant-General Ramsay to receive the French prisoners and put them aboard, as said is, and if he fails recall the former order appointing him to be shipped aboard and carried to New­castle in respect of the premises.

 

State Papers, Domestic, Naval (Entry Book), P.R.O.

Admiralty Office.    14th September, 1704.

 

Rt. Honourable,—We have received your letter of yesterday's date, and according to your desire therein send you enclosed a copy of the instructions which are given to the commanders of all her Majesty's ships for their government in making the ships of foreign princes or states strike in her Majesty's seas, and we are to acquaint you that we do not know of any precedents of English men-of-war meeting with Scots men-of-war at sea.

We are Rt. Honourable,

Your most humble servants,

D. MITCHELL,

GEO. CHURCHILL,

J. BRYDGE.  

Mr. Secretary Hedges.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XX.

Her Majesty's Commission to          , Captain of the Ship the Nonsuch.

 

ANNE R.—Anne by the grace of God Queen of Scotland, England, France and Ireland, Defender of the faith &c: To all and sundry Kings, Princes, Dukes . . . [same as in com­mission to Captain John Stewart, commander of the Alexander Gaily of Queensferry at p. 280] . . . to be captain of the said ship Nonsuch of thirty tons burden or thereabouts and carrying six pieces of ordnance ... [as at pp. 281-2]: And particularly you are hereby injoined and required to keep an exact journal of your pro­ceedings, and therein to take notice of all prizes which shall be taken by you, the nature of such prizes with the time and place of their being taken and the value of them as near as you can judge, as also of the station, motion and strength of the enemy as well as you can discover by the best intelligence you can get : Of all which you are from time to time to transmit an account to our Privy Council of our said kingdom or their clerks, and to keep a correspondence with them by all opportunities that shall present : Requesting you and everyone of you &c. [as at p. 283]. Given under our royal hand and signet at our Court at St. James's the 5th day of January 1704-5 and of our reign the third year.

By her Majesty's command,

ROXBURGHE. [ John, Earl of .Roxburghe, was appointed Joint Secretary of State for Scotland along with the Earl of Seafield on 17th October, 1704.—State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, vol. xx, pp. 40 and 48].

 

Ibidem.

The Queen's Letter to the Council recommending to them to give Proper Instructions to the. Captain of the Nonsuch.

 

Anne R.—Right trusty and right well-beloved cousin and counsellor ... we greet you well. Whereas we have granted commission to Captain commander of the ship Nonsuch, to fit out to sea in warlike manner his said ship, and to take and apprehend the ships and goods belonging to the French and Spanish Kings now at war with us, and the ships and goods of their subjects and inhabitants in their dominions and territories ; we therefore recommend to you to give the said Captain                  such instructions of behaviour in the execution of this our commis­sion as are usual and proper in such cases ; and that you cause him give security for his faithful observance of the same accordingly : So we bid you heartily farewell.     Given at our Court at St. James's the 5th day of January, 1704-5, and of our reign the 3rd year.

By her Majesty's command,

ROXBURGHE.

 

 

Historical MSS. Commission, Seafield MSS., Fourteenth Report, App. Ill, p. 220. *[See also State Papers {Scotland) Warrant Books, vol. xx, pp. 216-7. ]                        

M. Van Vrijberge, Dutch Ambassador at the English Court, to Queen Anne.

 

That he had received instructions to request from her Majesty the release of the vessel named the Catherine, belonging to James Meyers merchant at Rotterdam. It had been returning from the Canaries laden with wine, and though furnished with a passport of ' LL. HH. PP.' was seized towards the end of August last by Captain Gordon and taken to Scotland. He will not repeat the reasons urged on behalf of the owner, but he cannot refrain from pointing out that the procedure of her Majesty's subjects in Scotland seemed very rude, to pretend to maintain free trade with both the enemies and the allies of her Majesty, and yet to seize this ship under safe conduct. He therefore begs her Majesty to order the release of the Catherine forthwith.

London.    I7~28th January, 1705.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    20th February, 1705.

Instructions to Captain Campbell.

 

By the Lords of her Majesty's most honourable Privy Council, the instructions following are given to Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle in prosecution and for better executing his com­mission, and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril.

1.         You are to be in readiness and sail from New Port, Glasgow, to the mouth of Clyde against the tenth day of  March next to come, wind and weather serving.

2.         And from thence you are to cruise between the Isle of Tarrie [Tory Is] and the Mull of Galloway, and from that the length of Lambie Island near Dublin, and to  take and have under   your   protection and convoy all vessels and ships belonging to her Majesty's subjects that shall fall in your way in that cruise, and conduct them safely to their respective ports.

3.          You   are   to   defend   yourself   and   ships under   your   convoy   against   all   her   Majesty's enemies,  whether French or Spaniards,  and all others   with   whom  her   Majesty  is   at   present engaged  in  war,  who   shall  presume to attack you, to the utmost of your power, and to endeavour by all your force to subdue them, and bring them in as prize and to be declared such.

4.          You  are  also,  as you  find  occasion  and yourself in condition, to attack and set upon all her   Majesty's   enemies,   and   endeavour  by  all your force to subdue them and seize their ships and goods.

5.         You are also to search all ships going to or coming from   France and Spain or any of the dominions belonging to the said kingdoms, and if you find them carrying contraband goods to any enemies' countries, to seize them, their ships and whole goods, and bring them in as prize.

6.          You are to observe the time of your cruising and all other articles contained in your contract with the Lords of her Majesty's Treasury.

7.                        You are carefully from time to time to advise us of all that occurs during your cruise.

 

Given at Edinburgh the twentieth day of February, 1705 years.    (Sic subscribitur)

TWEEDDALE, Cancel., I.P.D.

 

Ibidem

Edinburgh.    8th March, 1705.

By the Lords of her Majesty's most honourable Privy Council of Scotland.

The instructions following are given to Captain Thomas Gordon commander of her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary, in prosecution and for better executing of his commission, and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril :—

1.      You are immediately to sail to the northward, take under your convoy all vessels bound that way, and carefully see each of them safely into their   respective   harbours   so   far   as   Orkney. Then you are to return and call along the coast for all vessels bound to the Firth.

2.      If no  vessels  be  ready  to  come  out  of harbours when you call, you are to cruise ten days between Tynemouth[Usually written as Tinmouth] Bar and Orkney, and call  at  Tynemouth what vessels  may be there bound to the Firth, whom you are carefully to see within the  Island of May.    Then  you are to return to the northward as far as Orkney, and bring along with you all vessels who are ready.

3.      At any time when you come to Leith road, if there be any ships bound to London, you are carefully to see them the length of Tynemouth Bar, and bring from thence all ships as you are appointed above, all which you are to observe during the time the ship is kept in pay.

4.                        You are carefully from time to time to advise us of all that occurs during your cruise.

5.         You are to defend yourself and all ships under   your   convoy   against   all  her   Majesty's enemies,   whether   French   or   Spanish   and   all others  with  whom  her  Majesty  is  at   present engaged in war, who shall presume to attack you, to the utmost of your power, and to endeavour by all your force to subdue them and make and bring them in as prize to be declared such.

6.         You  are  also,   as  you find occasion  and yourself in condition, to attack and set upon all her Majesty's said enemies, and endeavour by all your force to subdue them and seize their ships and goods.

7.         You are also to search all ships going to or coming from France or Spain or any of the dominions belonging to the said kingdoms, and if you find them carrying goods to any enemy's country,  to seize them,  their ships and whole goods, and bring them in as prize.

8.         If you find any of our allies who are now in war with France and Spain trading to any of  these  kingdoms, isles   or  dominions thereto belonging, you are to seize them and bring them in as prize.

9.         You are to keep exact journals of all that occurs  during your cruise  and to  observe the time   of   your  cruising,   and  all   other   articles contained in your contract with the Lords of her Majesty's  Treasury.   

 

Given  at  Edinburgh,   the eighth day of March, 1705 years.   (Sic subscribitur)

TWEEDDALE, Cancellor,  I.P.D.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    8th March, 1705.

