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McKay, Donald Bruce Ancestors
Researched and Compiled by Serena Willis to 11 Feb 2002
Thanks to Bruce McKay for sending this in


Generation No. 1

1. Donald Bruce McKay, born December 06, 1959 in Red Deer, AB, CAN. He was the son of 2. Clifford Wesley McKay and 3. Eleanor June Dick.

More About Donald Bruce McKay:
Fact 1: Yukon Metis Federation Membership Application

Generation No. 2

2. Clifford Wesley McKay, born June 14, 1918 in Lilly Plain, SK, CAN. He was the son of 4. Henry Richard "Hillyard" McKay and 5. Sophia Catherine Fidler. He married 3. Eleanor June Dick.

3. Eleanor June Dick, born October 28, 1922 in Ponoka, AB, CAN. She was the daughter of 6. Wilber R Dick and 7. Vada Passmore.

More About Clifford Wesley McKay:
Fact 1: Donald Bruce McKay - YMF member

More About Eleanor June Dick:
Fact 1: Donald Bruce McKay - YMF member

Child of Clifford McKay and Eleanor Dick is:
1 i. Donald Bruce McKay, born December 06, 1959 in Red Deer, AB, CAN.

Generation No. 3

4. Henry Richard "Hillyard" McKay, born April 18, 1892; died July 05, 1980 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN. He was the son of 8. William Charles McKay and 9. Mary McLaughlin. He married 5. Sophia Catherine Fidler 1916.

5. Sophia Catherine Fidler, born September 16, 1895 in St Catherine's District, Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died September 03, 1980 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN. She was the daughter of 10. Peter Charles Fidler and 11. Margaret Swain.

More About Henry Richard "Hillyard" McKay:
Date born 2: April 19, 1892, St Catherine's District, Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN
Died 2: January 06, 1976
Fact 1 1: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001
Fact 1 2: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Donald Bruce McKay - YMF member

More About Sophia Catherine Fidler:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Donald Bruce McKay - YMF member

Child of Henry McKay and Sophia Fidler is:
2 i. Clifford Wesley McKay, born June 14, 1918 in Lilly Plain, SK, CAN; married Eleanor June Dick.

6. Wilber R Dick, born August 31, 1899 in Tracey, MB, CAN. He married 7. Vada Passmore.

7. Vada Passmore, born November 10, 1902 in Illinois, USA.

More About Wilber R Dick:
Fact 1: Donald Bruce McKay - YMF member

More About Vada Passmore:
Fact 1: Donald Bruce McKay - YMF member

Child of Wilber Dick and Vada Passmore is:
3 i. Eleanor June Dick, born October 28, 1922 in Ponoka, AB, CAN; married Clifford Wesley McKay.

Generation No. 4

8. William Charles McKay, born May 31, 1858 in St Andrews Parish, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN; died January 29, 1932 in St Mary's, Prince Albert, SK. CAN. He was the son of 16. John Dougall McKay and 17. Harriet McKay. He married 9. Mary McLaughlin September 13, 1882 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN.

9. Mary McLaughlin, born January 09, 1862; died November 16, 1904. She was the daughter of 18. Peter McLaughlin and 19. Helen Foulds.

Notes for William Charles McKay:
William is identified in the March 1932 edition of The Beaver page 441. In the Beaver his date of death is January 4, 1932 at 73 years of age from Pneumonia. In his early years he did transport work for the BBC and later engaged in farming. He was proficient in several Indian languages and is said to have been able to converse in twelve different Indian dialects. In 1920, at the historical pageant held at Lowere Fort Garry in celebration of the HBC two hundred and fiftyth anniversary, he acted as intertreter for Sir Robert M. Kendersley, who was then Governor of the Company and on a tour of the West.

More About William Charles McKay:
Birth date: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

More About Mary McLaughlin:
Fact 1: source T. C. McCloy Papers

Children of William McKay and Mary McLaughlin are:
i. Mabel Gertrude McKay, born August 07, 1883 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died January 23, 1905 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN.

Notes for Mabel Gertrude McKay:
Mabel Gertrude McKay and her parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows:
"Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1358 , Reel C-14988, Access code: 90

File Title: McKay, Mabel Gertrude; address: Prince Albert, Sask; born: 7 Aug., 1883 at Prince Albert; father: William Charles McKay (Métis); mother: Mary McClaughlin (Métis); scrip cert.: form C, no. 481 for $240.00; claim no. 333 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About Mabel Gertrude McKay:
Burial: St Mary's, Prince Albert,SK, CAN
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 3: see scrip info

ii. Eliza Ellen Harriet McKay, born February 05, 1885 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died December 09, 1949 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN; married William Edward McKay December 09, 1908 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

Notes for Eliza Ellen Harriet McKay:
Eliza Ellen Harriet McKay and her parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows:"Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1358 , Reel C-14988, Access code: 90
File Title: McKay, Eliza Ellen Harriet; address: Prince Albert, Sask; born: 8 Feb., 1885 at Prince Albert; father: William Charles McKay (Métis); mother: Mary McLaughlin (Métis); scrip cert.: form C, no. 479 for $240.00; claim no. 332 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About Eliza Ellen Harriet McKay:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: see scrip info

Notes for William Edward McKay:
William Edward McKay and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1358 , Reel C-14988, Access code: 90
File Title: McKay, Thomas; for his son, William Edward McKay; address:
Prince Albert, Sask; born: 21 Feb., 1874 at Prince Albert, Sask; father: Thomas McKay (Métis & deponent); mother: CaAtherine McBeth (Métis); scrip cert.: form C, no. 649 for $240.00; claim no.441 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About William Edward McKay:
Baptism: March 17, 1872, from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 1: source John Hunter
Fact 2: Source 1. Little Bearskin McKay Clan-on-line Canada Tree
Fact 3: from Stan's Sinclair FTM Nov 1998
Fact 4: MF page 773
Fact 5: April 09, 1871, Bonnie has as birthdate
Fact 6: see scrip info

iii. Charles Douglas McKay, born December 24, 1886 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died May 19, 1980 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN; married Gladys Ellen Bear January 11, 1929 in John Smith Reserve, SK, CAN.

More About Charles Douglas McKay:
Burial: St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

More About Gladys Ellen Bear:
Fact 1 1: Furtrade Database-1999
Fact 1 2: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: there are some problems with the birthdates of Gladys and her parents

iv. Peter Lawrence McKay, born March 26, 1888 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died October 21, 1892 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN.

More About Peter Lawrence McKay:
Burial: St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan
Fact 1: Source John Hunter

v. William Colin McKay, born August 02, 1890 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died December 04, 1956 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN; married Elsie Evelyn Jackson April 19, 1926 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

More About William Colin McKay:
Burial: St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan
Fact 1: source John Hunter
Fact 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 3: MF page 769

More About Elsie Evelyn Jackson:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: MF page 769

vi. Sedley Miles McKay, born March 26, 1893 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died January 09, 1906 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN.

More About Sedley Miles McKay:
Fact 1: source John Hunter

vii. Robert Stanley McKay, born February 25, 1894 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died July 03, 1970; married (1) Julia Florence McKay; married (2) Mary Isabel Hodgson.

More About Robert Stanley McKay:
Fact 1: source John Hunter

More About Julia Florence McKay:
Burial: at St Mary's, Portage la Prairie
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: conflict in whether St Mary, PA or Portage la Prairie
Fact 3: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 4: Gail Morin's book page 243

More About Mary Isabel Hodgson:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

viii. Julia Florence McKay, born January 29, 1896; died October 16, 1936.

More About Julia Florence McKay:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter

ix. Hugh John Finlayson McKay, born November 21, 1899 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan; died September 23, 1907 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

More About Hugh John Finlayson McKay:
Fact 1: source John Hunter

x. Percy McLaughlin McKay, born November 19, 1901 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan; died June 06, 1983.

More About Percy McLaughlin McKay:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter

xi. Herbert Nelson McKay, born March 18, 1904; died October 28, 1988.

More About Herbert Nelson McKay:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: living in 1996
Fact 3: Copied from McKay Family Circle (1858-1970) as presented to Charles Douglas McKay, Dec 24, 1970 Original Circle by GWRS with additions September, 1981

4 xii. Henry Richard "Hillyard" McKay, born April 18, 1892; died July 05, 1980 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN; married Sophia Catherine Fidler 1916.

10. Peter Charles Fidler, born July 12, 1850 in Pembina District, Minnesota Territory, USA; died March 13, 1941 in St Catherine's District, NWT = SK, CAN. He was the son of 20. Peter P Fidler and 21. Jane Lambert. He married 11. Margaret Swain July 07, 1875 in Holy Trinity, Headingly, MB, CAN.

11. Margaret Swain, born July 15, 1860 in Headingly, MB, CAN; died August 18, 1943 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN. She was the daughter of 22. Thomas Swain and 23. Ellen (Nellie) Bremner.

More About Peter Charles Fidler:
Burial: March 16, 1941, St Catherine's Anglican, Prince Albert, SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher shows him as Peach Ass <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

Notes for Margaret Swain:
Margaret is identified in MF pages 5, 359 and 1159. She is buried in Aug 1943 at St Catherines, Saskatchewan. Her parents are identified as Pierre Parenteau and Ellen Bremner. This information will have to be confirmed. (Stan's Notes)

More About Margaret Swain:
Burial: St Catherine's Anglican, Prince Albert, SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000

Children of Peter Fidler and Margaret Swain are:

i. Charles Thomas Fidler, born January 01, 1877 in St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK; died October 02, 1955; married Florence "Flossy" Halcro in St Catherine's Anglican Church, SK, CAN.

More About Charles Thomas Fidler:
Burial: St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, Charles and Flossy in MF page 360

More About Florence "Flossy" Halcro:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

ii. Mary Margaret Fidler, born October 04, 1878 in Headingly District, MB, CAN; died March 21, 1970 in St Catherine's District, NWT = SK, CAN; married Charles Thomas Adams January 07, 1903 in St Paul's Anglican Church, Lindsay, CAN.

More About Mary Margaret Fidler:
Burial: St Catherine's District, NWT = SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 5 and 360
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

More About Charles Thomas Adams:
Burial 1: Stan shows St Paul, Lindsay, SK, CAN
Burial 2: Eileen Horan Researcher shows burial at St Catherine's Anglican North West <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 5 and 360

iii. Alexander Peter (Sandy) Fidler, born September 17, 1880 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; died October 25, 1965 in Flin Flon, MB, CAN; married Flora Mabel Adams February 21, 1905 in St Paul's Anglican Church, Lindsay, CAN.

