Check all the Clans that have DNA Projects. If your Clan is not in the list there's a way for it to be listed.
Glenora Single Malt Whisky

Electric Scotland's Classified Directory An amazing collection of unique holiday cottages, castles and apartments, all over Scotland in truly amazing locations.
Scottish Review

Click here to get a Printer Friendly Page

Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland
VII. The Érainn


The O’Phelans (0 Faolain) are the chiefly family of the Deisis, and were lords of that people and territory prior to the twelfth century Anglo-Norman invasion. They are still a numerous family in this original territory; while a branch also became established (probably as a result of the Anglo-Norman invasion) at Magh Lacha, a plain in the barony of Kells, County Kilkenny, where they also became numerous.

The Partraige
The Partraige were the ancient and remote people who inhabited the wastelands of Iar Connacht (literally, "west of Connacht," i.e., beyond Connacht proper) between Loch Corrib and Loch Mask. Little is heard of them besides their existence until the emergence in historical times of the O’Malleys, who later disguised their origin by the assertion of kinship with the Ui Briuin Gaels (which was probably founded on intermarriage).

The O’Malleys (0 Maille) were a great sea-power around Clew Bay in County Mayo. Their territory was coextensive with the baronies of Burrishoole and Murresk on the west coast of County Mayo. Their leading men were often famous as naval commanders, and the clan always had a considerable fleet under their power, an unusual occurrence in Ireland, even among coastal families. The O’Malleys were known to literature as the Manannans, or "sea-gods" of the Western Ocean, and many tales tell of their prowess. There appears to have been a branch of the family settled before the sixteenth century in the Limerick area, as lords of Tuath Luimnigh.

The Uaithni
The Uaithni were located in County Galway in prehistoric times, but later came to inhabit the northeast of County Limerick and the adjoining part of County Tipperary. In historical times the tribe is represented by the O’Heffernans.

The O’I-Ieffernans (0 hlfearna in) were anciently the chiefs of UaithneCliach, now the barony of Owneybeg, in the east of County Limerick. They were dispossessed by the O’Mulryans in the fourteenth century, but families of the name are still very numerous in Limerick and Tipperary.

The Ui Bairrche
The Ui Bairrche were originally from South Wexford, in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, but they were driven from this territory by the Laigin of Ui Ceinnsealaigh, and the main body settled among their allies among the northern Laigin, mainly in the area of the barony of Slievemargy in the southeastern corner of Leix and the adjoining portions of Carlow and Kilkenhy. Their chief representatives in historical times are the OTracys and MacGormans.

The MacGormans (Mac Gormain) were, prior to the Anglo-Norman invasion, lords of Ui Bairrche. Soon afterwards, however, they were driven from


Page 69

Index

Page 71

[Page 70]

 

 


This comment system requires you to be logged in through either a Disqus account or an account you already have with Google, Twitter, Facebook or Yahoo. In the event you don't have an account with any of these companies then you can create an account with Disqus. All comments are moderated so they won't display until the moderator has approved your comment.

comments powered by Disqus

Quantcast