Recommendation to General Ramsay to send Forces aboard the Royal Mary.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to Lieutenant-General George Ramsay, commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom, to order the same officer, two sergeants, three corporals and one drum and thirty-three soldiers, all the same as near as possible that were on board her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary the last year, to repair to Leith upon the 13th of March instant, and there to be shipped aboard the said ship and man-of-war the Royal Mary, Captain Thomas Gordon, commander, there to continue during his cruise.

 

Ibidem (resume).

Edinburgh.    12th March, 1705.

 

Complaint in a letter by the Council to the Secretary of State of the conduct of the com­mander, Captain Hews, of H.M.S. the Winches­ter, calling at the Forth to embark recruits for Holland, and forcibly stopping and searching Scottish ships lying there, firing at them if they refused to comply with his demands. The complaints of the skippers are enclosed. On being sent for, the captain persistently refused to wait on the Council, but sent his lieutenant, whom the Council retained for a time; but on the captain declaring he would sail without the recruits the Council sent him and some of the crew back and let him go.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    28th March, 1705.

Recommendation to write to Captain Campbell.

The Lord High Chancellor [The Earl of Seafield] having received a letter from Captain Mathew Campbell, com­mander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, and the same being by his Lordship communicated to the Board and read in their presence, the said Lords do hereby recommend to the Lord High Chancellor (in his Lordship's return2 to the foresaid letter) to appoint him to pursue his cruise, conform to his instructions given to him by the said Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council, how soon he hath brought up the ship mentioned in his letter to New Port, Glasgow ; as also to appoint the said Captain Campbell to send in to the Lord High Chancellor to be communicated to the Board a full information of the grounds he hath for bringing up the said ship and of the documents aboard her for seizing thereof.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XX.

The Queen's Letter to the Lords Commissioners of Treasury ordering the Ship Katherine of Rotterdam to be restored or her value, and concerning Dutch ships to be seized.

 

ANNE R.—Right trusty ... we greet you well: Whereas, for maintaining the good understanding that is between us and our allies the States General of the United Provinces, we have mutually agreed that  there  be  no  seizure  or confiscation made of any ships of each nation trading to France and Spain or their dominions notwithstanding of the present war, such ships having passes for that end from their respective sovereigns, and have also agreed that such ships as are already taken on either side be restored; and understanding that there was brought into that our kingdom by Captain Thomas Gordon the
ship Katherine of Rotterdam Captain commander, and condemned as lawful prize in
our Court of Admiralty there, and which ship had the said States their pass-—we therefore
authorise and require you to cause return to the said  Captain                  and his  owners the  value of the said ship Katherine and cargo: And you are to make known to our subjects of that our kingdom that all such as have suffered by such confiscations there, that they are to have the like favour of our allies the States, and shall have our royal protection and assistance in their claim of repetition from them. So we bid you heartily farewell. Given at Court at St. James's the 7th day of April, 1705, and of our reign the 4th year.

By her Majesty's command,

AL. WEDDERBURN.

 

Seafield Correspondence (Scottish History Society), p. 391.

London.    12th April, 1705.

For the Earl of Seafield.

 

My Lord,—. . . It was not my fault that the opinion of the Privy Council was not waited for, before orders were given for restoring the Dutch prize, but that being over the next thing necessary  in that matter seems to be the concerting speedily what passports will be sufficient for securing our ships, or reclaiming them if they shall be taken into Holland. . .

AL. WEDDERBURN.

 

Ibidem, pp. 407-8.

 

May it please Your Lordships, [The Scots Privy Council].— . . . This is to advise you that in my station on the twenty-fifth of this instant off Cape Kintyre about three in the morning I espyed a sail, and after a chase from that time till nine of the clock at night I came up with her and found her a French priva­teer, and after some small conflict she surrendered, having killed his lieutenant and wounded several of his men.    She is a privateer of eight guns, sixty-two men—nothing else on board but some few provisions and two ransomers,  one for the Dublin packet boat, and the other for a Greenock barque.    Having come  in  here  with  the  prize and prisoners, I have sent this express to your Lordships to know what further is to be done with the prize and prisoners.    If they are to be sent to Glasgow they can be securely sent there by the men I have on board, I mean the prisoners. There is a necessity for haleing my ship ashore to be cleaned, but I shall make all the dispatch I can to be ready to wait your Lordship orders. I am at a considerable charge in maintaining the prisoners, which I persuade myself your Lordships will have regard to.

I am . . .

Mathew Campbell.

Greenock Road, on board the Dumbarton. 28th May, 1705.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Holyrood House.    30th May, 1705.

Recommendation to the Commissioner[John, Duke of Argyle] to write to the Queen anent French Prisoners.

The Lord High Commissioner having produced to the Board a letter directed to his Grace from Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, giving an account that the said captain had taken off the Cape of Kintyre a French privateer con­sisting of eight guns and sixty-two men aboard her, and the same being read, the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to his Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner to lay the same before her Majesty, that her Majesty in her royal wisdom may give further directions how the prisoners shall be disposed of, and whether the said prisoners shall be sent to or allowed to go into England, and in that case that her Majesty may give orders to receive them, or that the said prisoners may be set at liberty for returning to France with their first convenience.

Warrant to Captain Campbell to transmit the French Prisoners to Glasgow Tolbooth.

 His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council appoint and ordain Captain Mathew Campbell, com­mander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, to conduct and carry the crew of the French privateer taken by him prisoners safely to Glasgow, and deliver them to the magistrates of the said burgh to be by them detained prisoners in their tolbooth till further orders, and to transmit to the Council the documents and instructions aboard the said ship for declaring her prize.  

Warrant to the Magistrates of Glasgow to receive and Aliment the French Prisoners.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby appoint and ordain the magistrates of Glasgow to receive from Captain Mathew Campbell, com­mander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, the crew of the French privateer lately taken by the said captain, and to keep and detain them in sure frrmance till further orders of Council thereanent, and to maintain and aliment them as follows, viz., the captain at ten shillings Scots a day, the mate at six shillings Scots a day, and each of the rest of the crew at four shillings Scots a day, and recommend to the Lords Com­missioners of her Majesty's Treasury to cause repayment thereof to be made to the said magistrates accordingly.

 

Ibidem.

Holyrood House.    30th May, 1705.

Warrant to continue the Cruise of the two Frigates.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury to continue the cruise of her Majesty's two frigates the Royal Mary and the Dumbarton Castle, commanded by Captain Thomas   Gordon   and Captain Mathew Campbell, till the tenth day of July next to come, with and under the instructions formerly given to them.

 

Ibidem.

Holyrood House.    12th June, 1705.

Warrant to the Magistrates of Glasgow to liberate the Captain of a French Privateer from Prison.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby give order and warrant to the magistrates of Glasgow to set the captain of the French privateer lately taken by Captain Mathew Campbell at liberty forth of their tolbooth, with liberty to him to go up and down the said town of Glasgow and two miles round the same, upon his giving his parole of honour that he shall keep and not exceed the bounds of his said confinement till further orders of Council thereanent.

 

Ibidem.

Holyrood House.    19th June, 1705.

Act dismissing the French Prisoners.

Anent the petition given in and presented to his Grace John Duke of Argyll, her Majesty's High Commissioner, and remanent Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council by the magistrates and merchants of the town of Aberdeen, shewing that where three ships belonging to the town of Aberdeen had lately unfortunately happened to be seized by the French and Ostenders in their voyage   homeward   bound   from   Campheir   to Scotland, and seeing that Captain Gordon and Captain Campbell, commanders of two of her Majesty's ships, have also each of them seized a French or Ostender privateer, and that the good treatment of the Scots men taken doth depend upon what treatment the French or Ostenders meet with here, and that the detaining the Scots long in France may contribute very much to the hindrance of our trade and the detaining of the seamen, whereas the setting of the French at liberty upon their enacting themselves to procure the same favour to Scots prisoners and giving a declaration under their hands of their good treatment here may procure the same favour to those seized in the ships belonging to the said town of Aberdeen, and therefore craving to the effect aftermentioned, as the said petition bears, his Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council, having considered the petition given in to them by the magistrates and merchants of the town of Aberdeen, and the same being read in their presence, his Grace and the said Lords do hereby appoint and ordain the prisoners taken aboard the Ostend privateer commanded by Jean Sable, captain, and taken by Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of the Royal Mary, to be instantly dismissed and set at liberty, upon the said captain and prisoners their giving a declaration subscribed under their hand that they were taken aboard the said Ostend privateer and were instantly dismissed, as said is, in expectation that the subjects of this kingdom who are or shall be taken prisoners in France or the Spanish Netherlands shall be used and treated in the like manner.