Notes for Alexander Peter (Sandy) Fidler:
Stan's Notes:
Alexander is identified in MF page 5 as "Alexander Peter Fidler, b: 19 Jul 1880, d: 28 Jun 1965." On page 360 he is identified as "Alexander Peter "Sandy" Fidler, b: 17 Sept 1880, d: 25 Oct 1965." If the two enterieds are for the same person the information will have to be verified. Alexander Peter Fidler is identified with his parents in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1346 , Reel C-14968, Access code: 90
File Title: Fidler, Alexander Peter; address: St. Catherine, Sask; claim no. 348; born: 12 Sept., 1880 at St. Catherines, Sask; father: Peter Fidler (Métis); mother: Margaret Swain (Métis); scrip cert.: form C, no. 531 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About Alexander Peter (Sandy) Fidler:
Burial: St Catherine's Anglican, Prince Albert, SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: see scrip info

Notes for Flora Mabel Adams:
Stan's Notes:
Flora is identified in MF page 5 with a year of death of 1959, she is identified on page 360 with a year of death of 1930. The information will have to be confirmed.

More About Flora Mabel Adams:
Burial: St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000

iv. Anna Bella Fidler, born November 18, 1882 in St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK; died July 31, 1961; married William John Miller December 22, 1902 in Brides Home, St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

Notes for Anna Bella Fidler:
Anna Bella Fidler and her parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1346 , Reel C-14968, Access code: 90
File Title: Fidler, Anna Bella; address: St. Catherines, Sask; claim no. 349; born: 18 Nov., 1882 at St. Catherines; father: Peter Fidler (Métis); mother: Margaret Swain (Métis); scrip cert.: form C, no. 521 for $240.00  Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About Anna Bella Fidler:
Burial: August 1961, Crescent Park, Carrot River, SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 360
Fact 2: see scrip info

More About William John Miller:
Burial: September 1942, Crescent Park, Carrot River, SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 360

v. Leonhanorah Fidler, born November 28, 1884 in St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK; married William "Billy" Brown.

More About Leonhanorah Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher as Laura Fidler <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

More About William "Billy" Brown:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

vi. Sarah Ellen Fidler, born December 04, 1886 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; died March 06, 1970 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

More About Sarah Ellen Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

vii. Emma Jane Fidler, born October 24, 1888 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; married Rudolph Scott June 28, 1911.

More About Emma Jane Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 360 shows June and Rudloph
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher as Emma Jane <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

More About Rudolph Scott:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

viii. James Flett Fidler, born August 24, 1890 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; died December 06, 1944 in St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK; married Mary McDonald Abt. 1910.

More About James Flett Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 360 shows James and Mary
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

More About Mary McDonald:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

ix. Mabel Fidler, born Aft. 1892; married Charles Smith.

More About Mabel Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF shows Mabel and Charles on page 360

x. William Alfred Fidler, born September 15, 1893 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; died May 21, 1969 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

More About William Alfred Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

xi. Florence Jessie Fidler, born Aft. 1895 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; married George Couldwell Abt. 1916 in St Mary's Anglican Church, Lily Plain District, SK, CAN.

More About Florence Jessie Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

More About George Couldwell:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Researcher <ileanonu@home.com> Sept 18, 2001

xii. Samuel David Fidler, born February 09, 1898 in St Catherines, Prince Albert, SK; died February 17, 1976 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

More About Samuel David Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000

5 xiii. Sophia Catherine Fidler, born September 16, 1895 in St Catherine's District, Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died September 03, 1980 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN; married Henry Richard "Hillyard" McKay 1916.

Generation No. 5

16. John Dougall McKay, born January 07, 1827 in Rainy Lake; died December 24, 1893 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada. He was the son of 32. William McKay and 33. Julie Chalifoux. He married 17. Harriet McKay April 24, 1856.

17. Harriet McKay, born July 06, 1835 in Fort Ellice, Northwest Territories; died February 12, 1913 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada. She was the daughter of 34. John Richards McKay and 35. Harriet Ballenden.

Notes for John Dougall McKay:
Of interest to many might be the story of John Dougal McKay. the son of William McKay and the grandson of Donald McKay. John Dougal McKay is reported to be the grandson of John McKay/Mary Favell's brother Donald McKay. (we are still trying hard to verify they were in fact brothers). This is by Herbert Nelson McKay.(his grandson). He was called John Dougal, to identify him from the other John McKays. When he was 16 he was sent to England for more education in bookkeeping and carpenter training. On completion of his apprenticeship, he returned to Canada by boat via the Hudson Bay. On the voyage out, the ships purser died. The Captain knew John Dougal had bookkeeping training, so he was appointed Purser and was in charge of the ships records. He would collect the money for goods brought out from England and be in charge of all goods on the return trip. The job meant he had to return to England and come out the following year to work for the Hudson Bay Company. He married Harriet McKay, the daughter of John Richards McKay, and they are reported to have been 2nd cousins. They went to Portage la Prarie and in 1881, they moved to Prince Albert. He opened a store in partnership with his son William Charles that was located about 6 miles west of town.

Two of his sons went to the Yukon during the Gold Rush days. John Dougal passed away in 1893.Harriet great church worker, she also did beautiful bead work on leather. A sample of her work is in the Prince Albert Museum. Harriet passed away Feb. 12, 1913. Their children were Joseph McKay who married Flora A. McKay, William Charles,McKay, Julia McKay who married James Cusitor, Henry Malcom Watt McKay, who took cattle to the Yukon,Francis Mckay who joined the Northwest Mounted Police and is buried on the line between Alaska and the Yukon, Harriet Ann Mckay who married Walter Traill(retired to Victoria). John Dougal and Harriet also raised a pair of orphan twin boys named Willie and Jacob Beads.

More About John Dougall McKay:
Burial: at St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: FMN ID 3615, as Metis, Protestant
Fact 3: Gail Morin's book page 768, 780 and 781

More About Harriet McKay:
Burial: February 14, 1913, St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 768, 780 & 781
Fact 3: married by contract

Children of John McKay and Harriet McKay are:
i. Joseph McKay, born July 12, 1856 in St Andrews, RRS; died December 12, 1938 in St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada; married Flora Ann McKay March 30, 1887 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Notes for Joseph McKay:
Subject: Joe McKay
Date: Thu, 17 Jun 1999 22:20:41 -0700
From: John Hunter <jay@cnx.net>
To: metisgen@listserv.northwest.com

He was a son of John Dougal Mckay and Harriet Mckay. John Dougal Mckay would be a first cousin 1 generation removed to John Richards Mckay, and Harriet was John Richards Mckay's daughter.

So it is like your cousin's son marrying your daughter.... Anyway, Joseph Mckay's born 1842, the youngest of John Richards Mckay's sons, married Flavie Poitras, and their daughter, Ann Flora married Joseph (Gentleman Joe) Mckay's, a son of his sister Harriet and John Dougal Mckay's ( his second cousin) In any case this Gentleman Joe Mckay's was very involved in the Riel Rebellion at Batoche.

"Riel viewed his mission as part of a larger aboriginal struggle and believed the Indians, victimized by a decade of government parsimony and intransigence, would jump at the opportunity to extract revenge. But the Indian leaders had their own agenda for addressing the grievances and were pinning their hopes on a large intertribal council at Duck Lake that summer.

Chief Beardy refused to be drawn into Riels's gambit, and he deeply regretted the resort to arms- and what it might mean to Indian diplomatic efforts. He was deeply worried about what might happen to his own people.Chief Beardy's reserve was located between Batoche and Carlton, and all he could do was counsel restraint and try to keep out intruders.

Assiyiwin, one of Beardy's four headmen learned the Metis and the NW Police were probably meet outside Duck Lake. He tied his goods on his pony and started home on foot, hurrying as best he good despite his poor eyesight. The reserve was not far, and he soon heard excited voices. He could not make out any figures. "Stop! Don't you know what is going on here?" a voice in Cree challenged the old man.It was "Gentleman Joe Mckay's, the Police interpreter. "No, I am blind," replied Assiyiwin. "Tell me what is going on?" Mckay's could hardly contain his annoyance with the old indian. " There is going to be trouble here. Go back to where you came from.

Assiyiwin had innocently walked into the middle of the unfolding drama. Earlier that morning, Superintendent Leif Crozier had set off rashly for Duck Lake with one hundred Police and Civilian volunteers to prevent guns from falling into the hands of Riel's supporters. As they headed out from Carlton they entered Chief Beardy's reserve, where Crozier stopped to talk to Chief Beardy who confirmed he was not joining Riel. As the force headed towards Duck Lake they spotted about 20 Metis horseman led by Gabriel Dumont and quickly took a defensive position. Gabriel sent his brother Isidore to stall the police and when he reached Assiyiwin and Mckay's, the pair were arguing. The old man was indignant that the Police had intruded on the reserve and flatly told Mckay's, " If you are going to have a battle, if you are going to spill blood, you cannot do it on our reserve land. Mckay once again ordered him to go back, but the unarmed Indian stood there with his horse and said "NO, I am going home." Mckay's then threw his coat on the ground and said " Step over my coat..and I will shoot you." Assiyiwin had once been a powerful warrior- one of his most prized possessions was a small box of Blackfoot scalps- and he was not about to back down from anybody. He grabbed Mckay's rifle and as the two men struggled- Isisdore shouted "Don't shoot each other. We want to work this out peacefully. We don't want anybody killed."

It was too late, Mckay's, sensing this parley was only a ruse for an ambush, pulled out his revolver and shot Isidore Dumont in the head, killing him instantly. He then turned his revolver on the unarmed Assiyiwin and mortally wounded him in the stomach. At the sound of gunfire, shooting erupted from both sides. The casualties mounted by the minute, and it quickly became apparent the Metis held the upper hand- especially since dozens of men, including Riel armed only with a crucifix, poured in from Batoche.

Assiyiwin's death, the battle on Beardy's Reserve, and the presence of a handful of Willow Cree among the Metis fighters pointed to an Indian-Metis alliance- an assumption the country's newspapers reached immediately, and this persists to this day."

