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A collection of Monroe descendants


Our thanks to George A Monroe, M. D. for sending in this huge list of Monroe's.
George William Monroe
b. april 14, 1782
d. Oct 14, 1869
 
First definite location of the ancestors in the MONROE-PETERS line is in McMinn County, TN which was created November 5, 1819 from a part of the Indian lands, ceded by the Cherokee Indians to the US in that year.  Further tracing will determine whether the families were inhabitants at the time the county was organized, or arrived soon afterward.  The town of Athens was laid off 1821-22 and in 1823 the courts of the County were moved there.
 
In 1826, the George Monroe, Sr. family home was approximately nine miles from Athens on the Mount Verd-Pond Hill Road and Athens was their post office.  They were farmers and through the years they acquired land and slaves and became quite prosperous.
 
Early on, George W. Monroe, Sr. gave land on his farm for a community cemetery.  It may have been started as a family cemetery.  In it are about 125 umarked graves.  Most of those marked are of Monroe family members, but Eliza and her son Horace must lie among those unmarked.  In 1879, which was ten years after the death of George W. and six years after that of his wife, Elizabeth, the Baptist denomination established a church by the cemetery and named it Pond Hill.  They were also given charge of the cemetery.  This is surprising, since George was a Methodist minister.  His gravestone reads, "Grandfather" and Elizabeth's reads, "Grandmother".
 
The Monroe clan were in McMinn County, TN when the Civil War began in 1861.  The Monroes were farmers and slave owners like their neighbors, but their sympathies were with the Union cause.  On November 1, 1862, In Pulaski, TN two of George, Sr.'s sons and two of his grandsons enlisted and were enrolled in Company "C", 3rd Regiment, East TN Calvary Volunteers.  They included:  Joseph, then 44; George Jr, then 48; Jesse Lafayette, 21 and Sherwood, 19.  (Or Sheridan  -  Census people and the Army couldn't decide which.)  They were mustered-in at Huntsville.
 
At the time of his families enlistment, George Sr., was too old to fight (being almost 80) but not too old for the indignities of war.  Confederate sympathizers went to his home, hung him to the limb of a tree until he told where his money was, stole the money, took anything else they wanted, then left the place practically wrecked.  No doubt this happened after the enlistment of the younger Monroes in the Federal ranks and probably incited because of those enlistments.  Had they been there, there would have been blood shed over the incident. 
 
The war was very real to the Tennesseeans at this time as many battles were being fought on their soil, and very soon it was to be tragic for the Monroe family.  On December 31, 1862, and January 2, 1863, just two months after their enlistments, the Battle of Stones River (Called by the Confederates the Battle of Murfreesboro) was fought.  Murfreesboro is the county seat of Rutherford County on the West fork of Stones River just 33 miles southeast of Nashville.  The Union Army occupied Murfreesboro when the Confederates withdrew, but the losses on both sides were very heavy.  Of 37, 712 Confederates present for duty, 1,294 were killed; 7,945 wounded and about 2500 missing.  On the Union side, of 44, 800 present  for duty, 1677 were killed; 7,543 wounded and 3,686 missing.  (Encyclopedia Britannica) 
 
Joseph and George Monroe, Jr. were among the casualties on the Union side.  George was wounded and died Feb 6, 1863 in the Field hospital near Murfreesboro.  Jessee Lafayette saw both his father and his uncle buried in trenches with others.  The Uncle Joseph wrapped in his blanket; George Jr, in a pine box.  Perhaps the difference was because the stress of battle and the burial aftermath were over before George died.  It was not because of difference in rank because according to Army records, they were all privates.  These were the "remarks" on George, Jr.'s Muster card:  "Last paid to:  Never Paid."  "Clothing Account - last paid:  Never"  "Bounty paid - None"  "Due - $100".
 
**This information was compiled by Cecil Grace Hollis Puryear, paternal grandmother of Jerry Cecil Puryear, a direct descendant of Robert Monroe.
 
Taken from Chancery Court Records of McMinn County, TN (Boyer, 1980):
 
#293  Joseph WILSON & wife, & others v. Harriet MONROE & others.  Filed 26 June 1871.  George MONROE died in McMinn Cou. 13 Oct. 1868, age about eighty-six, leaving widow Elizabeth and heirs as follows, with information given in depositions in parentheses.  Complaintants, children or grandchildren of George MONROE dec'd:  1.  Nancy, wife of Joseph WILSON of MO; 2.  Chatharine DOBBS of MO, 3.  Jesse MONROE of AL, 4.  daughter Margaret HARDIN of McMinn Co., (age fifty-four in 1872, has three grown children and lived on farm of George MONROE dec'd); 5.  son Robert of KY (gone many years but had grown children when he left and he lived on farm of George dec'd for twenty years; 6. Martha, widow of son William MONROE dec'd and two children names unknown of AL and one child name and residence not known;  7.  Margaret, widow of son George Jr. dec'd (George lived on farm about fifteen years);  8.  Jesse L. MONROE; 9. grandson Sherwood M. MONROE (son of George Jr. and age twenty-six in 1872); 10.  granddaughter Samintha P. wife of William M. STANTON;  11.  Eliza B. wife of James McKEEHAN;  12.  grandson Millard F. born Sept. 1852;  13.  Joseph McCOLLUM (grandson);  14.  Alice PEARCE of IL;  Defendants, all of McMinn Co., are the widow Elizabeth, and Harriet MONROE, widow of Joseph, dec'd, and children of Harriet and Joseph to wit Mary E.J.B., wife of Wiley N. WALLACE(signed Wallis); Margaret E., wife of John L. McCHRISTIAN (signed McCuistion); William M.; Louis F.; Horace L.; Charles B.; Joseph M.; Sarah A.; Elizabeth P.; and George N. MONROE, the last four minors.  Joseph, the youngest son of George and Elizabeth, was taken off a prisoner about 1863 and has not been seen any more, and he lived with his father.  Complaintants charge that George Sr. was under the influence of Harriet who with her children had lived in part of same house with George Sr. for about twenty years and that Harriet procurred him to make fraudulent deeds (copies are in file) of his most valuable land, leaving only a small tract to be divided among the widow and the other heirs.  They ask that deeds be declared null and void.  Case is compromised 1874 by defendants paying complaintants but in 1875 fund is not paid, land is levied upon and is sold to Chapman Wallace.  Depositions to be taken 1872 of Margaret HARDIN, Martha A. Utley, and Thomas C. Odom at the counting room of Morgan M. Bryan at Ten Mile Stand, Meigs Co.  Widow Elizabeth answers that George Sr. was a Minister of the Gospel, that she has a comfortable home with Harriet and is treated well.  Witness A.G. Small, age forty-five, 1873, deposes that he went to George MONROE's house to preach the funeral of his son Joseph.
Sanders Alexander Monroe fought in the Civil war and was captured in Tupelo, Mississippi, in April, 1865.  He was paroled a month later, and married Sarah A. (Parker) Beard in September, 1865.  In 1869, Sanders Monroe was in a wagon train which left Oktibbeha Countr, Mississippi, and ended up in Lexington, Lee County, Texas.
 