 

Seafield Correspondence (Scottish History Society), p. 412.

For the Earl of Seafield Lord Chancellor.

 

My Lord,—. . . I shall observe what your Lordship directs concerning the French prisoners taken by Captain Campbell, and by next post shall, I hope, receive her Majesty's commands and transmit them to your Lordship. . . .

DAVID NAIRNE. [Sir David Nairne was appointed Under Secretary of State for Scotland early in 1703.   He was superseded on 10th June, 1704.  On 2nd May, 1705, he was appointed Secretary-Depute.—State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, vol. xxi.]

Whitehall.    19th June, 1705.

 

Ibidem, pp. 412-3.

For the Earl of Seafield Lord Chancellor.

 

My Lord,—I told your Lordship in my last that I should by this day receive her Majesty's commands concerning the French prisoners taken by Captain Campbell, and accordingly I went to Windsor for that end, and am just returned. She was pleased to ask me if any such case had occurred before. I told her Majesty that there had, when I had the honour formerly to serve,  [ On 10th June, 1704, a warrant was issued to Al. Wedderburn, on the narrative that the Queen had laid aside Sir David Nairne, to officiate as Under Secretary in the absence of the Secretary of State for Scotland.—State Papers (Scotland)  Warrant Books, vol. xx.] and that then I was commanded to attend the Secretary of State here and the Com­missioners of transportation, who took the same method of exchanging as with those taken and brought to any remote part of England or in Ireland; and thus her Majesty has ordered me to apply again, which I shall do the morrow, and I doubt not but they will do as they did before. In the meantime I believe they will expect a more particular account, for your Lordship neither tells the number nor the several station or ranks, which I remember your Lordship did formerly, and it was demanded by the Commissioners of transportation. As for the expense of keeping them, my Lord Treasurer[Lord Godolphin]. was pleased to tell me that those who were exchanged for them were to balance it, but whether the sum will be so considerable as to oblige anybody to solicit for it I know not. .  . .

David Nairne.

Whitehall.    21st June, 1705.

 

Ibidem, p. 414.

For the Earl of Seafield Lord Chancellor.

 

My Lord,— . . . Sir Charles Hedges has con­certed the exchange of the prisoners there with the Commissioners here, who have agreed to receive them at Newcastle as them did the former; and the Commissioners want only now to adjust with the Admiralty concerning the ships who are to receive them, and which they assure me shall be done in time for me to advise of it against next post. . . .

David Nairne.

Whitehall.    23rd June, 1705.

 

Ibidem, pp. 415-6.

For the Earl of Seafield.

 

My Lord,— . . . The country expects the Parliament will take into consideration the guard­ing our coasts, so much infested at present by privateers of such numbers and force that Captain Gordon alone is not able to deal with them; and as he hath done very good service already and saved much money to the nation, so if he had the Royal William added (for which the Parlia­ment should give a fund) he would act a great deal more for the honour of the nation, as well as the safety of its trade. . . .

Jo. Buchan. [Colonel John Buchan was a brother of the Jacobite General who was defeated at Cromdale.]

Carnebulg [Aberdeenshire].    25th June, 1705.

 

 

Ibidem, pp. 419-20.

For the Earl of Seafield Lord Chancellor.

 

My Lord,— . . . My Lord Treasurer thinks it will make a great noise here, and may be of ill consequence the letting these prisoners be dis­missed that were taken by Captain Gordon with the Duke of Bavaria's commission. It would have been yet better if they had been the sailors of a merchant, but a privateer is an open offensive enemy, and to think that the French will dismiss any prisoners of the Queen's subjects, when they have not enough to exchange for their own, is much to be doubted. I told what your Lordship said for the doing it, but I find it does not satisfy, and the less that, upon the first application here, care was taken to ease the Queen of those prisoners taken by Captain Campbell. I wish that this method may not make the Commissioners here distinguish between Scots and English in the ex­change hereafter, which they never did hitherto.

David Nairne.

Whitehall.    28th June, 1705.

 

State Papers Domestic, Naval (Entry Book), P.R.O.

Extract of a letter from Colonel Villiers dated Tynemouth Castle, 3rd July, 1705.

 

I received your order for to receive such prisoners as should be sent from Scotland, and to deliver them to the commander-in-chief of the convoy for the colliers, that he may carry them to the Nore ; and I hearing that there was some taken up at Newcastle so I sent yesterday to Newcastle to the Commissioners of the sick and woundeds' deputy who hath 34 prisoners in his custody at Newcastle, which he will send me down this morning, and I will deliver them to the commander of the convoy to the Nore. There was about ten more of them that have made their escape. They were not sent as prisoners from Scotland, but had passes, and I have here enclosed a copy of one of the passes.

 

Copy of the Pass.

To all whom it may concern,

These are to certify that Gerard Van Stable, Pieter Van Stable, Francais Roderigo, Dominicus Pintifliur were belonging to the St. Trinity, a pri­vateer of Ostend, Captain Jean Sable commander, taken by me aboard her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary, her Majesty's High Commissioner and the Right Honourable the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council having thought fit to give them liberty to go home or where they please, it is desired that they may go in pursuit of their voyage homeward without hindrance or molesta­tion. Given under my hand and seal aboard her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary in Leith road 20th June, 1705.

Thomas Gordon.

 

Ibidem.

Admiralty Office.    6th July, 1705.

 

Sir,—Having received a letter from Colonel Villiers, governor of Tynemouth, touching French prisoners at war travelling from Scotland to Newcastle with passes, I am commanded by the Prince to send you an extract of his said letter together with a copy of the pass to be laid before the Right Honourable Mr. Secretary Hedges.

I am, Sir, Your most humble servant,

J. BURCHETT.

 

Seafield Correspondence (Scottish History Society), pp. 421-2.

For the Earl of Seafield Lord Chancellor.

My Lord,— ... I wrote to your Lordship formerly of the inconveniency of letting those prisoners loose about the country, who were taken by Captain Gordon, and the copy herewith of a letter wrote to the Committee for exchange of prisoners, and which they showed to me, will show your Lordship the hazards that the poor men themselves run. They might have been indeed sent away without formal treaties for ransome, as they do here with the Ostenders, but to let them run loose in the country may be a means to get them knocked down by every country fellow that has an aversion to a Frenchman. . . .

David Nairne.

Whitehall.    7th July, 1705.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland (resume).

Holyrood House.    1st August, 1705.

 

Warrants issued by the Council to the magis­trates of Glasgow to release the French prisoners ; to General George  Ramsay, commander-in-chief of H.M. forces, to send soldiers to Glasgow to receive them and convey them to the tolbooths of Canongate and Leith ; and to the magistrates of the Canongate and Leith, and the keepers of their tolbooths to receive the said Frenchmen, and detain them till further orders.

 

Correspondence of Colonel Nathaniel Hooke (Roxburghe Club).

 

While I stayed with my Lady Erroll, our frigate [the Audacious] was within musket shot of the castle. The day after my arrival Mr. Gordon captain of a Scotch frigate commissioned to guard the coast appeared in the southward. My Lady Erroll bid me be under no apprehensions, and sent a gentleman in a cutter to desire the captain to take another course, with which he complied. This lady has gained him over, and as often as he passes and repasses that way he takes care to give her notice. I have brought with me one of his letters as a proof of his good disposition. Since that time there are signals agreed upon between him and Mr. Carron,[Commander of the French  ship Audacious.] that they may avoid each other.

 

Ibidem.

Off Aberdeen,    11th August, 1705.

Letter to Lady Erroll.

 

Right Honourable Madam,—Unexpectedly I passed the Slains  [Slains Castle, on the east coast of Aberdeenshire, the seat of the Earl of Erroll and Lady Erroll.] this morning before day with some vessels under my convoy bound to Leith. From thence I design for Newcastle. If your Ladyship has any service for me there, honour me with your commands, which shall be punctually observed. It'll be fourteen days before I return to the north. I shall trouble your Ladyship with an account of my coming ere I part from Leith. Your Ladyship's most obliged and most humble servant,

Thomas Gordon.