Loyal to Death ( Indians and the North-West Rebellion) Blair Stonechild & Bill Waiser

Fifth House Publishers
#9-6125- 11th Street SE
Calgary AB
T2H 2L6

More About Joseph McKay:
Baptism: May 19, 1865, at St Francois Xavier, RRS
Burial: St. Mary's, Prince Albert, SASK, CAN
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 3: MF page 781
Fact 4: Known as 'Gentleman Joe'
Fact 5: married his cousin
Fact 6: Bonnie's database, Jan 15, 1999

More About Flora Ann McKay:
Baptism: June 05, 1869
Burial: St. Mary's, Prince Albert, SASK, CAN
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 3: MF pages 768 & 781
Fact 4: Bonnie's database, Jan 15, 1999

8 ii. William Charles McKay, born May 31, 1858 in St Andrews Parish, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN; died January 29, 1932 in St Mary's, Prince Albert, SK. CAN; married Mary McLaughlin September 13, 1882 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN.

iii. George Alexander McKay, born 1861 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada; died January 01, 1862 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada.

More About George Alexander McKay:
Baptism: June 10, 1861, at St Mary's, Portage la Prairie
Burial: February 01, 1862, at St Mary's, Portage la Prairie
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 770

iv. John James McKay, born March 03, 1866 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada; died November 13, 1875 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada.

More About John James McKay:
Burial: at St Mary's, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
Fact 1: source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin's book page 770

v. Henry Malcolm Watt McKay, born December 09, 1867 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada; died June 30, 1906 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada.

More About Henry Malcolm Watt McKay:
Burial: at St Mary's Prince, Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
Fact 1: source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: 1898, -took cattle to Yukon during the Gold Rush
Fact 3: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 4: Gail Morin's book page 770

vi. Mabel McKay, born Abt. 1870; died 1870.

vii. Francis 'Frank' McKay, born March 02, 1870 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada; died June 05, 1907 in Yukon River, Yukon, Canada.

More About Francis 'Frank' McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Member of Northwest Mounted Police and died in their employ
Fact 3: buried on border between Canada & USA

viii. Harriet Anne McKay, born April 18, 1872 in Portage la Prairie, MB, CAN; died March 09, 1948 in Victoria, BC, CAN; married Walter Traill January 09, 1895 in Prince Albert, SK, CAN.

More About Harriet Anne McKay:
Baptism: May 12, 1872, at St Mary's, Portage la Prairie
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers and Douglas Munroe, rec'd Feb 13, 2001
Fact 2: John Hunter has Harriet McKay b 1865 d 1936?
Fact 3: from Stan's Sinclair FTM Nov 1998
Fact 4: Gail Morin MF pag 770

Notes for Walter Traill:
Subject: Fort Ellice
Date: Mon, 31 May 1999 22:44:16 -0700
From: John Hunter <jay@cnx.net>
To: metisgen@listserv.northwest.com

Memoirs of Walter Traill "In Ruperts Land"

Excerpt:

The only trouble I knew of was when a party of Sioux came.Our local Indians the Cree and the Saulteaux, have been at war with them ever since they crossed the line and located in the Woody Mountain district after their massacre of the white people in Minnesota in 62. Our Indians had sent a messenger to invite them to come to hold a Treaty of Peace and to bury the hatchet. They were royally entertained with feasts of dog soup, fish, and a Treaty was signed but this proved of short duration. At daybreak the Saulteaux made a raid on their camp and scalped 17 while the rest made ahasty retreat. This caused quite a stir as some of the Saullteaux had been intermarried with the Sioux. Among the half breeds the feelings were running really high, one Francois Desmarais, who is connected by marriage to the Sioux was in the trading store while I was there.

An Indian came in with an antelope skin and began to negotiate for a sack of vermillion paint in exchange for the skin, though he still wore red war paint and colours on those parts of his anatomy not covered by his red blanket, breech clout and beaded moccasins. An eagle feather in his head, he had at his waist as further evidence of his bravery a scalping knife with a fresh sioux scalp dangling from it.

The transaction was completed but without a sound, Desmarais seized the Saulteaux knife and cut him open to the waist so swiftly that our clerk did not see what happened until the unfortunate customer returned to trade the now useless paint for some cloth to tie himself together. When the clerk finally understood, the Indian opened the blanket held tightly around, and thereby his whole interior fell out on the floor to be instantly covered by his body. In a few seconds his soul was with his late victims that is the mystical hunting grounds of all Indian braves.

His murderer was immediately put in Gaol and afterwards tried for murder and sentenced to be hung, however a deputation of Francois friends and relatives waited upon the Governor and the sentence was changed to Life and he was to be sent to some sort of penal colony in the Yellowhead Pass where undesirable are deported and where they seem to regain their liberty at a safe distance from the Settlement. Sometime later Walter was amazed to find that Francois was assigned to him as a guide.

"Further on there is mention of the Iroquois (Mohawk families that came from Montreal and Upper State New York, and also that over 30 Sioux women were working at Fort Ellice,"

Interesting reading,

Jay- moderator

More About Walter Traill:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Source T. C. McCloy Papers and Douglas Munroe, rec'd Feb 13, 2001

ix. Edward Archibald McKay, born 1874.

More About Edward Archibald McKay:
Baptism: July 19, 1874, St Mary's Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 770
Fact 3: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998

x. Florence Louise McKay, born 1877; died 1878.

More About Florence Louise McKay:
Baptism: August 26, 1877, at St Mary's, Portage la Prairie
Burial: August 24, 1878, at St Mary's, Portage la Prairie
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: birth & death dates from Stan's FTM Nov 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin's book page 770

xi. George Angus McKay, born 1878; died January 05, 1883.

More About George Angus McKay:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: birth & death dates from Stan's FTM Nov 1998

xii. Gertrude Jane McKay, born 1882 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada; died April 04, 1882 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada.

More About Gertrude Jane McKay:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin's book page 770

18. Peter McLaughlin. He married 19. Helen Foulds.

19. Helen Foulds.

More About Peter McLaughlin:
Fact 1: source John Hunter

More About Helen Foulds:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter

Children of Peter McLaughlin and Helen Foulds are:

9 i. Mary McLaughlin, born January 09, 1862; died November 16, 1904; married William Charles McKay September 13, 1882 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN.

ii. Michael McLaughlin, born August 04, 1863; married Jane Mary Adams in Lindsay, SK, CAN.

More About Michael McLaughlin:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 4, 790 and 911.

More About Jane Mary Adams:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 4, 790 and 911.

20. Peter P Fidler, born March 15, 1824 in St John's, RRS; died 1901 in SK, CAN. He was the son of 40. Charles Fidler and 41. Anne Saunders. He married 21. Jane Lambert February 17, 1860 in Trinity, Headingly, MB, CAN.

21. Jane Lambert, born Abt. 1832; died June 1870. She was the daughter of 42. Etienne Lambert and 43. Catherine Gaddy.

Notes for Peter P Fidler:
Peter Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada. In this reference his mother is shown as Jane Sanderson, this will need to be confirmed. "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90 File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Peter; born: 15 March 1825; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Jane Fidler (nee Sanderson, Métis); claim no.: 1569; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Peter P Fidler:
Baptised: October 18, 1824, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 359, 621, 1159 and 1160
Fact 2: mother shown as Jane Sanderson in scrip info
Fact 3: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Jane Lambert:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 359, 621 and 1159

Notes for Therese Elizabeth Swain:
Therese is identified in MF pages 359 and 1160. She is also identified in the National Archives Scrip Records as follows: "Reference: RG15, INTERIOR, Series D-II-8-a, Volume 1320, Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Theresa (nee Swain), wife of Peter Fidler; born: 1845; father: John Swain; mother: Mary Swain Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Therese Elizabeth Swain:
Fact 1: see scrip info

Children of Peter Fidler and Jane Lambert are:

10 i. Peter Charles Fidler, born July 12, 1850 in Pembina District, Minnesota Territory, USA; died March 13, 1941 in St Catherine's District, NWT = SK, CAN; married Margaret Swain July 07, 1875 in Holy Trinity, Headingly, MB, CAN.

ii. Catherine Fidler, born October 07, 1854 in St James, RRS; married John James Park.

Notes for Catherine Fidler:
Stan Hulme Research: "Catherine is identified in MF pages 360 and 933. On page 360 her date of baptism is given as 21 Nov 1854 and on page 933 it is 21 Nov 1852 at St Andrews, Red River Settlement." Catherine Fidler is also identified with her parents in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Catherine; born: 7 October 1854; father: Peter Fidler; mother: Jane Lambert Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Catherine Fidler:
Fact 1: see scrip info

More About John James Park:
Baptised: January 29, 1857, St Andrews, RRS
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 360 and 932

iii. Susannah Fidler, born Abt. 1855.

More About Susannah Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000

iv. Lois Hannah Fidler, born 1855.

More About Lois Hannah Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska Research 04 Feb 2002

v. Elizabeth Jane Sophia Fidler, born March 05, 1857.

Notes for Elizabeth Jane Sophia Fidler:
Elizabeth Jane Sophia Fidler and her parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15, Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Jane; born: 5 March 1857; father: Peter Fidler; mother: Jane Lambert Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Elizabeth Jane Sophia Fidler:
Baptised: March 13, 1857, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 360
Fact 2: see scrip info

vi. Annabelle Fidler, born May 16, 1858 in Headingly, MB, CAN.

Notes for Annabelle Fidler:
Annabella Fidler and her parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Annabella; born: 16 May 1858; father: Peter Fidler; mother: Jane Lambert Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Annabelle Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 2: see scrip info

vii. William Alfred Fidler, born 1861.

More About William Alfred Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska Research 04 Feb 2002

viii. Dorcas Fidler, born 1865.

More About Dorcas Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska Research 04 Feb 2002

Children of Peter Fidler and Therese Swain are:

i. John Fidler, born 1872.

More About John Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska Research 04 Feb 2002

ii. Henry Fidler, born 1874.

More About Henry Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska Research 04 Feb 2002

iii. Charles Fidler, born September 30, 1875.

More About Charles Fidler:
Baptised: April 02, 1876, Lebret, SK, CAN
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 360

iv. Margaret Jane Fidler, born April 14, 1878 in Regina, SK, CAN; died 1970; married William Vezina.

Notes for Margaret Jane Fidler:
Margaret, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives Scrip Records as follows: "Reference: RG15, INTERIOR, Series D-II-8-c, Volume 1370, Reel C-15008, Access code: 90
File Title: Vezina, Margaret; address: St. Louis; born: 14 April, 1878 at Regina; father: Peter Fidler (Métis); mother: Therese Swain (Métis); scrip cert.: form C, no. 677 for $240; claim no. 459 Finding Aid number: 15-21" (Stan's Notes)

More About Margaret Jane Fidler:
Fact 1: see scrip info

More About William Vezina:
Fact 1: see wife's scrip info

v. Betsy Fidler, born 1882; died 1885.