Present in the 1870 Census.  Lived in Lexington or got mail there.  At that time, Lexington was in Burleson County.  Burleson County was split, and Lexington is now part of Lee county.
 
Robert W. G. Monroe also shows up in the same Census listing for Lexington P.O. precinct.
 
Samuel Monroe is listed on the same Census Page, but was listed for the Caldwell P.O., just a few miles to the east, but still in Burleson County.Confederate Veteran: CSA.  His wife, Sarah A. Monroe: "My husband volunteered at the out-break of the war and served four years.  I think he served in the Cavalry, first, and was transferred to the Infantry....My name is Sarah A. Monroe and I am the widow of Sanders Monroe--I know of my own personal knowledge that the said Sanders Monroe performed the duties of a Confederate soldier in the war between the States, and that he did not desert the Confederacy, but served until the close of the War.
     I have made diligent inquiry, but have not been able to find any one with whom my husband served, or who knows the name of the organization in which he served, or the letter of his company.  I know that he served in the Cavalry and think he was transferred to the Infantry--He served in Lorings division--I have heard him speak of the organization of which he was a member many times, but I have forgotten and cannot now recall any of the details of his record as a soldier."  S.A. Monroe   8/2/1920
     W.A. Sikes testifies that Sanders A. Monroe was a Confederate Soldier- and entered in the service in the State of Mississippi..that he was paroled in Jackson Miss...and returned to his home on Octibbeha County, Miss.- and shortly after his arrival home, the said Sanders Monroe came into his community and stated that he was a discharged Confederate Soldier, and that he enlisted in the service in Kentucky, and that he had been paroled in Mississippi.
     John H. Tate, county Judge, Lee County: "you will recall that Mrs Monroe states in her affidavit that her husband served under Loring.  I have undertaken to look up Loring's Record, and find that he first saw service in West Virginia.  Late in the war he commanded a division and surrendered his command either in Miss. or Tennessee.  I doubt if he organized a Kentucky Company, but doubtless Monroe saw service in some command in Loring's Division.  I feel sure that this woman is entitled to a Pension..."
     John H. Tate, County Judge, Lee County: "Mrs. Monroe is quite old and does not remember things well, but she tells me, now, that she believes her husband enlisted in Paducah, Kentucky, McCracken County."
     Comptroller's Dept:  Request the military record of Sanders Monroe who is reported to have enlisted in Loring's Division (or Regt), Kentucky Infantry, 3rd Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and 7th Kentucky Cavalry.
     WAR DEPARTMENT:Sanders Monroe: first Capt. T.T.Barnett's Co K. 3 Mtd Ky. Inf CSA was enrolled July 19, 1861 ???? ???? on Co. Muster Roll, May & June 1864 Present
     Prisoner of war records show Sanders Monroe Priv Co A. 7 Kn. Cavy. CSA. Captured May 18, 1865 at Tuscaloosa and Paroled in May, 1865, exact date not known.  Name not found on rolls of Co. A.7 Ky Cav CSA

Andrew Monroe was the 3rd son of David Munro.  Andrew, under his distinguished relative, General Sir George Munro I, of Newcome, fought with the rank of Major at the Battle of Preston, 17 August, 1648.  Andrew was taken prisoner and banished to Virginia, America.  Andrew managed to escape (or worked off his indentureship) and settled in Northumberland Co., Virginia, where he had several grants of land made to him, the first extending to 200 acres, designated as one of the "Head Rights", being dated 8 Jan. 1650.  Andrew died, leaving issue (according to Westmoreland Deed Book) as listed on the Family Page.  (??"Moved from Scotland to Maryland c.1641, to Virginia, c.1648, and settled on Monroe Bay, Westmoreland County, Virginia)...(Major Monroe was born in Scotland, & came to Maryland before 1642 when he represented St. Mary's Co. in the Assembly.  In 1648, due to religious troubles, he crossed the Potomac & seated himself in Westmoreland, and there received large patents on that creek now called Monroe Bay).
 
Andrew began to write the name Munroe and it finally attained its present form, Monroe
 
One source states: " Andrew (Munro) Monroe was a vicar/preacher who came to America in 1642.
Andrew Munro was married to Elizabeth Alexander.  They had six children. Andrew's brother William was the great grandfather of James Monroe, the fifth President of the USA."
.......
This same??? "Andrew Monroe emigrated from Scotland to America in 1650; he belonged to an ancient highland clan and was Captain in the service of Charles I.  He received a grant of land on the borders of Monroe's Creek (so-called after the family) about one mile below Bluff Point and about four miles from Pope's Creek (where Washington was born) on the Potomac in Northumbefrland County.  In the time of Charles II he retgurned to Scotland and induced others of his family to emigrate and another extensive grant of land in the same quarter was made to him by the Crown."
.......
On page 480 of MacKenzie's History is stated "Andrew, 3rd son of David Monro, fought with rank of Major at battle of Preston (Lancashire) 17th Aug. 1648.  Was taken prisoner there and banished to Virginia, America. He escaped and settled in Northumberland County, Virginia, where he had a grant of 200 acres land dated 8th June 1650.  He married and had issue, from whom President James Monroe was probably descended."
 
...................
 
QUOTE: from Mr. James D. Evans, a descendant of the Monroe family, and an ardent student of genealogy:--"The identity & derivation of the immigrant, the 1st Andrew Monroe, has not, I think, been settled by the assumption that he was indubitably the Major Andrew Monroe, 3rd son of David Munro of Scotland who participated in the Battle of Preston and being taken prisoner by the English (1648) was banished to Virginia.  The article which appears in the William and Mary quarterly, written by Mr. Edward S. lewis of St. Louis, which attempts to substantiate that identity is by no means conclusive.  It presents nothing more than an interesting conjecture but no evidence except indentity of name.  There is very positive proof that Andrew Monroe who appeared in Virginia and westmoreland county in 1650 and patented lands on what later became known as Monroe's Creek, and who can be none other than the first of the Monroes who for generations remained in unbroken line in that vicinity, came there from St. Mary's County, Maryland, and was the same as is traceable in the Maryland Archives back to 1642 in the same place.  He appears there to have been assessed 50 lbs. of tobacco in July 1642, to support the war against the susquehanna Indians (Md. Assy. Proceedings V. 2-30/2 Entry Book #53) and again as a freeholder represented in the Assembly by Capt. Thos. Cornwallis on 22 august 1642 (Md. Arch. Acts of Assy. V. I-165).  On 24 February 1647 he was defendant in a suit of Mrs Mary Brent in which he was decreed to pay her 400 lbs. of Tobacco (Md. Arch. IV-330).  On the 6 April 1648 Andrew Monroe signed with his mark as witness a deed of gift from Burgess Thomas Sutrman to his son John Sturman to all his cattle and his shallop 'now in Maryland.' (Ib. 362). On 6 April 1648 Andrew Munrowe of Appomattox in Virginia (a point on the Potomac across the river from St. Mary's, Md.) made a bill of sale for a feifer 2 years old to Thos. Sturman which was witnessed by John sturman (Ib-383).  It is likely, if not certain, that Andrew Monroe went to Virginia from Maryland in 1647, with Thomas Youell and Thomas Sturman. These two men originally steeled in Kent isle in the Chesapeake--1st claimed by Col. Wm. Clayburn of the Virginia Council who settled it in 1634 or earlier but was in 1638 dispossessed by Lord Calvery.  In 1647/8 Thomas Sturman and Andrew Monroe left St. Mary's and settled near Youell in Westmoreland. county.  John Sturman later also crossed into Virginia where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Patrick & Dorcas Spence, the sister of Elanor Spence, who married Andrew the 2nd, son of Andrew the 1st, the Immigrant.
 