 

Hooke gives a List of the Signals between Captain Gordon ' commanding the ship and M. Carron at the Slains in August, 1705, by the Countess of Err oil's means.'

Carron shall hoist a Holland ensign at the main topmast head (the main top-sail half mast down) and a Scots ensign at the mizen. Captain Gordon shall answer by hoisting the Scots ensign at the main topmast head (his main top-sail half mast down) and a Holland ensign to the mizen peak—and he shall not inquire after, pursue or concern himself with any such ship.

 

Minutes 0f the Privy Council of Scotland.

Holyrood House.    5th September, 1705.

Sailing Orders to Captain Gordon.

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby command and ordain Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's frigate the Royal Mary to sail forthwith and with all speed, wind and weather serving, from Leith to Newcastle, and to take under his convoy the ship belonging to         Tait,  hired by  the  Lords  Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury for trans­porting  and  carrying the French prisoners for present in the tolbooths of Canongate and Leith, and there and at the said port to deliver the said prisoners to the Lord Mayor of Newcastle or to any other person or persons having her Majesty's warrant for receiving of them ; and upon the said Captain Gordon's arrival there his Grace and the said Lords do hereby appoint and ordain to intimate these his orders to the said Lord Mayor and aldermen of Newcastle, or any others having orders and warrant for receiving the said prisoners : And his Grace and the said Lords do hereby appoint and ordain the said Captain Gordon to return from Newcastle to the mouth of Forth, and to bring under his convoy such Scots ships as are homeward bound there, and conduct them safe within the Island [of] May ; and thereafter appoint and ordain him to prosecute his cruise northward, and call at all the harbours and sea­port towns for ships bound to Leith, and receive them under his convoy thither.

 

Order to the Magistrates of Canongate and Leith to deliver French Prisoners to Captain Gordon.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby appoint and ordain the whole French prisoners, who are lying in the tolbooths of Canon­gate and Leith, except the master and nine of his men who are to continue in prison aye and until Sir John Shaw's men that are prisoners in France be set at liberty, and have a sufficient and valid passport to return home, and that the same be notified to the Privy Council, and also except La Grandure and La Peine, two of the said prisoners who, by former ordinance of Council are appointed to be set at liberty, to be shipped aboard of Tait his ship lying at Leith to be by him carried to Newcastle, and for that effect appoint and ordain the magistrates of Canongate and Leith and keepers of their tolbooths to deliver the persons of the whole French prisoners in their custody and tolbooths, excepting as above, to Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's frigate the Royal Mary or to those having his orders to receive them off their hands, and put them aboard the said ship and that without payment of any house dues ; and appoint and ordain the said magistrates to keep and detain the said master and his nine men in their tolbooths aye and until further orders of Council thereanent.

 

Ibidem (resume).

Holyrood House.    8th September, 1705.

Mitchell Godett, captain of the French privateer taken by Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of H.M. ship, the Dumbarton "Castle, having represented that he and nine of his men are ordained to be kept in prison until John Adams, master, Patrick Mudie, John Carr, John McKearie, James Shearer, William Ritchie, Robert Crone, Archibald Miller, William Rodger and Mathew Scott, all Scotsmen, now prisoners in Dinan in France, be set at liberty, with a passport to return home, and that he is desirous to return to France to effect this, promising also either to accomplish their release or to return and re-enter as a prisoner in Scotland within three months, the Council grant him their passport under their cachet to proceed to France for this end.

 

The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, Vol. XI, p. 244.

8th September, 1705.

 

Moved that another month's supply be granted for payment, inter alia, for outrigging her Majesty's ship the Royal William, and for maintaining two birlines to be kept upon the West coast for pre­venting the importation of Irish victual and other prohibited goods. . . . Carried approve . . .

 

Ibidem.

8th September, 1705.

 

Ordered that the royal burghs outrig the frigates and two birlines with all convenience, and recommended to the Lords of Treasury to assign so much of the said month's supply as shall be disbursed by them for these ends, as also recommended to the Lords of Treasury to assign so much of the said month's supply to the above persons as will satisfy the respective sums granted to them by the Parliament; and the Act of Supply having received some other amend­ments it was put to the vote : Approve the Act or not, and carried approved.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Holyrood House.    26th September, 1705.

Sailing Orders to Captain Gordon.

 

His Grace, her Majesty's High Commissioner, and Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby give order and warrant to Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary, forthwith and without delay to sail from the road of Leith to Tynemouth, and receive under his convoy such Scots ships as are outward bound thither, and conduct them safe to the said port, and appoint and ordain the said Captain Thomas Gordon immediately to return and bring under his convoy such Scots ships as are homeward bound, and conduct them safe within the Island of May ; and recommend the said Captain Gordon to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury for his payment accordingly.

 

Ibidem.

Holyrood House.    2nd October, 1705.

Warrant to Captain Gordon to sail to Scarborough.

 

His Grace her Majesty's High Commissioner, arid Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby permit and allow Captain Thomas Gordon, com­mander of her Majesty's frigate the Royal Mary, to sail from Tynemouth to Scarborough in case the ships that he is to convoy from Tynemouth within the Island [of] May be not come that length.

 

State Papers (Scotlard) Warrant Books, Vol. XXI, No. 110.

Commission to Captain Thomas Gordon to be Commander of the ship Royal William.

 

Anne R.—Anne by the grace of God Queen of Scotland, England, France, and Ireland, De­fender of the faith etc : To our trusty and well-beloved Captain Thomas Gordon greeting. We do by these presents constitute and appoint you to be commander of our ship the Royal William; willing and requiring you forthwith to go on board and take upon you the charge and command of captain in her accordingly, charging strictly and commanding all the officers, seamen and soldiers belonging to the said ship, to behave themselves in their several stations and employments with all respect and obedience unto you their said captain : And you are likewise to observe and execute as well the instruc­tions herewith to you delivered by our Privy Council of our said kingdom of Scotland, as what further orders and directions you shall from time to time receive from us or them or any other your superior officer for our service wherein you are not to fail, as you will answer the contrary at your peril. And for your so doing these presents, being recorded in the books of our Privy Council and to continue until recalled, shall be to you a sufficient warrant. Given under our royal hand and signet at our Court at St. James's the 7th day of November, 1705, and of our reign the 4th year.

By her Majesty's command,

MAR. [John, Earl of Mar, was appointed Joint Secretary of State for Scotland on 29th September, 1705.    He led the Jacobites in 1715]

 

Ibidem.

 

Commission to James Hamilton of Orbieston younger, to be commander of the ship the Royal Mary. Given at St. James's the 7th day of November, 1705, and of her Majesty's reign the 4th year.

MAR.

 

Minutes 0f the Privy Council of Scotland (resume).

Edinburgh.    13th December, 1705.

 

Captain Godet having, according to his promise, obtained the release of the Scotsmen imprisoned in France, the Lords on the petition of Julian Godet, Pieter Bonhomme and other six French prisoners kept as hostages, and on receipt of a certificate signed by John Baptista Lempereur, one of the French King's councillors, commissioner of marine affairs and governor in the jurisdiction of St. Malo, that the Scotsmen have been released, they appoint the magistrates of Canongate and Leith to set the French prisoners at liberty without payment of any house dues ; and grant them their protection to take them home.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XXI, No. 139.

Commission to   [See commission dated 12th March, 1706, to David Prescio.]   to be first Lieutenant of the Ship Royal William.

 

Anne R.—Anne by the grace of God Queen of Scotland, England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the faith &c : To our trusty and well-beloved                            greeting. We do by these presents constitute and appoint you to be first lieutenant of our ship the Royal William, willing and requiring you forthwith to go on board and take upon you the charge and command of first lieutenant in her accordingly, charging strictly and commanding all the officers, seamen and soldiers belonging to the said ship to behave themselves in their several stations and employ­ments with all respect and obedience unto you their said first lieutenant, as you are likewise to observe and execute as well the instructions herewith delivered unto you by our Privy Council of Scotland, as what further orders and directions you shall from time to time receive from us or them, or any other your superior officer for our service, wherein you are not to fail as you will  answer the contrary at your peril: And for your so doing these presents being recorded in the books of our Privy Council, and to continue until recalled, shall be to you a sufficient warrant. Given under our royal hand and signet at our Court at St. James's the 22nd day of December, 1705, and of our reign the 4th year.