More About Betsy Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska Research 04 Feb 2002

vi. Alexander Peter Fidler, born September 15, 1883 in Prince Albert, NWT = SK, CAN; died April 1966 in Edmonton, AB, CAN; married Harriette Howse in Hardisty, AB, CAN.

More About Alexander Peter Fidler:
Fact 1: Patrick Best <bestp44@hotmail.com> May 22, 2001
Fact 2: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Harriette Howse:
Burial: Rusylvia, AB, CAN
Fact 1: Patrick Best <bestp44@hotmail.com> May 22, 2001
Fact 2: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

22. Thomas Swain, born April 06, 1837; died April 29, 1940. He married 23. Ellen (Nellie) Bremner.

23. Ellen (Nellie) Bremner, born 1831; died September 04, 1928 in Langmende. She was the daughter of 46. Alexander (Sr) Bremner and 47. Elizabeth Twatt.

More About Thomas Swain:
Fact 1: T.C. McCloy papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

More About Ellen (Nellie) Bremner:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

Children of Thomas Swain and Ellen Bremner are:

i. Harriet Swain.

More About Harriet Swain:
Fact 1: from Paulette

ii. Sarah Elizabeth Swain, married Alexander Foulds July 28, 1887.

More About Sarah Elizabeth Swain:
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Research

More About Alexander Foulds:
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Research

11 iii. Margaret Swain, born July 15, 1860 in Headingly, MB, CAN; died August 18, 1943 in St Catherine's District, Lily Plain, SK, CAN; married Peter Charles Fidler July 07, 1875 in Holy Trinity, Headingly, MB, CAN.

iv. Mary Swain, born 1864 in Fort Garry, Manitoba, Canada; died in Green Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada; married Andrew James McKay.

More About Mary Swain:
Burial: Meadow Lake, Saskatchewan
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 778 as Swaine

More About Andrew James McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

v. John Andrew Swain, born 1868; died 1967; married Christina Inkster.

More About John Andrew Swain:
Fact 1: from Paulette

More About Christina Inkster:
Fact 1: from Paulette

vi. Lebina Agnes Keziah Swain, married Miles Alexander Foulds February 18, 1914.

More About Lebina Agnes Keziah Swain:
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Research

More About Miles Alexander Foulds:
Fact 1 1: Eileen Horan Research
Fact 1 2: from Paulette

Generation No. 6

32. William McKay, born March 27, 1795; died January 13, 1887 in St Andrew's, Manitoba, Canada. He was the son of 64. Donald 'Mad' McKay and 65. Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland. He married 33. Julie Chalifoux August 13, 1826 in Norway House.

33. Julie Chalifoux.

More About William McKay:
Fact 1 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 1 2: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: FMN ID 3669
Fact 3: MF pgs 729 & 768

More About Julie Chalifoux:
Fact 1 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 1 2: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

More About Charlotte Matheson:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999
Fact 3: MF page 729 & 768
Fact 4: Scottish

Children of William McKay and Julie Chalifoux are:

i. William McKay, born 1826; married Elizabeth Grant January 25, 1853 in St Francois Xavier, Manitoba, Canada.

Notes for William McKay:

From Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudsons Bay' December, 1998

Elizabeth is identified in FMN as 'Betsy.' Courtship in the early days was a formal affair and sometimes because of distances and isolation, difficult. The courtship of Elizabeth and William McKay, son of William McKay, master of a post on Trout Lake was no exception. Most often correspondence was the only means to formalize a relationship. In this case James Hargrave from York Factory wrote in January 1849 to his old friend Cuthbert Grant regarding the proposal of William.

Y.F. 17 Aug/49
C. Grant Esq/R.R.

My dear Grant;

I enclose a letter from Mr. W. McKay, one of my post servants the subject of which was made known to me this summer. His son and your daughter Elizabeth it seems had formed a reciprocal attachment to each other some time ago-and altho like others they kept to themselves= you now the young fellow has come forward in a manly frank manner and requests permission of me 'to take a wife'. He is a lad so far as I have known of a good character - is prudent and saving having wages as an asst. interpreter in the amount of Lew p.an. Should you approve of the proposal and that your daughter is still unengaged - I see myself no objection to his settling in life. And could your daughter come here next spring under the wing of a carefull and respectable freighter such as Mr. Mowat. I would take care of her in the Factory until her intended arrived from Grant Lake - when I would unite them as man and wife - agreeable to the rites of the Country & of England. With kind regards to my old friend Mrs. Grant, now & always

My dear Grant
most faithfully yours
J.H.

Cuthbert Grant's replay is dated in June, 1850

Grantown, 3rd June, 1850

J. Hargrave Esquire

My Dear Sir

Your kind favour of the 17th Augt came safe to hand on the arrival of the fall boats as well as an enclosed letter from Mr. W. McKay regarding his son William demanding my daughter Elizabeth for a wife. Now, after the character you give me of the young man's good behaviour ets. there lies no difficulty in complying to this request, but the devil is to get the girl to consent to go down alone and unprotected for she's not acquainted with any of the freighters, and her mother is also against it. But if the young man could be premitted to come and pass 2 or 3 days with us, no couble all these present difficulties would be done away with, so you see how the land lies. I shall not attempt to intrude on your present time and give you notheing but dismal news, so trusting this will find you enjoying your usual good health and spirits,

I am

Your ever faithful affate sert

Cuthbert Grant

Mrs. Grant begs to be kindly remembered to you. Elizabeth's reluctance was overcome at length, perhaps by a visit from the young man. Nevertheless the final arrangements took some time to complete, for the reply to a letter sent one year could not be expected until the next. It was 1853 therefore before the marriage took place and no doubt Grant gave his daughter a fine wedding.

From: 'Cuthbert Grant of Grantown' by Margaret Arnett MacLeod and W. D.

Morton, published by McClelland and Stewart Limited, Toronto, 1963, pages 139/140

More About William McKay:
Baptism: August 13, 1826, St John's, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: MF page 465 & 768
Fact 3: FMN # 3660

Notes for Elizabeth Grant:
Elisabeth is identified in FMN as "Betsy". She is identified in MF page 465 as Elizabeth. Elizabeth, her parents and husband are also identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1350 , Reel C- 4973, Access code: 90
File Title: Grant, Elizabeth; born: 1831 at St. Francois Xavier on Red River 2133; claim no. father: Cuthbert Grant (Métis); mother: Mary McGillis (Métis); married: 1853 at St. Francois Xavier to William McKay; children living: 5, see husband's application; children deceased: Cuthbert & one unnamed; scrip for $160.00 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

************

Courtship in the early days was a formal affair and sometimes because of distances and isolation, difficult. The courtship of Elisabeth and William McKay, son of William McKay, master of a post at Trout Lake was no exception. Most often correspondence was the only means to formalize a relationship. In this case James Hargrave from York Factory wrote, in January 1849, to his old friend Cuthbert Grant regarding the

proposal of William.

Y.F. 17 Aug/49

C. Grant Esq/R.R.

My Dear Grant-

I enclose a letter from Mr. W. McKay, one of my post servants the subject of which was made known to me the summer. His son and your Daughter Elisabeth it seems had formed a reciprocal attachment to each other some time ago - and altho like others they kept to themselves - yet now the young fellow has come forward in a manly frank manner and requests permission of me "to take a wife". He is a lad so far as I have known of a good character - is prudent and saving having wages as an asst. interpreter in the amount of L20 p. an. Should you approve of the proposal and that your daughter is still unengaged - I see myself no objection to his settling in life. And could your daughter come here next spring under the wing of a carefull and respectable freighter such as Mr. Mowat, I would take care of her in the Factory until her intended arrived from Grant Lake - when I would unite them as man and wife - agreeably to the rites of the Country & of England.

With kind regards to my old friend Mrs. Grant now & always.

My Dear Grant

most faithfully yours

J.H.

Cuthbert Grant's reply is dated in June 1850:

Grantown 3rd June, 1850

J. Hargrave Esquire

My Dear Sir

Your kind favour of the 17th Augt came safe to hand on the arrival of the fall boats as well as an enclosed letter from Mr. W. McKay regarding his Son William demanding my daughter Elisabeth for a wife. Now, after the character you give me of the young man's good behaviour etc. there lies no difficulty in complying to this request, but the devil  is to get the girl to consent to go down alone and unprotected for she's not acquainted with any of the freighters, and her mother is also against it. But if the young man could be permitted to come and pass 2 or 3 days with us, no doubt all these present difficulties would be done away with, so you see how the land lies.

I shall not attempt to intrude on your present time and give you nothing but dismal news, so trusting this will find you enjoying your usual good health and spirits

I am Your

ever faithful affate sert

Cuthbert Grant

Mrs. Grant begs to be kindly remembered to you.

Elizabeth's reluctance was overcome at length, perhaps by a visit from the young man. Nevertheless the final arrangements took some time to complete, for the reply to a letter sent one year could not be expected until the next. It was 1853 therefore before the marriage took place and no doubt Grant gave his daughter a fine wedding.

Quotes taken from pages 139/140 of "Cuthbert Grant of Grantown" by Margaret Arnett MacLeod and W.L. Morton published by McClelland and Stewart Limited Toronto 1963.

More About Elizabeth Grant:
Fact 1: from Stan-Grant file, Dec 1998
Fact 2: FMN as Betsy
Fact 3: MF page 465
Fact 4: see scrip info

16 ii. John Dougall McKay, born January 07, 1827 in Rainy Lake; died December 24, 1893 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada; married Harriet McKay April 24, 1856.

iii. Joseph McKay, born August 27, 1830 in Red River Settlement; died April 10, 1862 in St Andrews, Red River Settlement.

More About Joseph McKay:
Baptism: September 18, 1834, St John's, Red River Settlement
Burial: St Andrews, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: MF page 770

iv. Mary McKay, born Bef. December 10, 1834.

More About Mary McKay:
Baptism: December 10, 1834, St John's, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: MF page 770

v. Ann McKay, born May 16, 1837; died May 22, 1862.