........
 
The following is taken for the History & Register of the Colonial Dames of Virginia, page 497, and is basis for Colonial Dame Claim:--"andrew Monroe of Md. born in Scotland in___and died in Virginia 1668.  Resided in Va. & Md. 1642-1668.  Member of the Maryland Association, 1642. Captain of a ship under Cuthbert Fenwick."
 
..........
 
In the preceding paragraphs we have tried to give as much evidence as possible in regard to the identity & derivation of the immigrant Monroe. In brief, it will be noted that there are two schools of thought among most Monroe genealogists--(1) those that think him to be the son of David & Agnes (Munro) Munro of scotland, fought in the Battle of Preston with rank of Majoy, 1648, was banished & came to Virginia where he settled; (2) those that think him to be of undetermined derivation, first appearing in St. Mary's county, Md., in 1642, & later, about 1647/8, moving across the Potomac River to Westmoreland Co., Va., where he settled & died.
 
However, it is the opinion of the writers that these two Andrew Monroes are identical; that is that Andrew Monroe, the 3rd son of David Munro of Ktgewell & Anges Munro, his wife, came first ot America about 1642 & settled in St. Mary's Co., Md., where he lived & we find record of him, moving about 2647 to Virginia & living at Appomattox, Westmoreland Co., until about April, 1648, when (as intimated in the quotation from Lund Washington) he returned to Scotland, fought in the Battle of Preston with the rank of Major on 17th Aug. 1648, where he was taken prisoner & banished to Virginia--again settling in Westmoreland Co., where he died in 1668.
Fast Fact: James Monroe declared the Americas no longer subject to European colonization.
 
Biography:On New Year's day, 1825, at the last of his annual white House receptions, President James Monroe made a pleasing impression upon a Virginia lady who shook his hand:  "He is tall and well formed.  His dress plain, and in the old style...His manner was quiet and dignified. From the frank, honest expression of his eye...I think he well deserves the encomium passed upon him by the great (Thomas) Jefferson, who said, "Monroe was so honest that if you turned his soul inside out there would not be a spot on it.";"
 
     Born in Westmoreland county, Virginia, in 1758, Monroe attended the College of William and Mary, fought with distinction in the Continental army, and practiced law in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
 
     As a youthful politician, he joined the anti-Federalists in the Virginia Convention which ratified the Constitution, and in 1790, an advocate of Jeffersonian policies, was elected United States Senator.  as Minister to France in 1794-1796, he displayed strong sympathies for the french cause;  later, with Robert R Livingston, he helped negotiate the Louisiana Purchase.
 
     His ambition and energy, together with the backing of President Madison, made him the Republican choice for the Presidency in 1816.  With little Federalist opposition, he easily won re-election in 1820.
 
     Monroe made unusually strong Cabined choices, naming a Southerner, John C. Calhoun, as Secretary of War, and a Northerner, John Quincy Adams, as Secretary of State.  Only Henry Clay's refusal kept Monroe from adding an outstanding Westerner.
 
     Early in his administration, Monroe undertook a goodwill tour.  At Boston, his visit was hailed as the beginning of an "Era of Good Feelings."  Unfortunately these "good feelings" did not endure, although Monroe, his popularity undiminished, followed nationalist policies. cont.
 
 
     James Monroe attended William and Mary College and studied law (1780-83) under Thomas Jefferson, whose life long friend and political supporter he became.  In 1786 he married Elizabeth Kortright; they had three children.
     Monroe was wounded in the American Revolution, during which he achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He served in Congress under the Articles of Confederation and  opposed the adoption of the US Constitution.
 
     James Monroe first practiced law (1786-1789) in the historic district of Fredericksburg, Virginia.  From here Monroe went on to hold a remarkable number of high public offices, including that of U.S. Senator, American minister to France, England and Spain, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, Secretary of War, and 5th President of the United States.
 
     In 1823 President Monroe signed his annual message to Congress, a section of which became known as the Monroe Doctrine.  "But, with the governments (in this hemisphere) who have declared their independence, and maintained it, and whose independence we have...acknowledged, we could not view any interposition for the purpose of oppressing them...by any European power, in any other light than as the manifestation of an unfriendly disposition toward the United States."  It is partly through this doctrine that Latin American countries have been protected against foreign aggression, and the security of the United States has been safeguarded.
 
     Monroe's administration is remembered as the "era of good feelings".  Relations improved with Britain, France, Spain, and Canada. His most impressive achievement was the Monroe Doctrine.  The Missouri Compromise (1820) settled the slavery issue for three decades.  Monroe encouraged the settling of Liberia, whose capital, Monrovia, was named after him.
 
           A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY OF JAMES MONROE 1758-1831
 
1758 April 28, born in Westmoreland County, Va.
1774-1776 Attended College of William & Mary
1776-1780 Joined the Continental Army as a Lieutenant, wounded at Battle of Trenton & promoted to Captain for "Conspicuous Gallantry", wintered at
Valley Forge, received appointment to Lieutenant Colonel by Virginia Legislature
1780 Studied law under Governor Thomas Jefferson, in Williamsburg.
1783-83 Member of Virginia House of Delegates
1783-86 Delegate to the Confederation Congress
1786 February 16, married Elizabeth Kortright
1786 Practiced law in Fredericksburg
1786 December 5, birth of Eliza
1787-89 Member of Virginia House of Delegates
1788 Member of Virginia Convention to Ratify Constitution
1789 Moved to Charlottesville, Virginia
1790-94 United States Senator from Virginia
1793 Purchased "HIGHLAND" plantation adjacent to Monticello
1794-96 Minister to France under President Washington
1799 May, birth of James Spence, November 23, family moved to HIGHLAND
1800 September 23, death of James Spence
1799-1802 Governor of Virginia
1803 Birth of Maria Hester
1803 Envoy to France to negotiate purchase of Louisiana Territory
1803-07 Minister to England & Spain under President Jefferson
1804 Negotiator for purchase of Florida
1808 October 17, marriage of Eliza at HIGHLAND
1810 Member of Virginia Assembly
1811 Governor of Virginia
1811-17 Secretary of State under Madison
1814-15 Secretary of War under Madison
1817 October 5, laid cornerstone of University of Virginia, Charlottesville.
1817-20 President of the United States: "The Era of Good Feelings".
1820 March 9, marriage of Maria Hester in the White House.
1823 December 2, MONROE DOCTRINE; address to Congress declared
"1ST U.S. FOREIGN POLICY".
1826 HIGHLAND sold.
1827 Member of Board of Visitors, University of Virginia.
1829 Chairman of Virginia Constitutional Convention.
1830 September 23, death of Elizabeth; moved to daughter's home in New York
1831 July 4, died in the home of his daughter at 63 Prince Street, New York City.
1858 Although President Monroe was initially interred in New York, his remains were moved from to New York to Richmond, in 1858, and he was interred in a
new tomb in Hollywood Cemetery.
 