By her Majesty's command,

LOUDOUN. [ Hugh, Earl of Loudoun, was appointed Joint Secretary of State for Scotland with the Marquess of Annandale in June 1705.]

 

Ibidem, Vol. XXI, No. 140.

 

Commissions[Completed on 12th March, 1706.] [in same form as the above No.139]  to                         to be second lieutenant of the Royal William ; to                        to be first lieutenant  of the Royal  Mary;   to                   to be second lieutenant of the Royal Mary ;    to to be first lieutenant of the Dumbarton Castle;   to                     to be second lieutenant  of the Dumbarton Castle.

All these five commissions were passed  and dated at St. James's the 22nd of December, 1705, and of her Majesty's reign the 4th year.

By her Majesty's command,

LOUDOUN.

 

Ibidem, Vol. XXI, No. 160.

The  Queen's  letter to the Lords  of Treasury ordering the Royal William to be fitted out.

 

Anne R.—Right trusty ... we greet you well. Whereas for preventing the importation of Irish victual and other prohibited goods our Parliament last sessions gave a fund for outrigging our ship the Royal William and ordered that the royal burghs should  outrig the frigates and birlines with all conveniency, and recommended to the Lords of our Treasury to assign so much to them of the said fund as shall be disbursed by them for that end, notwithstanding of which order in  Parliament we are informed that the royal burghs do decline to advance what money is necessary for the foresaid purposes :   And We taking into our royal consideration how necessary it is for true security of trade that the said ship be speedily outrigged and sent to sea, and that seeing the royal burghs, as being the chief traders, will reap the greatest benefit thereby, we think it  most  just  and reasonable  that  they should advance what money is necessary for that effect in pursuance of the order of Parliament :  Therefore it is our will and pleasure, and we hereby authorise and require you to call the   royal   burghs and signify this our pleasure to them, and that we expect their ready compliance therewith;    and on their so doing, you are to assign to them so much of the month's supply granted by Parliament for the above uses, as shall be disbursed by them for those ends.    But if they refuse, you are to acquaint  us therewith, that  we may give such further orders as are necessary thereanent.    For doing of which this shall be your warrant.    So we   bid   you   heartily   farewell.    Given   at   our Court at St. James's the 31st day of January, 1705-6, and of our reign the 4th year.

By her Majesty's command,

MAR.

 

State Papers, Domestic, Naval (Entry Book), P.R.O.

At the Court at Kensington, the 14th of February, 1705-6.

Present: The Queen's most Excellent Majesty in Council.

Upon reading this day at the Board a memorial from the Council of his Royal Highness, Prince George of Denmark, Lord High Admiral in the words following viz. :

' There being reason to apprehend that there will be want of men to enable the fleet to proceed timely to sea the next year as the service may require it, we do by virtue of the power and authority given us by his Royal Highness humbly propose unto her Majesty that she will be pleased to recommend it to the Government of Scotland to provide and send to Leith to be put on board the ships of war and other vessels, as will be to that purpose ordered thither, such a number of able seamen as can be got in that kingdom for the service of her Majesty's fleet by or before the 15th of April next.'

The old bounty money, forty shillings, recom­mended to be paid to each able seaman sent by the Council of Scotland.

Same approved.

 

Ibidem (resume).

 

On 23rd February, 1705-6, J. Burchett writes from the Admiralty Office inquiring of Mr. Secre­tary Hedges ' what directions are given or measures taken in relation to the getting seamen from Scotland in order to his Highness sending ships and money thither, according as was done the last time men were had from thence.'

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    7th March, 1706.

Sailing Orders for Captain Thomas Gordon.

 

By the Lords of her Majesty's most honourable Privy Council of the kingdom of Scotland, the instructions following are given to Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's ship the Royal William, and commander of the Scots frigates, in prosecution and for better executing of his commission, and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril.

First, you are at and against the first day of April next to come to sail from the road of Leith to the northward in company with the Royal Mary, commanded by Captain James Hamilton, who is to receive orders from you from time to time as commodore, and take under your convoy all vessels bound that way, and carefully see each of them safe into their respective harbours so far as Orkney. Then you are to return and call along the coast for all vessels bound to the Firth.

Secondly, if no vessels be ready to come out of harbours when you call, you are to cruise ten days between Tynemouth Bar and Orkney, and call at Tynemouth for what vessels may be there bound for the Firth, whom you are carefully to see within the Island of May. Then you are to return to the northward as far as Orkney and bring along with you all vessels that are ready.

Thirdly, at any time when you come to Leith road, if there be ships bound for London you are carefully to see them the length of Tynemouth Bar and bring from thence all ships as you are appointed above, all which you are to observe during the time the ship is kept in pay.

Fourthly, you are carefully from time to time to advise us of all that occurs during your cruise.

Fifthly, you are to defend yourself and all ships under your convoy against all her Majesty's enemies,   whether   French   or   Spanish,   and   all others with whom her Majesty is at present engaged in war, who shall presume to attack you, to the utmost of your power, and to endeavour by all your force to subdue them and make and bring them in as prize to be declared such.

Sixthly, you are also, as you find occasion and yourself in condition, to attack and set up all her Majesty's said enemies and endeavour by all your force to subdue them and seize their ships and goods.

Seventhly, you are also to search all ships going to or coming from France or Spain or any of the dominions belonging to the said kingdoms, and if you find them carrying contraband goods to any enemy's country, to seize them, their ships and whole goods, and bring them in as prize.

Eighthly, you are to keep exact journals of all that occurs during your cruise, and to observe the time of your cruising, and all other articles contained in your contract with the Lords of her Majesty's Treasury.

Given at Edinburgh the 7th day of March, 1706.

 

Sailing Orders and Instructions for Captain Mathew Campbell.

 

By the Lords of her Majesty's most honourable Privy Council of the kingdom of Scotland the instructions following are given to Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, in prosecution and for better executing of his commission, and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril.

First, you are to be in readiness and sail from New Port Glasgow to the mouth of Clyde against the  fifteenth  day  of  March  instant  wind  and weather serving.

Secondly, and from thence you are to cruise between the Isle of Tarrie and the Mull of Gallo­way, and from that the length of Lambie Island near Dublin, and to take and have under your protection and convoy all vessels and ships belonging to her Majesty's subjects that shall fall in your way in that cruise, and conduct them safely to their respective ports.

Thirdly, &c. as in the instructions fifthly-eighthly given to Captain Gordon.

Given at Edinburgh this seventh day of March, 1706.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    7th March, 1706.

Sailing Orders and Instructions for Captain James Hamilton.

 

By the Lords of her Majesty's most honourable Privy Council of the kingdom of Scotland, the instructions following are given to Captain James Hamilton, commander of her Majesty's ship the Royal Mary in prosecution and for better executing his commission, and to be by him punctually observed upon his peril.

First you are at and against the fourteenth day of March instant to sail from the road of Leith to the northward and take under your convoy all vessels bound that way, and carefully to see each of them safe into their harbours so far as Orkney. Then you are to return, between and the first day of April next to come, to the road of Leith, wind and weather serving, at which time you are to go northward in company with the Royal William, commanded by Captain Thomas Gordon, and to receive orders from him from time to time as commander ; and in your first return to the road of Leith you are to call along the coast for vessels bound to the Firth.

Secondly &c, as in Captain Gordon's instruc­tions.

Given at Edinburgh the seventh day of March, 1706.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    12th March, 1706.

Act appointing the Officers of the Scots Frigates to take the Oaths.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby appoint the captains, lieutenants and masters of the Scots frigates to qualify themselves to her Majesty by swearing the oath of allegiance and subscribing the same with the assurance before a privy councillor.

 

Ibidem (resume).

Edinburgh.    12th March, 1706.

Commissions to David Prescio to be lieutenant of H.M. Ship, the Royal William ; to William Hay to be lieutenant of the Royal Mary; to George Milne to be master of the Royal William ; and to Patrick Hay to be master of the Royal Mary, in the usual form, all dated 12th March, 1706.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    12th March, 1706.