More About Ann McKay:
Burial: St Andrews, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

34. John Richards McKay, born August 10, 1792 in Albany Factory, Northwest Territories; died December 09, 1877 in St. Clement's Manitoba, Canada. He was the son of 68. John R McKay and 69. Mary Favell. He married 35. Harriet Ballenden January 21, 1821 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land.

35. Harriet Ballenden, born Abt. 1795 in York Factory, Canada; died August 28, 1854 in Shoal River, Manitoba. She was the daughter of 70. John Ballenden and 71. Jane Cree.

Notes for John Richards McKay:
John R Mckay and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records. In this records his birthdate is shown as 1892, but this must be a typo, as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14931, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for McKay, John R.; born: August 10, 1892; father: John McKay (Scot); mother: Mary Favel (Métis); claim no: 2584; scrip no: 12161; date of issue: April 20, 1877; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

*************

From John Hunter (Jay)

"I can't find my copy right now, but I had the story on John Richards McKay, went to England to be educated. Came back to Brandon House and was with his mother and father when they both died in 1810. Was a very educated man. Started schools to teach dancing, fencing, math reading and all the graces.

His father-in-law John Ballendon also saw the need for schools. Their daughters were most precious to them. The sons were all sent to England to be educated, but what about the girls. John Ballendon started a school at York Factory. The school records are in the Canadian Archives and copies of these documents are in most Canadian University. Along with letters sent by John Ballendon. Thats how I knew how he spelled his name. Harriet is listed as one of the students. John Richards was the Chief Trader at Beaver Creek and Fort Elice, but he at times started various ventures, some that did not work out. But he did lead expeditions down the Missouri river in the early part of the 1800's

These documents are in the library both local and at the university, so I can copy them again, and then forward them. John Richards McKay along with all this family were very well respected."

**********

FROM STAN HULME "OUT FROM HUDSON'S BAY" Dec 1998

John and his wife Harriet are identified as Metis, his ID is FMN 3412. They were married about 1815 with a church wedding in 1821. John is also identified as being born in NWT which is British North America west of Lake Superior. He was educated in England and was buried in St Clements on December 11, 1877 (Metis Families pg 770). He was postmaster at Fort Ellice for a generation and was appointed by the Northern Department Council to the position of postmaster at the new post of Portage la Prairie in 1832. He was in charge of Fort Ellice in 1833.

John was known as Mac-quay-ah-ness (Little Bear Skin) to the Indians. His life is very much entwined with the Hudson's Bay Company since his father was Master at Brandon House until his death in 1810. It was during his time at Brandon House that he met Cuthbert Grant and the two became lifelong friends.

In fact John's sister Elizabeth (Bethsy) married Cuthbert Grant and John was remembered in Cuthbert's second will written after Bethsy's death or disappearance: "The said testator doth give and bequeath to his brother-in-law John Richards McKay now of Red River Clerk in the Honourable the Hudsons Bay Company's service, a like sum of Five hundredpounds Current Money aforesaid." (Cuthbert Grant of Grantown by Margaret Arnett MacLeod & W.L. Morton published by McClelland and Stewart Limited Toronto 1963 page81).

John is described as blond, well set up, good-looking, and a general favourite. It was said that he was more popular with his customers than with his company who considered him too liberal a trader. He was also noted for his expert swordsmanship. The art of fencing had evidently been included in John Richards' education, since some years later when he proposed to open an academy in Red River he listed fencing in his curriculum. (from the book Cuthbert Grant of Grantown).

John's biography is also included in the publication "Minutes of Council Northern Department of Rupert Land, 1821-31" published by the Champlain Society for The Hudson's Bay Record Society 1940, pages 446 and 447 as follows:

"John Richards McKay was the youngest son of John McKay who, after serving "Mr Shaw" at Lake St. Ann (Lake Nipigon), entered the service of the Hudson's Bay Company on May 7, 1791, when he described himself in his contract as formerly of the city of Montreal. In the autumn of 1800, John Richards McKay was sent from Albany Factory to London, presumably to be educated, and he returned to Hudson Bay in the summer of 1808, being described in the passenger list (C.I/770) of the Company's ship Prince of Wales as a writer, bound for Albany Factory.

He was stationed at Albany during 1808-09. During the season 1809-10 he joined his father, who was in charge at Brandon House, and served under him as a writer. John McKay, senior, died at Brandon House on July 5, 1810, and his son remained at the post until the end of the season 1810-11, when he went to Pembina River. He returned to the Brandon House area in 1812-13, and he was stationed at Riviere Qu'Appelle during 1814-15.

After the Company's men left Qu'Appelle with the trade returns in April, 1815, their post was burnt by the North West Company, and in the autumn of 1815 McKay was sent to rebuild the fort. He met with a great deal of opposition from the North West Company whilst engaged on this task, and the presence of a senior officer became necessary.

For the season 1816-17 he was listed as a writer and trader at Fort Hibernia in the Swan River district, and in the autumn of 1817 he built a post at Beaver Creek, about 15 miles below the old post at Qu'Appelle, and he apparently spent the winter of 1817-18 there. He was assistant trader at Beaver Creek during 1818-19, and was also stationed there during 1819-20. At the time of coalition McKay was in charge of Brandon House, where he apparently remained until he retired to Red River Settlement in 1824. Chief Factor John McDonald, in his Upper Red River district report 1822-23 (B.22/e/2), stated that McKay was "very active and much beloved by the Indians" of the district, but that he was an extravagant trader.

His name appeared in the Red river Census Papers dated June 1, 1829 (E.5/3), when he was described as a Protestant, aged 39, a native of Rupert's Land, married with four sons and two daughters. His age was given as 37 years in the Census Papers for the following year (E.5/4).

After an unsuccessful attempt to open an academy to teach, amongst other things, French, dancing and fencing, he joined the American traders in the autumn of 1830, and it was, no doubt, on this latter account, that he was given employment by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1831, when he was appointed to the Upper Red River district

In 1832 McKay was appointed post master in charge of the new post to be established at Portage la Prairie, and in subsequent years, until he was discharged in 1844, the Council appointed him to the management of Fort Ellice, in the neighbourhood of Beaver Creek. In 1845 he was described as a freeman in the Red River Settlement, and in 1846 he was again in the Company's service in charge of Partridge Crop in the Swan River district.

In 1847 he was in charge of Partridge Crop and Riviere Poule d'Eau, and from 1848-54 he was appointed to the charge of Shoal River post in the same district. In 1855 and 1856 McKay was appointed to the management of both Touchwood Hills post and Cree Camps in the Swan River district, in 1857 to the charge of Cree Camps, and in 1858 to the Touchwood Hills post again. He retired in 1859 and was later granted a pension.

According to the Earl of Southesk [Saskatchewan and the Rocky Mountains (Toronto 1875), p.50] he was assisting his son William, in the management of Fort Elice on June 25, 1859. He was apparently still living on August 5, 1876, when the Secretary of the Company addressed a letter to him at Fairford Mission, Manitoba.

The Red River Register (E.4/1) contains the record of his marriage on January 21, 1821, at Brandon House to Harriet, a daughter of John Ballenden (who was in the Company's service during the latter part of the eighteenth century), and also the records of the baptisms of their two eldest sons on the same day. In a will made in 1842 (A.36/Mc), he referred to his wife, six sons and five daughters."

More About John Richards McKay:
Burial: December 11, 1877, St Clements, MB, CAN
Fact 1: Sprague & Fife- 3412, Metis
Fact 2: see scrip info
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 778
Fact 4: John Hunter Research

More About LeReine? Trottier:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

Notes for Harriet Ballenden:
from Stan's Favell File Nov 1998

Harriet, Catherine Sinclair, John Bunn and his sister Mary were the first four pupils to start school at York Factory. The HBC had sent a Mr Geddes to the outpost to be schoolmaster and school opened for the first time on September 9, 1808. On September 30, Geddes took off on a hunting trip. leaving John and Mary's father, Thomas Bunn, in charge of the school. (Many Tender Ties, page 104, Four Recorders of Rupert's Land page 92)

In Many Tender Ties Harriet supposedly died in Edinburgh, Scotland, however in Metis Families page 770 she died in Shoal River, now Manitoba

More About Harriet Ballenden:
Fact 1: info from Nancy Lyn Tabor's FTM on-line Apr/98
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 770
Fact 4: Metis
Fact 5: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000
Fact 6: Eileen shows as b: 1799

Marriage Notes for John McKay and Harriet Ballenden:
Eileen Horan Research: "No. 9 Marriage Certificate of John Richards McKay (Courtesy: P.A.M., Winnipeg)

John Richards McKay of Brandon House and Harriet Ann Ballanden of the same place were married at Brandon House this Twenty-first Day of January in the Year One thousand eight hundred and Twenty One By me: John West, Chaplain.

This Marriage was solemnized between us:

( John Richards McKay (signature)

( Harriett Ballanden (signature)

In the Presence of ( James Inkster (signature)

( John Matheson (signature)"

More About Catherine (Smith) White:
Fact 1: from Stan's Favell database, Nov, 1998
Fact 2: Gail Morin Book pag 770 as Catherine Smith
Fact 3: also known as Catherine Smith

Child of John McKay and LeReine? Trottier is:

i. William McKay, born March 1823; died April 19, 1889 in Loon Creek Area, Saskatchewan, Canada; married Susan Versailles Bef. 1845.

More About William McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin Book pg 781
Fact 4: may have had children with Harriet and LaReine at the same time
Fact 5: Phyllis email Jan 6, 1999 shows LaRiene as mother of William
Fact 6: Source - Living descendant - Jana Curran <v.amyotte@sk.sympatico.ca> July 3, 2000

More About Susan Versailles:
Fact 1: info from Karma MacKay data email-Jan 1, 1998
Fact 2: source John Hunter
Fact 3: source - Living descendant - Jana Curran <v.amyotte@sk.sympatico.ca> July 3, 2000

Children of John McKay and Harriet Ballenden are:

i. John Sr. McKay, born November 15, 1816 in Red RiverColony; died Abt. 1922 in Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada; married Mary England in Green Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Notes for John Sr. McKay:

From Stan's Favell FTM File, Nov 1998

He worked for the HBC as an interpreter with the Indians. It is possible that the photograph taken in Sept or October 1858 and featured in the book 'Camera in the Interior; 1858', H. L. Hime, Photographer, The Assisniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition, The Couch House Press, Toronto, 1975, is this same John McKay

More About John Sr. McKay:
Baptism: January 21, 1821, at Brandon House
Fact 1: Sprague & Fife- 3382
Fact 2: Source T. C. McCloy
Fact 4: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 5: Gail Morin Book pg 770
Fact 6: worked for HBC as interpreter with the Indians

More About Mary England:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

ii. William McKay, born February 16, 1818 in Beaver Creek, Manitoba, Canada; died December 25, 1883 in Edmonton, Alberta; married Mary Cook November 05, 1846 in St John's Cathedral, Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada.