Fast Fact: James Monroe declared the Americas no longer subject to European colonization.
 
First Inaugural Address
Second Inaugural Address
 
Biography: On New Year's Day, 1825, at the last of his annual White House receptions, President James Monroe made a pleasing impression upon a Virginia lady who shook his hand:
 
"He is tall and well formed. His dress plain and in the old style.... His manner was quiet and dignified. From the frank, honest expression of his eye ... I think he well deserves the encomium passed upon him by the great Jefferson, who said, 'Monroe was so honest that if you turned his soul inside out there would not be a spot on it.' "
 
Born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1758, Monroe attended the College of William and Mary, fought with distinction in the Continental Army, and practiced law in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
 
As a youthful politician, he joined the anti-Federalists in the Virginia Convention which ratified the Constitution, and in 1790, an advocate of Jeffersonian policies, was elected United States Senator. As Minister to France in 1794-1796, he displayed strong sympathies for the French cause; later, with Robert R. Livingston, he helped negotiate the Louisiana Purchase.
 
His ambition and energy, together with the backing of President Madison, made him the Republican choice for the Presidency in 1816. With little Federalist opposition, he easily won re-election in 1820.
 
Monroe made unusually strong Cabinet choices, naming a Southerner, John C. Calhoun, as Secretary of War, and a northerner, John Quincy Adams, as Secretary of State. Only Henry Clay's refusal kept Monroe from adding an outstanding Westerner.
 
Early in his administration, Monroe undertook a goodwill tour. At Boston, his visit was hailed as the beginning of an "Era of Good Feelings." Unfortunately these "good feelings" did not endure, although Monroe, his popularity undiminished, followed nationalist policies.
 
Across the facade of nationalism, ugly sectional cracks appeared. A painful economic depression undoubtedly increased the dismay of the people of the Missouri Territory in 1819 when their application for admission to the Union as a slave state failed. An amended bill for gradually eliminating slavery in Missouri precipitated two years of bitter debate in Congress.
 
The Missouri Compromise bill resolved the struggle, pairing Missouri as a slave state with Maine, a free state, and barring slavery north and west of Missouri forever.
 
In foreign affairs Monroe proclaimed the fundamental policy that bears his name, responding to the threat that the more conservative governments in Europe might try to aid Spain in winning back her former Latin American colonies. Monroe did not begin formally to recognize the young sister republics until 1822, after ascertaining that Congress would vote appropriations for diplomatic missions. He and Secretary of State John Quincy Adams wished to avoid trouble with Spain until it had ceded the Floridas, as was done in 1821.
 
Great Britain, with its powerful navy, also opposed reconquest of Latin America and suggested that the United States join in proclaiming "hands off." Ex-Presidents Jefferson and Madison counseled Monroe to accept the offer, but Secretary Adams advised, "It would be more candid ... to avow our principles explicitly to Russia and France, than to come in as a cock-boat in the wake of the British man-of-war."
 
Monroe accepted Adams's advice. Not only must Latin America be left alone, he warned, but also Russia must not encroach southward on the Pacific coast. ". . . the American continents," he stated, "by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European Power." Some 20 years after Monroe died in 1831, this became known as the Monroe Doctrine.
 
President James Monroe, oldest of five children, was born in Westmoreland County on April 28, 1758. His mother's brother was Judge Joseph Jones who was a friend to Washington, Jefferson and Madison. In 1774, when he was 16, Monroe was sent to Williamsburg where he attended William and Mary College. Before the year was over, his father died, but Judge Jones paid the bills to keep Monroe in school. He joined a student-formed military company and in 1775 received a lieutenant's commission in the Third Virginia Regiment. By the time Monroe was 21 he was promoted to major.
Later, Monroe studied under Thomas Jefferson who was at that time governor. He spent three years with Jefferson and they remained friends. It was easy to be friends with James Monroe. "He is a man," said Jefferson," whose soul might be turned wrong side outwards without discovering a blemish to the world." Monroe was trustworthy and trusting. He even kept his friends through heated political disagreements.
 
James Monroe's political career flourished at home. Two reasons for his success were his extraordinary administrative skills and his fortunate friendships. During the Presidency of Washington (under whom he had served during the Revolution,) Monroe was recalled from France for not following the policies of the administration he represented. But, Jefferson, Monroe's mentor, and Madison, his friend, had organized the Democratic-Republican party. Monroe's return to a well-established opposition party helped lessen the blow of being recalled in disgrace. It made the recall seem like a political matter.
 
In 1799 Monroe was elected governor of Virginia, but in 1803 he failed again on a diplomatic mission abroad. Re-elected governor in 1811, he was called to Washington by Madison, whose Department of State was in chaos. Monroe straightened out the State Department and brought order to the War Department during the hostilities with England. His reward was the Presidency in 1817.
 
James Monroe was the fifth President of the United States and held office from 1817 - 1825. He died in New York in 1831, the third of the nation's Presidents to die on the Fourth of July.
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
In the following letter, a twenty-year-old James Monroe writes to Mrs. Prevost regarding a young woman and a possible visit to France.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------
November 8, 1778, Philadelphia
 
Mrs. Prevost,
But why should I desire you to do what I know your own heart will dictate? for a heart so capable of friendship feels its own pain alleviated by alleviating that of others.
 
A young lady who either is, or pretends to be, in love, is, you know, my dear Mrs. Prevost, the most unreasonable creature in existence. If she looks a smile, or a frown, which does not immediately give or deprive you of happiness (at least to appearance), your company soon becomes very insipid. Each feature has its beauty, and each attitude the graces, or you have no judgment. But if you are so stupidly insensible of her charms as to deprive your tongue and eyes of every-expression of admiration, and not only to be silent respecting her, but devote them to an absent object, she cannot receive a higher insult; nor would she, if not restrained by politeness, refrain from open resentment.
 