Warrant for putting a party of soldiers aboard the Royal William.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to David, Earl of Leven, [David, second son of George, Earl of Melvill, succeeded on the death of the Duke of Rothes (27th July, 1681) as third Earl of Leven. He fought in Scotland and in Ireland on the Revolu­tion side, and afterwards served in Flanders. In 1703 he was promoted Major-General. In March, 1706, he was appointed Lieutenant-General and Commander-in-Chief in Scotland. On his father's death, in 1707, the two earldoms were conjoined in him.] commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom, to order a party of forty-two sentinels (good and sufficient men) duly commanded by one officer, with three sergeants, three corporals and one drum, to repair to Burntisland upon the last day of March instant, and there to be shipped aboard her Majesty's ship and man-of-war the Royal William, Captain Thomas Gordon, com­mander, there to continue during his cruise.

 

Warrant for putting a party of soldiers aboard the Dumbarton Castle.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to David, Earl of Leven, commander-in-chief of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom, to order a party of twenty foot sentinels (good and sufficient men) duly commanded by one officer, with a sergeant, two corporals and one drum, to repair to New Port Glasgow, upon the                day of March instant, and there to be shipped aboard her Majesty's ship and man-of-war the Dumbarton Castle, Captain Mathew Campbell, commander, there to continue during his cruise.

 

Ibidem.

Captain Hamilton qualified to her Majesty.

 

Oath of allegiance sworn and the same with the assurance signed by Captain James Hamilton, captain of the Royal Mary, and William Hay, his lieutenant, and Patrick Hay, master of the said ship, in presence of her Majesty's Advocate ; and the same being reported to the Council was appointed to be recorded and put up among the oaths.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    12th March, 1706.

Letter from the Queen for Levying Seamen.

 

Letter from her Majesty to the Council anent listing of seamen to serve aboard her Majesty's Royal Navy read and ordered to be recorded. The Council recommend to Sir James Steuart, her Majesty's Advocate, to draw a proclamation in the terms of the foresaid letter and former pro­clamations of Council anent levying of seamen for serving her Majesty in the English fleet.

(Sic suprascribitur) Anne R.—Right trusty and right well-beloved cousin and councillor, &c, we greet you well. Whereas we have ordered one of our men-of-war to convoy what Scots ships are now here into the road of Leith, and having great occasion at this time for seamen, we have given directions to the captain of our said man-of-war to lie some days in Leith road and to receive what seamen will voluntarily enter themselves to serve in our Royal Navy, and for their encourage­ment we have ordered forty shillings sterling to be paid to each seaman at his entry, and from that time they shall have the same pay and entertain­ment that our English seamen do receive ; there­fore it is our will and pleasure and we recommend to your care to fall upon such methods as you judge proper for giving notice to all seamen, that such as are willing to enter into our service on board our fleet may know where to go and list themselves, and you are to give all other encourage­ment and assistance to our said captain for raising seamen that may be consistent with the laws of that our ancient kingdom, giving always special orders for preventing abuses and disorders in making these levies. We have taken care to have our orders to our Admiralty for prohibiting all press masters to press or seize any seamen on board any ships belonging to Scotland duly observed. We doubt not of your care of what we recommend to you, and so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at Kensington the 27th day of February, 1705-6, and of our reign the 4th year.

By her Majesty's command (sicsubscribitur),   

                                                                        Loudoun.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    20th March, 1706.

Act for a voluntary Levy of Seamen.

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council in prosecution of her Majesty's letter directed to them on the 27th of February last, and making mention that one of her men-of-war sent for convoy into the road of Leith is to lie some days there and to receive what seamen will voluntarily enter themselves to serve in the Royal Navy, who for their encouragement are to have forty shillings sterling each seaman at his entry, and from that time the same pay and entertainment that her Majesty's English seamen do receive, and therefore recommending to their Lordships' care to fall upon such methods as they judge proper for giving notice to all seamen, that such as are willing to enter into her Majesty's service on board her fleet may know where to go and list themselves, and to give all other encouragement and assistance to the captain of the said man-of-war for raising seamen that may be consistent with the laws of the kingdom, giving always special order for preventing abuses and disorders in making these levies, do therefore hereby ordain the magistrates of the respective burghs and sea-towns within the firths of Scotland or elsewhere upon any of the coasts thereof, or any other person having warrant from the said captain to beat drums within their said burghs and sea-towns for intimating to all able seamen who voluntarily of their own free consent, given before a magistrate attesting the same, are willing to serve aboard her Majesty's fleet, that they repair to Leith between and the first day of May next to come, and there offer themselves to the said captain or any he shall appoint, upon pay­ment to be made to each of the said seamen of forty shillings sterling of free bounty and levy money before their going aboard of the said man-of-war, and the said captain his engaging that they shall be received into her Majesty's service aboard her fleet, and shall have the same pay and entertainment with her English seamen. And the said Lords of Council ordain all magis­trates and others within the burghs and sea-towns foresaid to give their concurrence to the said captain and such as shall be employed by him for securing the persons of the said seamen, who shall willingly engage and receive payment in manner foresaid upon the said captain's proper charges and expenses : And the said Lords do hereby strictly prohibit and discharge all disorders or abuses to be committed in making the said voluntary levy, but that all concerned keep themselves within the bounds and rules of law, recommending to the committee of Council for pressed men to hear and redress summarily all complaints that shall be made to them in the said matter.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    4th June, 1706.

Recommendation to the Lord Advocate to write for Convoys to Scots Ships in the Baltic.

Sir Robert Forbes[Clerk to the Scots Privy Council. He was also a Judge of the Admiralty Court of Scotland from 30th November, 1699.— State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, vols. xvii and xx.] having represented to the Board that he had received a letter from several skippers and masters of ships at Danzig desiring application to be made to the Council for a warrant to Captain Gordon and Captain Hamilton, commanders of the two Scots frigates, to come sometime in June to Gothenburg to convoy home twenty-five or thirty Scots ships from thence, and the said letter being read, the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby recommend to Sir James Steuart, her Majesty's Advocate, to prepare and bring in to the Council next Council day a letter from their Lordships to the Secretaries of State to be laid before her Majesty, entreating that her Majesty will be pleased to order two English frigates to go in company with one of the Scots frigates to Gothenburg, and to convoy from thence such Scots ships as are there and ready to sail, and to see them safely within the Scots firth.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    6th June, 1706.

Letter from the Council to the Secretary of State for Convoys to Scots ships in the Baltic.

 

Letter from the Council to the Earl of Loudoun, Secretary of State, to be laid before her Majesty for convoys to some Scots ships in the Baltic, read, voted, approven and ordered to be recorded, and recommended to the Earl of Buchan to sign and transmit the same to court, the tenor whereof follows :—

My Lord, there hath been a representation made to the Lords of Privy Council in behalf of a great many Scots masters of ships now abroad in the Baltic that some time in June there may be twenty-five or thirty sail of Scots ships at Gothenburg that will need a convoy for Scotland, and therefore desiring that orders may be given to Captain Gordon and to Captain Hamilton to come that length and convoy them homeward, as the copy of the letter from Danzig in April last to one of the clerks of Council herewith sent bears; whereupon we thought fit that the case should be transmitted to your Lordship to be laid before her Majesty with our opinion, which is that because our frigates cannot be wanting to defend our coasts now in the summer from small privateers that infest us, therefore it may please her Majesty to give her royal orders to the Admiralty of England to send two or three of [her] Majesty's ships  of war  for this  convoy.    My  Lord,  this would be a considerable kindness and advantage to this kingdom and the trade thereof, and there­fore we again recommend it to your Lordship's care, and  whatever  her  Majesty  shall  appoint shall be duly signified to those concerned ;   but this being now the season we expect your Lord­ship's answer with the first convenience.   

Signed in presence by order and  in name of the Lords of her  Majesty's  Privy  Council  by,  my  Lord, your    Lordship's    most    humble    servant    (sicsubscribitur),                                             

BUCHAN.

 

Admiralty I (Captain's Letters), 1833 (P.R.O.).

Royal William lying at Tynemouth Haven.    June, 1706.

 

My Lord,—Having received a letter signed by several masters of our vessels from London, who had put in here and have aboard some valuable goods of the nobility and commissioners of the Union, to give them convoy from this home, I took the first opportunity with Captain Hamilton, commander of the Royal Mary, to comply with their desire.