Notes for William McKay:
From Stan's Sinclair FTM, Nov, 1998

The following is taken from the autumn 1968 "The Beaver", article "Frontiersmen of Fort Ellice" pages 34 to 39. William was the Factor at Fort Ellice fro 1856 to 1872. 'The McKays were great traders and Chief Trader William McKay (son of John Richards McKay who took charge of Fort Ellice in 1833) was true to his prairie clan tradition. He was reputed never to forget a horse he had seen once and bargained eagerly for animals that took his fancy. The bargaining was especially keen when Americans were involved and on September 18, 1865 the factor's pen seemed to dance for joy as he wrote:

Made a bargain with an American who was passing, gave him 3 horses with harness and carts complete, for two fine yoke of oxen with yokes, chains and a large transport wagon. The oxen are splendid animals. The yoke are white, both alike. The others are red and also well matched."

William was Factor at Fort Pitt from 1872 until his death in 1883. (The Beaver Dec 1991/1992 "In the Midst of Life" pages 33 to 46.

********

Source: Fort Pelly Journal of Daily Occurrences, 1863 W.H. Long, Regina Archaeological Society, Regina, Saskatchewan Published March 1987, submitted by Eileen Horan

IV WILLIAM McKAY, Clerk in charge of Fort Ellice

William McKay was born at Fort Ellice in 1816, a son of John Richards McKay and Harriet Ann Ballenden. He entered the service of the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1837, advancing through the ranks to the position of Chief Trader at Fort Ellice. He was appointed in charge of the Swan River District, after the retirement of Chief Factor Robert Campbell, in 1870. His sons, John and Joseph McKay, also were prominent figures with the Company as interpreters, traders, etc. William McKay died Decemer 25th, 1883, at Edmonton (Fort Pitt) in the North West Territories (Alberta). He was buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Prince Albert, NorthWest Territories (Saskatchewan).

More About William McKay:
Burial: December 25, 1883, St Mary's Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin Book pg 772
Fact 4: Metis

Notes for Mary Cook:

Subject: Here We Go - Mrs McKay

Date: Thu, 08 Feb 2001 12:03:12 -0800

From: Doug Munro <kdmunro@home.com>

To: Willis Serena <serena@yt.sympatico.ca>

The story was originally published in the Saskatoon Star, May 12, 1917 - I obtained a cc from the Pat McCloy fonds at the Glenbow.

PASSING OF MRS. McKAY RECALLS DAYS OF BRAVE MEN AND FAIR WOMEN

Notable Woman Whose Husband Was Great Power in Early Days of Northwest -
A McKay's Word Was Always Trusted, Even by the Indians (by Z. M. H.)

When Mrs. McKay died in Prince Albert country a few days ago, it was like the sudden removal of a splendid and ancient landmark known and cherished by successive generations.

Her personal character; her adventurous life; her great age - almost a hundred years - the moving incidents connected with the most vital moments in the early history of the country in which she had participated and her position as senior member of one of the greatest families of native aristocrats, all contributed to make her a remarkable figure.

The McKays have been for generations commissioned officers in the Hudson's Bay Company, wielding on occasion almost despotic power over Territories larger than European kingdoms, and using, always, the influence placed in their hands with discretion and wisdom. It was a saying among the Indians of the plains that the speech of a McKay was straight and his word never broken. This splendid old lady belonged to a day and a family that regarded courage, honor and loyalty as cherished virtues, and practiced fidelity to the great company of adventurers like a religion. For pure and disinterested patriotic services rendered with intelligence and ability it is doubtful that any other family has the same claim over the gratitude of the people of this province. Their influence with the Indians, their reputation for personal courage and integrity is well know to have been one of the chief factors in keeping the settlement of the North West so remarkably free from the sanguinary troubles with the native population, which has almost invariably characterized similar epochs in similar countries. A Cree chief, or a Métis leader, might be inclined to doubt the good faith of a Prime Minister, or a governor-general, but everything would be alright if it was endorsed by a McKay.

It is now pretty generally acknowledged that had Major Crozier, in command of the Police, taken the advice tendered him by Thomas McKay just before the advance on Duck Lake, which ended so disastrously, the fight would likely have been averted, and the Riel rebellion of 1885 might never have reached its ultimate seriousness.

Mrs. McKay's husband, the late William McKay, was in the early sixties in command of the Hudson's Bay post at Fort Ellice, where the Qu'Appelle is merged in the Assiniboine, and afterwards at Fort Pelly, which was the headquarters of the district, which included within its boundaries the new post of Fort Qu'Appelle, and the more remote temporary trading places of Long Lake and Pile o' Bones. Some trading was also done at Wood Mountain, or "Montagne de Bois," as it was known to the hunters of the plains, but although the great company sent representatives there to deal with the Assiniboines, there does not appear to have been a permanent establishment at this point.

The first buildings erected for the company at Fort Qu'Appelle were built by the late Peter Hourie, who as chief interpreter for the Indian Department, was long a resident of Regina, and who died there within the last few years. Mr. Hourie also erected a trading post at the old crossing of the Wascana, on the land at present occupied by the farm of F. C. Tate, M. L. A. The Wascana Station was on the trail to and from the Buffalo grounds, and even today, where it has escaped the plow of the wheat farmer, the old wheel marks of the creaking Red River carts with their loads of buffalo hides and pemican, are to be clearly seen bitten deep into the sod of the prairie.

Afterwards Fort Qu'Appelle became a place of greater importance, as it was the nearest permanent post to the buffalo herds, which were moving their summer ranges a little further westward each year.

When the fort on the Fishing Lakes was established, there were a few scattered buffalo in the Qu'Appelle Valley westward from the present sight of Lumsden, and there was always a good bunch to be found in the Little Arm Valley, on the west side of Long Lake, but the big herds were out on the plains around Old Wives Lake. And it was there that the great summer hunt always took place.

With the growing importance of Fort Qu'Appelle, the late Archibald Macdonald was sent as clerk in charge, and under his energetic management a very large business developed. After Mr. McKay's incumbency Mr. Macdonald went to Fort Ellice, where he remained for many years, and where two of his sons still live, and are recognized as leading figures in the community. A third son is believed to be the first native born son of Saskatchewan to win in the present war the coveted Distinguished Service Order for gallantry in France.

During Mr. Macdonald's absence at Fort Ellice, W. J. McLean was in command at Fort Qu'Appelle. The town of McLean, between Balgonie and Qu'Appelle was named in his honor.

Mr. McLean was captured by Big Bear's Indians at Frog Lake at the time of the massacre there, and it was undoubtedly by his influence with the Indians that the lives of their prisoners were spared.

During the consulship of William McKay at Fort Ellice, a condition of harmony and peace was established with the roving tribes of Indians who inhabited the plains to the westward, and who for generations had lived as Bedouins by war and pillage. The wild and wandering Assiniboine, whose hand was against everyone, and who, in roving bands made the country around, and south from the present site of Regina a dangerous ground, came to see the advantage of being in the good graces of a masterful agent of the company: the Sioux of Minnesota were finding a lodgement in the country, and proving themselves good Indians; and the trade of the district assumed large dimensions with the Crees and Saulteaux of the Qu'Appelle valley, Touchwood Hills and File Hills.

McKay Appealed to Imagination

Mr. McKay had all the attributes which appealed to the imagination of the primitive and warlike native races over whom he maintained such a remarkable ascendancy. In person, he was strong, vigorous and handsome, his judgment was excellent, and his integrity became like a proverb. He excelled in all manly exercises. A splendid horseman, an adept with shot gun and rifle, and a snowshoe traveler of wonderful endurance, he possessed every qualification for his position.

Mrs. McKay was a fitting consort for such a man. Graceful, dignified and courteous, she has received many grateful tributes from travelers like Butler and Palliser, who enjoyed the courtesies of her hospitality. Like her husband, she keenly enjoyed hunting, and was an excellent shot.

On his return from a visit to the east, Mr. McKay brought as a gift to his wife a very fine fowling piece. It was one of the earliest breech loaders and a great curiosity on the plains in those days of powder horn and shot belt. How the possession of this gun saved her life when she was unconscious of any danger was related to her years afterwards by a missionary, to whom the story had been told by the two marauders who figured in it.

Fort Ellice was far away from the country of the dreaded Blackfeet, who as a rule maintained their habitat west of the Lake of the Old Women, as Johnstone Lake was then called by the folk of the plains, but occasionally small war parties made a foray into the country of their hereditary enemies the Crees in quest of scalps and horses. Two Blackfeet stragglers from such a party found themselves one morning in the vicinity of Fort Ellice. They were in hostile territory, so they hid

themselves in the bush by the banks of the river, waiting for darkness, when they could take their departure unseen and unmolested. All day they lay among the trees watching the goings and comings at the fort. Towards evening Mrs. McKay came walking alone down towards the river looking for mallards, on which to test her new gun. Said one Blackfoot to the other: "Here comes a woman. Let us kill her. Her scalp will be our trophy, and we shall not go back to our people empty handed" Arrow was laid to bow, and scalping knives loosened in sheath, while Mrs. McKay unconsciously walked toward her danger. When almost within striking distance she paused. A crow was wheeling over a bluff sixty yards away. Thinking this a good opportunity to try the range of the new gun, she fired at the

bird which fell. The noise of the shot startled a flock of mallards, which swung up from the creek, and passed overhead. Quickly throwing out the empty cartridge she reloaded , and with two quick shots brought down a pair of ducks to the astonishment of the watchers. After a whispered consultation they decided it would not be wise to meddle with a woman in possession of such a weapon.

"She will kill us both as she did the birds with the gun that makes such strange medicine," said they; so they remained hid in the bush, leaving Mrs. McKay to retrace her steps unaware of her peril Many years afterwards when breech loaders had ceased to be a mystery, and the Blackfeet no longer rode on war parties, one of the Indians related the incident to a missionary, and Mrs. McKay learned of the danger in which she had stood on that day on the banks of the Qu'Appelle.