Upon this principle I think I stand excused for not writing [to you] from B. Ridge [Baskenridge, Lord Stirling's estate]. I proposed it, however; and, after meeting with opposition in--, to obtain her point, she promised to visit the little 'Hermitage' [Mrs. Prevost's home at Paramus], and make my excuses herself. I took occasion to turn the conversation to a different object, and plead for permission to go to France. I gave up in one instance, and she certainly ought to in, the other. But writing a letter and going to France are very different, you will perhaps say. She objected to it, and all the arguments which a fond, delicate, unmarried lady could use, she did not fail to produce against it. I plead the advantage I should derive from it. The personal improvement, the connexions I should make. I told her she was not the only one on whom fortune did not smile in every instance. I produced examples from her own acquaintance, and represented their situation in terms which sensibly affected both herself and Lady C. [probably Catharine, Lord Stirling's daughter]. I painted a lady [Mrs. Prevost] full of affection, of tenderness, and sensibility, separated from her husband, for a series of time, by the cruelty of war--her uncertainty respecting his health; the pain and anxiety which must naturally arise from it. I represented, in the most pathetic terms, the disquietude which, from the nature of her connexion, might possibly intrude on her domestic retreat. I then raised to her view fortitude under distress, cheerfulness, life, and gayety, in the midst of affliction.
 
I hope you will forgive me, my dear little friend, if I produced you to give life to the image. The instance, she owned, was applicable. She felt for you from her heart, and she has a heart capable of feeling. She wished not a misfortune similar to yours; but, if I was resolved to make it so, she would strive to imitate your example. I have now permission to go where I please, but you must not forget her. She and Lady C-- promise to come to the Hermitage to spend a week or two. Encourage her, and represent the advantage I shall gain from travel. But why should I desire you to do what I know your own heart will dictate? for a heart so capable of friendship feels its own pain alleviated by alleviating that of others.
 
But do not suppose that my attention is only taken up with my own affairs. I am too much attached ever to forget the Hermitage. Mrs. Duvall, I hope, is recovering; and Kitty's indisposition is that of my nearest relation. Mrs. de Visme [Mrs. Prevost's sister-in-law] has delicate nerves. Tell me her children are well, and I know she has a flow of spirits, for her health depends entirely on theirs.
 
I was unfortunate in not being able to meet with the governor [Governor Livingston]. He was neither at Elizabethtown, B. Ridge, Princeton, nor Trenton. I have consulted with several members of Congress on the occasion. They own the injustice, but cannot interfere. The laws of each state must govern itself. They cannot conceive the possibility of its taking place. General Lee [probably General Charles Lee, then in Philadelphia] says it must not take place; and if he was an absolute monarch, he would issue an order to prevent it.
 
I am introduced to the gentleman I wished by General Lee in a very particular manner. I cannot determine with certainty what I shall do till my arrival in Virginia.
 
Make my compliments to Mrs. and Miss De Visme, and believe me, with the sincerest friendship,
 

Yours,
 
 James Monroe
 
[The above letter is reproduced exactly as written and was obtained through the archives at the Library of Congress]
 
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Doctor Zebra > Presidential health > List of Presidents > James Monroe [Text Version] 
  
    The Medical History of President
  James Monroe
   
   
 President #5.   Lived: 17581831.     Served: 18171825.   
 
 
 
 Timeline:  <== 2002
|<== 1776
 
Maladies = tall and broad gunshot wound recurrent malaria unknown fever seizure general decline wrist injury ?tuberculosis Resources
 
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      Maladies and Conditions [Top]
 
 
 

tall and broad 
At age 18 he was "a little over 6 feet tall, with broad shoulders and a massive, raw-boned frame." [1a]
 
 
 
 

gunshot wound 
At the Battle of Trenton in 1776, a bullet grazed the left side of Monroe's chest, then hit his shoulder and injured the axillary artery (the major artery bringing blood to the arm). The artery bled profusely. Monroe's life was probably saved by the doctor who stopped the bleeding by sticking his index finger into the wound and applying pressure to the artery. Surgeons later attempted to remove the bullet, but could not find it. Monroe recovered from the wound in 11 weeks, but carried the bullet in his shoulder the rest of his life. [1b]
 
 
 
 

recurrent malaria 
Contracted malaria while visiting a swampy are of the Mississippi River in 1785, and became very ill. He had several episodes of fever later in life, which were probably flare-ups of malaria. [1c]
 
 
 
 

unknown 
In March 1815, Monroe developed a prolonged illness of unknown type. It was apparently due to the strain of his duties, which included both Secretary of State and Secretary of War during the War of 1812 (which lasted until early 1815). His health began improving in the summer of 1815, after he relinquished his responsibilities in the War Department. His appearance improved more slowly. [1c]
 
 
 
 

fever 
President Monroe was bedridden with a fever, probably malaria, in early 1818. About this time, a letter from General Andrew Jackson arrived at the White House, asked for permission to capture Florida for the United States. Jackson ultimately did so, but Monroe later claimed no such permission had ever been given. Jackson disagreed. A "massive misunderstanding" had somehow occurred. In fact, Monroe may never have been aware of the letter or its contents. [1d]
 
 
 
 

seizure 
Monroe had a seizure in August 1825. It was so severe that he was thought to be near death. He recovered, but the cause was never discovered. Possible causes include mushroom poisoning, a stroke, or cerebral malaria. [1e]
 
 
 
 

general decline 
When Monroe left the Presidency, he was exhausted and looked much older than his 67 years. [1e]
 
 
 
 

wrist injury 
He fell off his horse in 1829 and injured his right wrist. He was unable to keep up with his correspondence for several weeks. [1e]
 
 
 
 

?tuberculosis 
Monroe developed a chronic lung illness in late 1830. In April 1831 he wrote: "My state of health continues, consisting of a cough which annoys me night and day accompanied by considerable expectoration." No specific diagnosis was made, although his doctor recommended a rest at a tuberculosis hospital. Baumgarner writes [1f]:
It is known that the illness lasted for several months and involved his lungs progressively. He had a harassing, exhausting cough, and suffered from fever and severe night sweats. His cough was productive of much mucous and at times gushes of blood. As the disease [progressed], his breathing became more difficult. The clinical picture is highly suggestive but is not diagnostic of pulmonary tuberculosis.
 
 
 
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      Resources [Top]
 
   
 
Bumgarner, John R. The Health of the Presidents: The 41 United States Presidents Through 1993 from a Physician's Point of View. Jefferson, NC: MacFarland & Company, 1994. ISBN 0-89950-956-8   [a] p. 32 [b] pp. 32-33 [c] p. 33 [d] pp. 33-34 [e] p. 34 [f] p. 35
 
The James Monroe web page at the White House.
Andrew Monroe was the 3rd son of David Munro.  Andrew, under his distinguished relative, General Sir George Munro I, of Newcome, fought with the rank of Major at the Battle of Preston, 17 August, 1648.  Andrew was taken prisoner and banished to Virginia, America.  Andrew managed to escape (or worked off his indentureship) and settled in Northumberland Co., Virginia, where he had several grants of land made to him, the first extending to 200 acres, designated as one of the "Head Rights", being dated 8 Jan. 1650.  Andrew died, leaving issue (according to Westmoreland Deed Book) as listed on the Family Page.  (??"Moved from Scotland to Maryland c.1641, to Virginia, c.1648, and settled on Monroe Bay, Westmoreland County, Virginia)...(Major Monroe was born in Scotland, & came to Maryland before 1642 when he represented St. Mary's Co. in the Assembly.  In 1648, due to religious troubles, he crossed the Potomac & seated himself in Westmoreland, and there received large patents on that creek now called Monroe Bay).
 