The wind proved cross most of the way ; and, having sprung the head of my foremast, I was obliged to put into harbour, where, without any previous notice, I was saluted by Captain Jones, commander of the Dunwich, with a sharp great shot. I immediately sent my lieutenant on board him to know the meaning of such rashness. He complained of my spreading a broad pendent[According to the New English Dictionary, the Duke of Wellington in 1813 congratulated a friend on hoisting the ' broad pendent,' and 'pendent' appeared in the Navy List as late as 1882. The official spelling is now ' pendant.'] in English waters, and gave that for the reason. Now, my Lord, I have done nothing in this case but what the English are doing in our rivers,  and what the Dutch do also in their and our waters in company of the Queen's ships.    Captain Jones takes amiss also my firing an evening and morning gun, altho' the English and Dutch do the same when with us, and also the Dutch too in the very Thames ;   and my doing so is only with regard to the ships under my command. Captain  Jones  sends  an  account  of the  affair to the Prince of Denmark by this post, therefore I judged it my duty to inform your Lordship at the same time thereof; wherein I hope I'll be found to have done nothing unwarrantably. My Lord, this case may give occasion to the regulation   of   the   memorial   between   us   and England, as well as foreigners ;   and  I   wish it may, for, my Lord, if we shall happen to meet with English frigates of greater force than ourselves, who  no  doubt will pretend the submission  of striking saluting of which we cannot yield with­out particular instructions, the consequence may prove fatal, which  by  all  means  ought  to  be prevented for the good of both.

I beg, my Lord, now when so many honourable and knowing persons of our country are at London, who can assist in this affair, that the opportunity be not lost of rendering things of this nature distinct between our neighbours and us.

I cannot omit to tell your Lordship on this occasion that Captain Ramsay, commander of the Bon Adventure, who conveyed our recruits to Holland, told me in the road of Leith that he should be sorry of meeting me without the Island of May, since he had orders from the Board of England to make our frigates strike and salute. This makes it still the more necessary that matters be timeously adjusted, and we fully instructed how to  carry out such  cases,  for I am firmly resolved not to yield one jot, while I have the honour to command, without particular orders, which are impatiently waited for by him, who is, my Lord, your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant,

THOMAS  GORDON.

The letter is endorsed by Lord Wemyss[David, Earl of Wemyss, was appointed Lord High Admiral of Scotland on 7th March, 1706—State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, vol. xxi.] the High Admiral for Scotland, with the remark :— ' The expedient proposal is that, being all the Queen's subjects in her own ships, that there be no dissension amongst them, but as one English man of war comes to another.'

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh,   11th July, 1706.

Order for transporting French Prisoners to Glasgow.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby command and ordain Colonel Corbitt forthwith to order a party of her Majesty's forces to repair to Greenock and there receive from Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, the captain, lieutenants and crew of a French privateer lately taken by the said captain, amounting to the number of seventy persons, and to transport them prisoners to the burgh of Glasgow ; and ordain the magistrates of Glasgow to receive them and to keep and detain the said crew prisoners in their tolbooth till further orders of Council; and allow the said magistrates to grant the captain and his two lieutenants the liberty of the town of Glasgow upon their parole of honour not to remove from the said burgh without the Council's leave; and appoint the said prisoners to be alimented as follows, viz., the captain at twelve shillings Scots per day, the two lieutenants at six shillings Scots each per day, and each of the rest of the crew at three shillings Scots per day ; and recommend to the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury to order the said aliment to be punctually paid accordingly.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh,    11th July, 1706.

Act in favour of Captain Thomas Gordon.

Anent the memorial given in and presented to the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council by Captain Thomas Gordon shewing that the Royal William being so very crank that she cannot carry sail without heavier ballast than stones, that therefore it might please the said Lords to give him orders to take aboard those guns which belonged to the Bass, and are now of no manner of use to the government but such as this. If at any time the government think they have use for them they may have them ashore upon twenty-four hours' advertisement. The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council having considered the above memorial given in to them by Captain Thomas Gordon, commander of her Majesty's ship the Royal William, and the same being read in their presence the said Lords do hereby allow the said Captain Thomas Gordon the guns which were formerly in the Bass now lying on the shore of Leith upon his granting receipt therefor to the shoremaster to make the same forthcoming for the use of the government when required thereto.

Ibidem.

Edinburgh,    11th July, 1706.

Remit to the Judges of Admiralty to try and judge a French Privateer and an Irish Ship retaken.

The Marquis of Montrose, Lord President of Privy Council, having represented to the Board that Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of her Majesty's ship the Dumbarton Castle, had acquainted his Lordship that he had taken a French privateer and retaken an Irish ship which the said French privateer had taken and in her custody, the Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby remit to the judges of the High Court of Admiralty to try and judge the said French privateer, and grant warrant to and ordain the said Captain Mathew Campbell to keep and detain the said Irish ship ; and remit to the said judges of the said High Court of Admiralty to cognosce and determine her case conform to the maritime law.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    6th August, 1706.

Act allowing the Captain and Lieutenants of a French Privateer to return to their own country.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby allow the captain and lieutenants of the French privateer lately taken by Captain Mathew Campbell to return to their own country, and recommend to Sir James Steuart, her Majesty's Advocate, to grant them sufficient passes for that effect.

 

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XXII.

The Queen's Letter to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury ordering her share of the Prize taken by Captain Campbell to be given to the Earl of Wemyss.

 

Anne R.—Right trusty, &c., we greet you well. We being informed that Captain Mathew Campbell, commander of our ship the Dumbarton Castle, has in his cruise on the western seas taken a small French privateer, and we being resolved to bestow a mark of our royal favour upon our right trusty and well beloved counsellor David, Earl of Wemyss, Admiral of that our ancient kingdom: Therefore it is our royal will and pleasure, and we hereby authorise and require you to order what proportion or share belongs to us of the said privateer to be given to the said Earl of Wemyss to be disposed of by him and in such manner as he shall think fit, for doing of which this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at Windsor Castle the 12th day of August, 1706, and of our reign the 5th year.

By her Majesty's command,

LOUDOUN.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    15th August, 1706.

Warrant for Liberating the crew of a French Privateer at Liberty.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby allow the crew of a French privateer lately taken by Captain James Hamilton, commander   of   her   Majesty's   ship the  Royal Mary, to return home to their own country, and appoint and ordain the magistrates of Edinburgh and keepers of their tolbooths to set them at liberty forth of the tolbooth of Leith, wherein they are presently imprisoned, three of the said crew at a time, with the interval of twenty-four hours, and appoint the said magistrates to give each of the seamen four pounds Scots for assisting them to return home, as said is ; and recommend to the Lord Advocate to grant them passes as they are liberated, and allow the said magistrates to grant the captain and his lieutenants the liberty of the town of Edinburgh upon their parole of honour not to remove from the said burgh without Council's leave ; and in the mean­time appoint the said prisoners to be alimented as follows, viz., the captain at twelve shillings Scots per day, the two lieutenants at six shillings Scots per day, and each of the rest of the crew at three shillings money foresaid per day ; and declare that the said magistrates shall be re­imbursed of their advances out of the first end of the said privateer when rouped, and that the price thereof is burdened with payment to them accordingly.

 

Ibidem.

Edinburgh.    6th September, 1706.

Permit to the French Officers to go home to their own country.

 

The Lords of her Majesty's Privy Council do hereby allow the officers of the French privateer lately taken by Captain James Hamilton to return to their own country without trouble or molestation, and recommend to the Lord Advocate to grant them sufficient passes for that effect.

 

The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, Vol. XI, p. 319.

9th November, 1706.

 

Then a proposal given in that the one month's cess given for the three frigates and two birlines will not outrig and maintain them con­sidering their bad condition by stormy weather, and considering the establishment and that therefore a half-month's cess be further granted for their outrig and maintainence, which being read the same was ordered to lie upon the table.

 

Minutes of the Privy Council of Scotland.

Edinburgh.    28th March, 1707.

Warrant anent Seamen.