William McKay died years ago, but Mrs. McKay has lived to attain a wonderful old age, keeping till the last her faculties of mind and body, and remaining the object of respect and veneration not only of her own family connection, but of the diminishing body of pioneers residing in Northern Saskatchewan, who were associated with the days of the dominance of the Great Company. She reared a splendid family of sons and daughters, and lived to see them step forward and take positions in the modern development of their native province, almost as prominent as those which their ancestors occupied under different conditions, and in previous generations.

One son, the Honorable Mr. Justice McKay, of Regina, is a native of the west, of whom Saskatchewan is justly proud. He practiced law in Prince Albert for years, and took an active part in politics before his elevation to the bench. In 1896 the feeling engendered by the Riel rebellion was still simmering in spots, and Sir Wilfrid Laurier, perhaps to justify his "Saskatchewan Musket" attitude, accepted the nomination for the old constituency of Saskatchewan, within the boundaries of which lay the scene of the unfortunate rising. The present Judge McKay was

nominated to oppose him, and it is a remarkable tribute to his personal qualities, and the reputation of his family, that the Liberal leader, with all his wonderful magnetism, and the prestige of a great party behind him, only defeated Mr. McKay by the narrowest margin.

Reads Like Cooper Romance

Another son is Mr. Thomas McKay, who farms extensively in the Prince Albert district. The story of his life would read like a romance of Ballantyne or Cooper. In the early 60's he held a commission in the service of the Hudson's Bay Company, and was associated with Fort Qu'Appelle, Fort Ellice and Fort Pelly. While still a young man he resigned from the company, and went to Prince Albert, where he commenced farming. During the first mutterings of the storm which culminated in the rebellion of 1885, Mr. McKay made repeated representations to the authorities of the seriousness of the situation, and did everything in his power to arrest the danger. Then when at last "the heather was afire," he shouldered his rifle, and acquitted himself valiantly. One of the first aggressive actions of Riel was the taking possession of Duck Lake and the pillage of the stores by his followers. Major Crozier, with a party of Mounted Police, reinforced by a body of Prince Albert volunteers, was at Carlton. Crozier wished to march on the rebels; Mr. McKay counseled opening negotiations, as the enemy were well organized, armed and in force, and besides, the country, covered with scrub, was better adapted for the Métis tactics than those of a regular force like the Mounted Police.

Feeling that little good could come from an attack under such conditions, Mr. McKay offered to go himself and represent to the rebels the seriousness of their action. He accordingly set out on horseback, travelling during the night, and was stopped by the Métis pickets just outside the village in the dawn of the morning. Gabriel Dumont, a man far more formidable than Riel, was in charge of the outpost. When the halfbreeds recognized Mr. McKay they greeted him with respect, and he at once began to advise them of the foolishness of their actions. They were listening to him and his words were apparently having effect, when Dumont rode up, and roughly demanded what Mr McKay wanted, at the same time placing his rifle against his body.

"I did not come to see you Gabriel," said Mr. McKay. "I have come to talk with my friends with whom I have hunted the buffalo on the plains, with whom I have traded, and whom I regard as brothers, and whom you are leading to their ruin. You ought to know better than to think to frighten me with your big talk."

Dumont threatened violence, but the old buffalo hunters of the plains refused to allow him to be harmed, and he was brought to the building occupied by Riel and his fantastic staff. Mr. McKay treated the leaders of the Métis with scorn, declaring that his mission was to the halfbreeds who were their dupes. Riel called a council of his advisers and they went into executive session in a room, that was only separated from the one in which Mr McKay was detained, by the thinnest of partitions, and he heard every word of discussion.

More About Mary Cook:
Baptism: April 19, 1825, at St John's, RRS
Christening: April 19, 1825, St John's, RRS as an adult
Fact 1: info from Karma MacKay data email-Jan 1, 1998
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research
Fact 3: see scrip info

iii. Mary McKay, born July 21, 1820 in Brandon House, Manitoba, Canada; died Bef. 1920; married John 2nd Wills September 06, 1842 in St. Francois Xavier, Manitoba, Canada.

More About Mary McKay:
Fact 1: info from Nancy Lyn Tabor's FTM on-line Apr/98
Fact 2: birth date from Paulette(Dec 21, 1820)
Fact 3: Gail Morin Book pg 775
Fact 4: death date -Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

More About John 2nd Wills:
Fact 1: info from Nancy Lyn Tabor's FTM on-line Apr/98
Fact 2: from Stan-Grant file, Dec 1998

iv. Charles McKay, born Abt. 1822; died Bef. 1822.

More About Charles McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 776
Fact 4: died as an infant, buried at Upper Church

v. Edward McKay, born May 11, 1824 in Brandon House, NWT = MB, CAN; died November 29, 1884 in Fort Walsh, near Medicine Hat, NWT = SK< CAN; married Caroline Cook 1845 in Mapleton, Manitoba.

More About Edward McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Sprague & Frye - father is #3412
Fact 4: buried in Fort Walsh, near Medicine Hat beside his daughter, Clara
Fact 5: Gail Morin's book page 776 shows birthplace as Brandon

Notes for Caroline Cook:
Caroline Cook, her husband and parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-b , Volume 1330 , Reel C-14940, Access code: 90
File Title: McKay, Caroline - Concerning her claim as a head of family - Address, Medicine Hat - Born, 1827 at Winnipeg - Father, Joseph Cook, (Métis) - Mother, Catherine Sinclair, (Métis) - Married, 1845 at Mapleton Parish, Manitoba to Edward McKay - Children living, eight (names on declaration) - Children deceased, four - Scrip for $160 -Claim 360 Finding Aid number: 15-20"

More About Caroline Cook:
Date born 2: 1827, Winnipeg, RRS
Baptism: July 09, 1826, St John's, RRS as an adult
Burial: at St Peters, Manitoba, Canada
Christening: June 01, 1904, St John's, RRS as an adult
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 776
Fact 3: see scrip info

vi. Alexander McKay, born February 16, 1826 in Northwest Territories; died December 17, 1878 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada; married Catherine McCorrister July 26, 1847 in St Andrews, Red River Settlement.

More About Alexander McKay:
Date born 2: February 16, 1826
Fact 1: from Stan's Favell database, Nov, 1998
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 778 & 1208
Fact 3: FMN ID 3401, father is 3412

More About Catherine McCorrister:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Furtrade Database-1999
Fact 3: MF page 778 & 1208
Fact 4: Sasha McCorrister email <macman@comnet.ca> May 2, 1999

vii. Eliza McKay, born October 05, 1828 in St Paul, Red River Settlement, Manitoba, Canada; died February 22, 1906 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada.

More About Eliza McKay:
Burial: St Mary's, Prince Alberts, Sask.
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 779
Fact 4: birth date in Gail's data is 1826
Fact 5: buried at St Mary's Prince Albert, Sask, Can

viii. John McNab Ballenden McKay, born June 07, 1831 in RRS; died May 06, 1907 in Wingard, SK, CAN; married Mary McCorrister June 10, 1857 in St Andrews, RRS.

Notes for John McNab Ballenden McKay:
John McNab Ballenden McKay, his parents, wife and children are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1358 , Reel C-14988, Access code: 90
File Title: McKay, John McNab Ballendine; address: Prince Albert; born: 5 Jan., 1831 at Fort Ellice; father: John Richard McKay (Métis); mother: Harriet Ballendine (Métis); married: 1848 at Winnipeg to Mary McCorrister; children living: Sarah, George Bruce, Archibald, Frederick John, Thomas & William Charles; children deceased: Herbert; scrip for $160.00; claim no. 957 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

************************

from Stan' Favell FTM Nov 1998

He was an interpreter and trader at Fort Qu'Appelle in 1867. Promoted to Post Master in 1869. Jerry is mentioned on many occasions in the book Company of Adventures by Issac Cowie published in 1913. One particularly good reference pages 216 - 220, in part is:

'Interpreter, John McNab Ballenden McKay was a younger son of the famous trader, John Richards Mckay, of Fort Ellice. His mother was a fine and fair daughter of Chief Factor Joh Ballenden, whose father and grandfather had been masters of Forsts Severn and York, on Hudson's Bay during the previous century.

Except in formal contract the Christian and hereditary names of our interpreters were never used, for he was known by all, including his very wide circle of Indian acquaintances by the name he had given himself as an infant 'Jerry'. He wore his hair long, accoring to the prevailing fashion of the place and time and kt, like his beard and moustache and complexion was fair, which, with his clear blue eyes, showed that if a celt in name, he was also of the Orkney blood of the Norsemen. He was under the middle sature, because his well-built body was on relatively shore lets, which, however, more than made up for that by all their marvellous activity. He could run foot and snowshoe races and with daytrains for days and nights in succession with the best in that land of runners.

From his father he had acquired all the athletic feats which had astonished the natives frequenting Fort Ellice of old, the art of dancing the sailor's hornpipe, the Highland fling and the Sword dance, also the equestrian skill to suddenly string from the stirrups to this feet on the saddle of any horse he happened to be riding and balance himself on one foot whether the animal were going at a trot or gallop. Then, resuming the saddle, he could pick up any small object on the ground as he passed it at a gallop, or initate the Indian warriors of the southern plains by throwing himself on one side of the pony and shooting at an imaginery enemy from under the animal's neck as he circled round at full speed."

More About John McNab Ballenden McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 779
Fact 3: called Jerry to distinguish him from older brother John
Fact 4: FMN ID 3650
Fact 5: see scrip info

Notes for Mary McCorrister:
Mary McCorrister, her husband and parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-b , Volume 1330 , Reel C-14940, Access code: 90
File Title: McKay, Mary - Concerning her claim as a head of family - Address,

Prince Albert - Born, Aug., 1837 at St. Andrews - Father, James McCorrister, (Métis) - Mother, Catherine Jones, (Métis) - Married, 10 June, 1857 at St. Andrews to John McNab B. McKay - Children living, six (names on declaration) - Children deceased, one, Herbert born June 20, 1866, died Aug., 1868 - Scrip for $160 - Claim 1342  Finding Aid number: 15-20 "

More About Mary McCorrister:
Baptism: October 18, 1836, at St John's, RRS
Burial: at St Cyprian's Wingard, Saskatchewan, Canada
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 779
Fact 3: see scrip info

ix. Letitia McKay, born March 12, 1833 in Fort Ellice, NWT; died December 22, 1920 in Kinesota, MB, CAN; married (1) Peter Anderson 1850 in Portage la Prairie, RRS, NWT; married (2) George Park Aft. 1850.