Andrew began to write the name Munroe and it finally attained its present form, Monroe
 
One source states: " Andrew (Munro) Monroe was a vicar/preacher who came to America in 1642.
Andrew Munro was married to Elizabeth Alexander.  They had six children. Andrew's brother William was the great grandfather of James Monroe, the fifth President of the USA."
.......
This same??? "Andrew Monroe emigrated from Scotland to America in 1650; he belonged to an ancient highland clan and was Captain in the service of Charles I.  He received a grant of land on the borders of Monroe's Creek (so-called after the family) about one mile below Bluff Point and about four miles from Pope's Creek (where Washington was born) on the Potomac in Northumbefrland County.  In the time of Charles II he retgurned to Scotland and induced others of his family to emigrate and another extensive grant of land in the same quarter was made to him by the Crown."
.......
On page 480 of MacKenzie's History is stated "Andrew, 3rd son of David Monro, fought with rank of Major at battle of Preston (Lancashire) 17th Aug. 1648.  Was taken prisoner there and banished to Virginia, America. He escaped and settled in Northumberland County, Virginia, where he had a grant of 200 acres land dated 8th June 1650.  He married and had issue, from whom President James Monroe was probably descended."
 
...................
 
QUOTE: from Mr. James D. Evans, a descendant of the Monroe family, and an ardent student of genealogy:--"The identity & derivation of the immigrant, the 1st Andrew Monroe, has not, I think, been settled by the assumption that he was indubitably the Major Andrew Monroe, 3rd son of David Munro of Scotland who participated in the Battle of Preston and being taken prisoner by the English (1648) was banished to Virginia.  The article which appears in the William and Mary quarterly, written by Mr. Edward S. lewis of St. Louis, which attempts to substantiate that identity is by no means conclusive.  It presents nothing more than an interesting conjecture but no evidence except indentity of name.  There is very positive proof that Andrew Monroe who appeared in Virginia and westmoreland county in 1650 and patented lands on what later became known as Monroe's Creek, and who can be none other than the first of the Monroes who for generations remained in unbroken line in that vicinity, came there from St. Mary's County, Maryland, and was the same as is traceable in the Maryland Archives back to 1642 in the same place.  He appears there to have been assessed 50 lbs. of tobacco in July 1642, to support the war against the susquehanna Indians (Md. Assy. Proceedings V. 2-30/2 Entry Book #53) and again as a freeholder represented in the Assembly by Capt. Thos. Cornwallis on 22 august 1642 (Md. Arch. Acts of Assy. V. I-165).  On 24 February 1647 he was defendant in a suit of Mrs Mary Brent in which he was decreed to pay her 400 lbs. of Tobacco (Md. Arch. IV-330).  On the 6 April 1648 Andrew Monroe signed with his mark as witness a deed of gift from Burgess Thomas Sutrman to his son John Sturman to all his cattle and his shallop 'now in Maryland.' (Ib. 362). On 6 April 1648 Andrew Munrowe of Appomattox in Virginia (a point on the Potomac across the river from St. Mary's, Md.) made a bill of sale for a feifer 2 years old to Thos. Sturman which was witnessed by John sturman (Ib-383).  It is likely, if not certain, that Andrew Monroe went to Virginia from Maryland in 1647, with Thomas Youell and Thomas Sturman. These two men originally steeled in Kent isle in the Chesapeake--1st claimed by Col. Wm. Clayburn of the Virginia Council who settled it in 1634 or earlier but was in 1638 dispossessed by Lord Calvery.  In 1647/8 Thomas Sturman and Andrew Monroe left St. Mary's and settled near Youell in Westmoreland. county.  John Sturman later also crossed into Virginia where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Patrick & Dorcas Spence, the sister of Elanor Spence, who married Andrew the 2nd, son of Andrew the 1st, the Immigrant.
 
........
 
The following is taken for the History & Register of the Colonial Dames of Virginia, page 497, and is basis for Colonial Dame Claim:--"andrew Monroe of Md. born in Scotland in___and died in Virginia 1668.  Resided in Va. & Md. 1642-1668.  Member of the Maryland Association, 1642. Captain of a ship under Cuthbert Fenwick."
 
..........
 
In the preceding paragraphs we have tried to give as much evidence as possible in regard to the identity & derivation of the immigrant Monroe. In brief, it will be noted that there are two schools of thought among most Monroe genealogists--(1) those that think him to be the son of David & Agnes (Munro) Munro of scotland, fought in the Battle of Preston with rank of Majoy, 1648, was banished & came to Virginia where he settled; (2) those that think him to be of undetermined derivation, first appearing in St. Mary's county, Md., in 1642, & later, about 1647/8, moving across the Potomac River to Westmoreland Co., Va., where he settled & died.
 
However, it is the opinion of the writers that these two Andrew Monroes are identical; that is that Andrew Monroe, the 3rd son of David Munro of Ktgewell & Anges Munro, his wife, came first ot America about 1642 & settled in St. Mary's Co., Md., where he lived & we find record of him, moving about 2647 to Virginia & living at Appomattox, Westmoreland Co., until about April, 1648, when (as intimated in the quotation from Lund Washington) he returned to Scotland, fought in the Battle of Preston with the rank of Major on 17th Aug. 1648, where he was taken prisoner & banished to Virginia--again settling in Westmoreland Co., where he died in 1668
O'Cathan (Ocaan..various spellings) Prince of Fermangh
 
The Monroe or Munro family was founded by Ocaan, Prince of Fermangh, chief of a clan of Scots who, in the 4th Century, had been driven by the Romans into Ireland.  Ocaan dwelt by lough Foyle, on the Roe water, about 1000 A.D., from whence the name Munro (Man from Roe), is derived
Andrew Monroe was the 3rd son of David Munro.  Andrew, under his distinguished relative, General Sir George Munro I, of Newcome, fought with the rank of Major at the Battle of Preston, 17 August, 1648.  Andrew was taken prisoner and banished to Virginia, America.  Andrew managed to escape (or worked off his indentureship) and settled in Northumberland Co., Virginia, where he had several grants of land made to him, the first extending to 200 acres, designated as one of the "Head Rights", being dated 8 Jan. 1650.  Andrew died, leaving issue (according to Westmoreland Deed Book) as listed on the Family Page.  (??"Moved from Scotland to Maryland c.1641, to Virginia, c.1648, and settled on Monroe Bay, Westmoreland County, Virginia)...(Major Monroe was born in Scotland, & came to Maryland before 1642 when he represented St. Mary's Co. in the Assembly.  In 1648, due to religious troubles, he crossed the Potomac & seated himself in Westmoreland, and there received large patents on that creek now called Monroe Bay).
 