 

Her Majesty's High Commissioner[James, Duke of Queensberry.] and Lords of Privy Council do hereby allow the captain of the English man-of-war, now lying in the road of Leith, to beat drums and put up ' placatts ' for levying such seamen as shall engage with him voluntarily and give their consents before a magistrate, and prohibit and discharge all disorders and abuses to be committed in levying of the said seamen, but that the said captain and those- to be employed by him keep themselves within the bounds prescribed by law.

 

Recommendation to Major-General [R.] Maitland[Sometime governor of Fort William.] to send a Party aboard The Royal William.

 

Her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of Privy Council do hereby recommend to Major-General Maitland, commander of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom for the time, to order a party of forty-one sentinels, good and sufficient men, duly commanded by an officer, with three sergeants, three corporals and two drums to repair to Leith the                            day of                   ,and there to be shipped aboard her Majesty's ship and man-of-war the Royal William, Captain Thomas Gordon, commander, and the said party to be the same men that were on board the said ship last year as near as possible, and to continue during his cruise.

 

The Same aboard the Royal Mary.

 

Her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of Privy Council do hereby recommend to Major-General Maitland, commander of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom for the time, to order a party of thirty-three sentinels, good and sufficient men, well armed and duly commanded by a lieutenant, with two sergeants, three corporals and two drums to repair to Leith the day of                     , and there to be shipped aboard her Majesty's ship and man-of-war the Royal Mary, Captain James Hamilton, commander, there to continue during his cruise.

 

Recommendation to Major-General Maitland to send a Party of Soldiers aboard The Dumbarton Castle.

 

Her Majesty's High Commissioner and Lords of Privy Council do hereby recommend to Major-General Maitland, commander of her Majesty's forces within this kingdom for the time, to order twenty sentinels, good and sufficient men, duly commanded by an officer, with a sergeant, two corporals and one drum to repair to            upon  the                    day  of                       ,  and there to be shipped aboard her Majesty's ship and man-of-war the Dumbarton Castle, Captain Mathew Campbell, commander, there to con­tinue during his cruise.

 

From the English translation of Colonel Hooke's work as given in the British Museum Add. MSS., 20858.

 

During Hooke's absence[May and June 1707].  in Edinburgh Captain Gordon, commander of the two Scotch frigates on guard upon the coast, the one of 40, the other of 28 cannon had come ashore to the Earl of Erroll, who desired him that, as M. de Ligondez[Captain of a French frigate].  was every day expected, he would avoid him. Therefore the captain gave the earl a signal to be communicated to M. de Ligondez, which when the latter should display, the captain would avoid him. The captain also promised the earl that he would appear no more upon that coast for fifteen days, and begged he would contrive that M. de Ligondez should not remain long in those seas, because, should they frequently meet, the captain who commanded the other frigate under his orders, and whose intentions were dubious, might grow suspicious.

At the same time he desired the earl would inform me that he should soon be obliged to quit the service, because he refuses to take the oath of abjuration, which is going in conse­quence of the Union to be imposed on all the officers, and by which they are to renounce the King of England, and declare that he has no right to the throne. Thus he, the captain, could not be long in a way of rendering any service;   but, if   the King[Louis XIV of France.] will  accept  of his service, he offers to come to France with his 40-gun frigate at the first notice of his Majesty's pleasure.

M. de Ligondez arrived a few days after, before my return to Slains. They gave him just the signal mentioned, and begged him to keep aloof for a fortnight. He returned at the end of three weeks, when he found me at Slains, where he came on shore, and dined with the High Con­stable. [The Earl of Erroll.] But as I had promised to wait for the Duke of Hamilton's answer till the 9th of June, I desire M. de Ligondez to cruise off the coast and return for that day or the day after. On the 8th of June Captain Gordon appeared on the coast, and the day following M. de Ligondez. The two frigates gave him chase and gained round upon him, particularly the 20-gun frigate. Then M. de Ligondez made the signal, upon which Captain Gordon fired a gun to recall his com­panion, which obeyed with reluctance. The two frigates steered off for some time at sea, and Captain de Ligondez, having cruised off for some time at sea, arrived about noon before the High Constable's castle. [ - Slains, Aberdeenshire.] The time appointed for the Duke [of Hamilton's] answer being expired, it was thought proper I should not lose any more time in waiting for it, as it could not be expected to be more favourable than his former answers. I went on board with Mr. Moray about nightfall, and by the vigilance and good conduct of M. de Ligondez we met with no accident in the passage, but arrived safe at Dunkirk the 17th of June after between eight and nine days' sail.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XXV, No. 43.

The States General their letter to the Queen.

 

Madam,—We should willingly dispense our­selves to interrupt your Majesty in the continual care you take (with so much wisdom and affec­tion for the public good and that of your people) in recommending to your care a particular affair, if our duty did not oblige us to speak for our sub­jects, and to protect them in a just cause, as is incontestably this to which we desire your Majesty to give attention. It is three years since that the ship named the Katherine coming from the Canaries loaded with raw wines from those isles was met in full sea upon her voyage towards our port by Captain Gordon a Scotsman com­manding a man-of-war of your Majesty's, who took her and carried her to Edinburgh where she was confiscated and sold very precipitantly in a fort­night, without that those interested had had time to be advertised of it and to give duly the neces­sary orders to reclaim her, and in their own defence also without any just reason or foundation, being 'tis certain that the proprietors James Meyers and others being all citizens in the town of Rotterdam had obtained our passports to have brought this ship and her cargo from the Canaries into our ports : That your Majesty has permitted the trading with Spain and the towns thereunto belonging as also those isles of the Canaries, so that those interested have done nothing contrary to the laws of your Majesty or of ours nor of any treaty or convention : And if that trading had not been permitted in your Majesty's kingdoms, that could in no ways concern our subjects whom that toucheth not, also your Majesty being per­suaded of the wrong done the proprietors above named has had the goodness to order the Treasury of Scotland that the value of the said ship and her cargo should be rendered to them again, but we know not by what misfortune it is that neither the goodness of the cause nor the orders of your Majesty nor the repeated instances of our envoy has been capable to obtain to those interested the. satisfaction that their own good right ought to have procured them. These are the reasons Madam which obligeth us again to take our refuge in the justness and love that your Majesty has always professed in desiring to have the good­ness to order for the future and more at large than before the undamaging of the proprietors of the said ship and cargo, either by those of the treaty of Scotland or any other way which your Majesty shall think more convenient and quick, that the complaints of these our subjects interested which troubles us (because none can but own they have reason) may cease ; the which will no doubt contribute to the conservation of a good intelli­gence betwixt the subjects of either side, the which we know is agreeable to your Majesty', and that we shall try to affirm and augment more and more ; but nothing can be more contrary than not to remedy complaints so well grounded, therefore we hope your Majesty will take it off, and we trust in your love, who cannot suffer in an affair so clear and just our subjects should languish any longer, and that they should be the only people who enjoyeth not the effects of your justice and royal goodness which is the ornament of your glorious reign of which the fame is spread so universally all over the world.    So that in hoping your Majesty will not let our intercession be unfruitful we shall conclude the present in address­ing our prayers to the Almighty.

 

Madam,

To fulfil the reign of your Majesty with glory and felicity and to bless your royal person with perfect health and very long life, from The Hague the 11th of August, 1707, from your Majesty's the very humble servants the States General of the United Provinces of the Low Countries,

By order from them,

FFAGELL.

 

State Papers (Scotland) Warrant Books, Vol. XXV, No. 47.

The  Queen's  Letter to  the  Lords  Commissioners of the Treasury in favour of Captain Gordon.

 

ANNE R.,—Right trusty &c. ... we greet you well. We understanding that Captain Thomas Gordon did in the year 1705 (when commander of our ship the Royal Mary) take near Fraserburgh a small privateer of four guns called the St. Esprit belonging to Ostend, and that when the said privateer was exposed to sale by a public roup, the said captain did buy her and gave bond for the value for our use, which bond lies now in the hands of the Judge Admiral of that part of our kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, and we being resolved to bestow a mark of our royal favour upon the said Captain Gordon, in consideration   of   his  good   services;    therefore of it's our will and pleasure, and we hereby authorise and require you to call for and deliver up to him the foresaid bond, for doing of which this shall be your warrant. And so we bid you heartily farewell. Given at our Court at Windsor Castle the 19th day of August, 1707, and of our reign the 6th year.

By her Majesty's command,

LOUDOUN.


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