Andrew began to write the name Munroe and it finally attained its present form, Monroe
 
One source states: " Andrew (Munro) Monroe was a vicar/preacher who came to America in 1642.
Andrew Munro was married to Elizabeth Alexander.  They had six children. Andrew's brother William was the great grandfather of James Monroe, the fifth President of the USA."
.......
This same??? "Andrew Monroe emigrated from Scotland to America in 1650; he belonged to an ancient highland clan and was Captain in the service of Charles I.  He received a grant of land on the borders of Monroe's Creek (so-called after the family) about one mile below Bluff Point and about four miles from Pope's Creek (where Washington was born) on the Potomac in Northumbefrland County.  In the time of Charles II he retgurned to Scotland and induced others of his family to emigrate and another extensive grant of land in the same quarter was made to him by the Crown."
.......
On page 480 of MacKenzie's History is stated "Andrew, 3rd son of David Monro, fought with rank of Major at battle of Preston (Lancashire) 17th Aug. 1648.  Was taken prisoner there and banished to Virginia, America. He escaped and settled in Northumberland County, Virginia, where he had a grant of 200 acres land dated 8th June 1650.  He married and had issue, from whom President James Monroe was probably descended."
 
...................
 
QUOTE: from Mr. James D. Evans, a descendant of the Monroe family, and an ardent student of genealogy:--"The identity & derivation of the immigrant, the 1st Andrew Monroe, has not, I think, been settled by the assumption that he was indubitably the Major Andrew Monroe, 3rd son of David Munro of Scotland who participated in the Battle of Preston and being taken prisoner by the English (1648) was banished to Virginia.  The article which appears in the William and Mary quarterly, written by Mr. Edward S. lewis of St. Louis, which attempts to substantiate that identity is by no means conclusive.  It presents nothing more than an interesting conjecture but no evidence except indentity of name.  There is very positive proof that Andrew Monroe who appeared in Virginia and westmoreland county in 1650 and patented lands on what later became known as Monroe's Creek, and who can be none other than the first of the Monroes who for generations remained in unbroken line in that vicinity, came there from St. Mary's County, Maryland, and was the same as is traceable in the Maryland Archives back to 1642 in the same place.  He appears there to have been assessed 50 lbs. of tobacco in July 1642, to support the war against the susquehanna Indians (Md. Assy. Proceedings V. 2-30/2 Entry Book #53) and again as a freeholder represented in the Assembly by Capt. Thos. Cornwallis on 22 august 1642 (Md. Arch. Acts of Assy. V. I-165).  On 24 February 1647 he was defendant in a suit of Mrs Mary Brent in which he was decreed to pay her 400 lbs. of Tobacco (Md. Arch. IV-330).  On the 6 April 1648 Andrew Monroe signed with his mark as witness a deed of gift from Burgess Thomas Sutrman to his son John Sturman to all his cattle and his shallop 'now in Maryland.' (Ib. 362). On 6 April 1648 Andrew Munrowe of Appomattox in Virginia (a point on the Potomac across the river from St. Mary's, Md.) made a bill of sale for a feifer 2 years old to Thos. Sturman which was witnessed by John sturman (Ib-383).  It is likely, if not certain, that Andrew Monroe went to Virginia from Maryland in 1647, with Thomas Youell and Thomas Sturman. These two men originally steeled in Kent isle in the Chesapeake--1st claimed by Col. Wm. Clayburn of the Virginia Council who settled it in 1634 or earlier but was in 1638 dispossessed by Lord Calvery.  In 1647/8 Thomas Sturman and Andrew Monroe left St. Mary's and settled near Youell in Westmoreland. county.  John Sturman later also crossed into Virginia where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Patrick & Dorcas Spence, the sister of Elanor Spence, who married Andrew the 2nd, son of Andrew the 1st, the Immigrant.
 
........
 
The following is taken for the History & Register of the Colonial Dames of Virginia, page 497, and is basis for Colonial Dame Claim:--"andrew Monroe of Md. born in Scotland in___and died in Virginia 1668.  Resided in Va. & Md. 1642-1668.  Member of the Maryland Association, 1642. Captain of a ship under Cuthbert Fenwick."
 
..........
 
In the preceding paragraphs we have tried to give as much evidence as possible in regard to the identity & derivation of the immigrant Monroe. In brief, it will be noted that there are two schools of thought among most Monroe genealogists--(1) those that think him to be the son of David & Agnes (Munro) Munro of scotland, fought in the Battle of Preston with rank of Majoy, 1648, was banished & came to Virginia where he settled; (2) those that think him to be of undetermined derivation, first appearing in St. Mary's county, Md., in 1642, & later, about 1647/8, moving across the Potomac River to Westmoreland Co., Va., where he settled & died.
 
However, it is the opinion of the writers that these two Andrew Monroes are identical; that is that Andrew Monroe, the 3rd son of David Munro of Ktgewell & Anges Munro, his wife, came first ot America about 1642 & settled in St. Mary's Co., Md., where he lived & we find record of him, moving about 2647 to Virginia & living at Appomattox, Westmoreland Co., until about April, 1648, when (as intimated in the quotation from Lund Washington) he returned to Scotland, fought in the Battle of Preston with the rank of Major on 17th Aug. 1648, where he was taken prisoner & banished to Virginia--again settling in Westmoreland Co., where he died in 1668.
William Munro of Foulis played a priminent part in public affairs in the north, and was knighted by James IV.  In 1501, in some "official" capacity, he led a composite force of Munros, Dingwalls, and McCullochs to attack Hector Roy Mackenzie of Gairloch at Druim-a-Chait, near Strathpeffer.  Mackenzie chronicles have claimed a signal victory. Whatever the truth, the very next year the Munro Chief was commanded to proceed to Lochaber on that hazardous ploy, "the King's business." There, in 1505, he was slain by Lochiel.
     William Munro, 12th Baron of Foulis led in the unfortunate Battle of Druim-a-Chait (north side of Knock Farrel) in 1501. William Munro was killed in 1505 in a raid while assisting Chief of MacKays.William Munro, 12th Baron of foulis, led the  Clan in the unfortunate Battle of Druim-aChait, (north side of Knock Farrel), in 1501.  William was killed, in 1505, in a raid, while assisting the Chief of McKays. William had the honour of being knighted, and nominated Justiciary of Inverness by James IV.
 
William Munro's signature is the 1st signature to appear  on the
List: MUNRO OF FOULIS: SIGNATURES. This list is located in the museum of the Munro Castle Foulis, Inverness, Scotland.
George Munro, 10th Baron Foulis received confirmation of lands of a "great extent" under the Great Seal of James I, dated at St. Andrews in 1426.  "He is also recognized as George Munro of Foulis in charters of 1437-38-39-40 and 1449".  It was during the life of George that the Battle of Beallach-nam Brog (1452) was fought.   The Chief, George Munro, his oldest son, George, , and a great number of the Chief's followers, were slain.  George married (1) Isabel, daughter of ross of Balnagowan. Their son, George, was, as noted above,  slain, with his father, in the Battle of Beallach-nam Brog, in 1452. George, and his eldest son, were fighting on the behalf of John of the Isles, eleventh Earl of Ross. George also married (2) Christen, daughter of John McCulloch, of Plaids. George and Christen had 3 sons: John (who became the 11th Baron Foulis, Hugh (died unmarried) & William (died unmarried).
 
George Munro succeeded his father in 1425 at the 10th Baron Fowlis. It is from thes 10th baron the the Munro's of Lexington, Concord, Woburn, Worchester, NY, PA. Bristol RI, Ohio, Paris, France, and hundreds of otherr places are descended in direct succession.  In 1452 the locally famous battle between the Mackenzies and the Munros, which is known as Beallach-nam-Brog, of the Pass of the Shoes, so named because the combatants, to protect themselves from one another's arrows, took off their shoes and tied them on as breastplates.  It seems that the  Euphemia, Countess Dowager of Ross, who had given much land to Baron George's father, fell deeply in love with Alexander Mackenzie, Lord of Kintail.  He was already plighted to Macdougall's daughter and he very properly and firmly refused her.  She then invited him to her castle at Dingwall, and, upon his again declining to marry her, cast him into prison.  This turbulent old vixen then tortured the young man's page until he have up to her the ring which was agreed token to be sent by Mackenzie to his vassal, Maccauley, governor of Ellandonnan, permitting the latter to leave that stronghold.  The old countess then sent one of her gentlemen, armed wigh this ring, to Macauley with a message to the effect that his master was about to wed her, and that the stronghold of Ellandonnan was to be given into her handsw.  Seeing the rign, he obeyed the supposed order, but soon found that, instead of being a bridegroom, his master was a prisoner.  Thereupon he loitered under the dungeon window until the young man found opportunity to make sighn that the only way of effecting his release would be to kidnap the countess's cousin, Walter Ross, and hold him as hostage.  This the rest of the Mackenzie family, only too ready for a fight, promplly did, and hurrried the luckless cousin off into the mountains beyond Inverness.  The Earl of Ross, dutiful son of the countess, immediately sent word to Lord Lovat of the capture of his cousin, and his lordship thereupon despatched 200 men to the rescue.  They were joined by all the Ross vassals, including the Munros, and the qursuit of the Mackenzies, with their prisoner, Walter Ross, began.  Overtaken at Beallach-nam-Brog, there ensued one of the bloddiest battles of this savage Scotch history, the Munros and Mackenzies gladly seizing this opportunity to pay off many an ancient score.  The sub-clan of Dingwall was literally extinguished, 140 of its men being killed, and, according to Sir Robert Gordon, "there were slain 11 Munroes of the House of Fowlis that were to succeed one after another, so that the succession fell into a child then lying in his cradle, John."George Munro, 10th Baron of Foulis.  Under the Great Seal of James I, dated at St. Andrews, 1426, lands of great extent were confirmed to him. "He is also recognized as George Munro of Foulis in charters of 1437-38-39-40 and 1449".  It was during the life of George, the Battle of Beallach-nam Brog (1452) was fought.  The Chief, George Munro, his oldest son, and a great number of his followers were slain.  He married (1) Isabel, daughter of Ross of Balnagowan.  they had George (slain in above battle).  He married (2) christen, daughter of John McCulloch of Plaids. They had John (who became the 11th Baron of Foulis).  High and William (died unmarried) (sic).
X III - George died 1452 (sic)
Hugh Monro, 9th Baron Foulis, married (1) Isabella, daughter of John Keith, son of Sir Edward Keith.
He married (2) Margaret, daughter of Nicholas, son of Kenneth, 4th Earl of sougherland, brother of William the 5th Earl of Sougherland.  The first marriage to Isabella  produced a son, George.  The 2nd marriage, to Margaret produced the children John, Janet, & Elizabeth.  Hugh joined the Lord of Isles in contest with the duke of Albany in 1411. Hugh was rewarded with new grants of land through the crown-influence of the rosses, but Hugh appears to have attached himself to the MacDonalds, ehen they claimed the ross Earldom against the royal will, at the commencement of the  15th century.
 
"Hugh acquired  more lands, mainly at the hands of his cousin, the Countess Euphemia of Ross".
 
In 1411 Hugh joined the Lord of the Isles in contest with the Duke of albany & died evdentually in 1425.  the lands of the Munro Clan were greatly extended under the Great Seal of James I, at St. Andrews, in 1426, this extension being granted by charters from Euphemia, daughter of William, Earl of Ross, who on her father's death inherited the Earldom.  One of these grants was dated 4th May, 1394 in respect of "Wesstir Fowlys" & the tower of "Strathscheck".  Hugh & his father lived during the time of the capture & 18-year imprisonment of James I (1406-1426) & the 1411 invasion of Donald, Lord of the Isles, Chief of the great Clan Donald.  The final upshot of these years, so far as the Clan Munro was concerned, was the demise of the Earldom on R9oss in June of 1476, it being declared forfeit to the Crown.  Historicall, the Munros had operated, more or less, at the bidding of the Ross Clan.  "By 1452 the Clan may be said to hae come of age, but prior to 1476 it had not shown its ture capabilities for expansion.   Unitl 1475, apart from one brief & clouded interval, all Munros who were not servant of the Church were vassals of successive Earls of Ross..the Munro Chiefs held their lands 'for faithful service rendered or to be rendered'; nor was it easy for them at time to reconcile their service with their wider loyalty they owed to the Scottish Crown".
"The founder of the ancient house of Fowlis, according to the Cowl manuscript, was Donald Munro, the son of O'Cathan, an Irish chief, Prince of Fermanagh.  Donald rendered material aid to King Malcolm II in his contest with the Danes & received therefor certain lands which were subsequently erected into a barony called the Borony of Fowlis---, which has been the chief residence of the House which for nearly 800 years has existed in uninterrupted descent in the male line--a fact said to be unexampled in the annals of Scotland & England."
 
Donald, son of Ocaan, Prince of Fermangh, led his clan back to Scotland, fought for King Malcolm II, A.D. 1025, and at a Parliament at Scone he was granted a Barony, which he named Foyle or Foulis after the Lough from whence he came.
 
Donald Munro was the first Munro to hold land in Scotland.  He received his land at the hands of Malcolm II, for aid given to that king against the Danes.  The land on Alness Water, called Ferindonald (or Donald's land), was subsequently erected into the Barony of Fowlis, and was still in possession of the family in 1900.
 
That Donald was the founder of the House of Foulis is a common error, the grand not being given until more than a century after Donald's death in 1039.
 
Donald is a "shadowy" figure, presumed to be a son of O'Cathain or Okain, an Irish Chief.  an alternative hypothesis is that he was a member of the Siol O'Cain, claimed to be an ancient tribe of North Moray.

See also information on James Monroe, 5th President of the USA


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