More About Letitia McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: FMN opposite her husband ID# 90, Metis, Protestant
Fact 3: MF pages 29, 780 & 932

Notes for Peter Anderson:
Peter Anderson is identified with his parents in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1319 , Reel C-14925, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Anderson, Peter; born: 1827; father: James Anderson (Scot); mother: Mary (Indian); claim no: 2278; scrip No:11144; date of issue: Oct. 2, 1876; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

*******

from "When the West was Bourne"

Peter Anderson, the 11th child and 5th son of James and Mary Anderson, became a servant of the Hudson's Bay company in 1845 and served as a 'Bowman' (lead paddler) for nine years in the Swan River District. He signed a new contract on June 1, 1854, this time as an Interpreter, still in the Swan River District.

From "book of the HBC Servants Records for the year 1854" we read: Peter Anderson Jun 1, 1954 RRS 25 (pounds) Interpreter. In addition to his wages, the gratuity of 2 bags of pemmican per annum to Peter Anderson is to be continued while he winters at Shoal Rivers. Term 3 years, Mr J Christie CT witnessed by Thos Taylo, LR"

From Dot Lewis

When Peter retired from the Company after eighteen years service he returned to the RRS, visited his family there and also attended to the baptism of his son Peter. He then joined his brother-in-law James Johnston, who was already living at the young White Mud River Settlement. Here his son John Richard was born in 1863. However they could not have been happy there as the family had moved into Portage la Prairie by 1866. After Peter died abt 1879, his widow Letitia moved with the children who were still at home, back up to Westbourne. They were involved with the settlement until 1911. During this time Letitia married George Park, who was the caretaker of the Westbourne Chapel and St George's Church for many years. The Parks lived in a home along the Carleton Trail on the PL 23.

[Brøderbund Family Archive #118, Ed. 1, Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s, Date of Import: Apr 5, 1998, Internal Ref. #1.118.1.1504.7]

Individual: Anderson, Peter
Event: Born
Year: 1827
Place: Red River Settlement
Province of record source: Manitoba
County of record source: Red River
Comments: Métis.
Source: The Genealogy of the First Metis Nation, The Development and Dispersal of the Red River Settlement 1820-1900.
Author: D.N. Sprague and R.P. Frye
Publisher: Pemmican Publications
Publication place: Winnipeg, MB
Publication year: 1988
Volume/Page(s): 41

Please note: The province and county are associated with the location of the record source and in some cases may not be the same as the place where the event occurred.

More About Peter Anderson:
Baptism: February 24, 1829, at St John's, RRS
Fact 1: County of record source: Red River (Source: Brøderbund Family Archive #118, Ed. 1, Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s, Date of Import: Apr 5, 1998, Internal Ref. #1.118.1.1504.7)
Fact 2: FMN ID# 90 as Metis & Protestant (Source: Brøderbund Family Archive #118, Ed. 1, Canadian Genealogy Index, 1600s - 1900s, Date of Import: Apr 5, 1998, Internal Ref. #1.118.1.1504.7)
Fact 3: MF page 26
Fact 4: Dot Lewis email Feb 20, 1999
Fact 5: Furtrade Database, Stan Feb 1999
Fact 6: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000 as Peter Charles Sr Anderson
Fact 7: see scrip info

More About George Park:
Baptism: December 26, 1826, At St John's, RRS
Fact 1: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 932 & 1088

17 x. Harriet McKay, born July 06, 1835 in Fort Ellice, Northwest Territories; died February 12, 1913 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada; married John Dougall McKay April 24, 1856.

xi. Caroline McKay, born August 25, 1838 in Fort Ellice, NWT; died February 12, 1913 in Fort Pelly, Swan River District, MB, CAN; married William Linklater May 04, 1858 in St Andrew's Church, Ft Pelly, SK, CAN.

Notes for Caroline McKay:
History of Fort Pelly, October 22nd 1863 to May 16th 1864

After the union of the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay company in 1821, many of the individual posts were abandoned. Some new ones were built. One of these new fur trading posts was Fort Pelly.

Fort Pelly I, 1824-1857

Fort Pelly, probably named for Sir John Pelly, Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, by the Overseas Governor (George Simpson), was built by Chief Trader , Allan McDonell. Fort Pelly was located on a site northeast of the elbow of the Assiniboine river, approximately 8 miles southwest of the present Village of Pelly, Saskatchewan. It was to be the headquarters of the newly-formed Swan River District. It consisted of a dwelling house, an Indian house, dwellings for the staff, stores and stable buildings, all enclosed within a palisade forming a square of one hundred and twenty feet. The fort was built to accommodate the trade of the Cree and Saulteaux Indians who inhabited the surrounding area. Its location served the transportation of goods either by the Assiniboine River or by a short portage to the Swan River, and thus to York Factory of Hudson Bay.

A fire destroyed the buildings of the fort during the winter of 1842-43. The post was immediately rebuilt by Chief Trader Cuthbert Cummings. The site of the fort was subject to occasional flooding by the Assiniboine River, and as a result it was moved a short distance to the east on higher ground in 1856-57.

Fort Pelly II, 1857-1912

This fort was built about one-quarter of a mile southeast of the first post by Chief Factor William J. Christie in 1856-1857. The fort was visited that year by Captain Palliser in late October, while construction was still in progress. He commented that it reminded him of a "commodious shooting lodge, similar to those at home in the highlands of Scotland". The old fort was still in use at this time, both as dwellings for the servants, and for stables. The Earl of Southesk stayed at the fort during the winter of 1859. A new, square, whitewashed cottage with small dormer windows had been constructed. There were various outhouses for stores. A stockade was not required, due to the fact that the Saulteaux Indians were so peaceable. In 1887, J.B. Tyrrel, reporting on the second Fort Pelly, as he saw it when on the Geological Survey wrote, "Fort Pelly is situated on rising ground on the east side of the river and it is a large well built fort protected by a high fence or wall of sawn planks. Over the heavy gate, in front is a stout bastion, from which a magnificient view can be had of the surrounding country".

In 1870, Hudson's Bay Company rule came to an end. The Company surrendered its chartered territories to the British Crown, and the Crown transferred the territories to Canada. The Company retained its posts and specific amounts of land in their vicinity. The last Chief Trader to command Swan River District from Fort Pelly was Archibald McDonald. Shortly after 1871, the district headquarters were moved to Fort Ellice. Fort Pelly became a fur trading post in the charge of Clerk Adam McBeath in 1874.

River navigation, by flat bottomed stern-wheel steamboats , commmenced in 1879 on the Assiniboine River and by 1881 had reached Fort Pelly.

The North West Rebellion of 1885, often referred to as the Second Riel Rebellion, created apprehension in most areas in the vicinity of the old trading posts. However, there was no bloodshed at Fort Pelly.

Ranching developed in the Pelly region before the turn of the century, and settlers began taking up homestead in the early 1900's. Fort Pelly served as a business and social centre for this growing community. The coming of the railway to the district to the North of Fort Pelly caused the ultimate closure of the post in June 1912.

Fort Pelly, during the period of the 1860's, was the headquarters of the Swan River District. All trade from surrounding posts was received and goods distributed. It was the manufacturing and construction centre for the district. The items required for the trade not imported were made here, such as: traps, rat spears, trade points, stoves, metal parts for boats, and nails used for construction of buildings. Dog sleds, carts, and toboggans (called "carioles") were also made at Fort Pelly. Each year, much time was spent on the construction of boats and barge-like "batteaux". These were used to transport the packs and other furs to eventually end up in either York Factory or east in Montreal for shipment to England. A large herd of horses was maintained at the post for use with the cart brigades. Cattle and oxen were raised for food and use as "draft animals". Gardens were planted and vegetables grown to augment the food supply at the post. Grain crops such as wheat and barley were cultivated. Items such as tea, sugar, and flour were imported; as were other trade goods, too numerous to mention here.

Documented Hudson's Bay Company Servants and Free Traders, 1863-1864

Jacob Beads, John Beads, Thomas Beads, Henry Bear, John Beardy, "Iron" Bird, Joseph Bourassa, John Baptiste Bourassa, John Brass, Thomas Brass aka "The Salt Maker", Angus Buchanan, Joseph Cadotte, Peter Cadotte, Luke Caldwell, Robert Campbell, Louison Comptois, Narsisse Cassette, Alexander Christie, William J> Christie, John Daniel, William Daniel, Xavier Denomie, Charles Favell, Richard Favell, Thomas Favell, William Favell, Joseph Finlayson, Oliver Flammond, Peter Fidler, Francois Fournier, Michael Fournier, Gideon Fraser, Pierre Gardupius, George Garrioch, Peter Gervais, Joseph Green, Peter Hourie, Francois Henderson, Samuel Henderson, John Isbister, Peter Isbister, James Johnston, William Johnston and his wife (Betsy Budd), Charles Keeschick, Edward Keeschick, Thomas Keeschick, Thomas Kennedy, William Lemay, Louis Leblanc, Peter Lapierre, Joseph Letendre, Pierre Letendre, William Linklater, Adam (McAdam) McBeath, Archibald McDonald, Francois Matoney, Malcolm McIver, Charles Richard McKay, William McKay, William Mowat, George Okeness, Joseph Parisien, John Pelly, William Phillips, George Pottinger, Charles Pratt, David Prince, Baptiste Patenaude, Pierre Richard and his wife (Isabelle Chartrand), George (Thomas) Sanderson and his wife (Sarah Gill), George Sanderson Junior, William Sanderson or Sandison, Jack Severight, John Simpson, Francois Storo, James G. Stewart, Pierre/Peter Sabiston, Andrew Strange and his wife (Ann Sinclair), Reverend William Stagg, Peter Spence, Thomas Taylor, George Thorne, and Francois Vandal.

Documented Indian Traders at Fort Pelly, 1863-64

Apatis, Clippy, Cowayowit, Kameshakatit, Kakenanepoit, Macheconcas, Nasawang, Necanecasewhihais, Onanapapewasin, William Pepone Cappo, Sasasqua, Sheshequa, Wamestokoose, Wapecakakie, and Weawasun.

Notable Persons Listed in the, 1863-1864, Fort Pelly Journal

I. ROBERT CAMPBELL, Chief Factor of Swan River District

Robert Campbell was born in Perthshire, Scotland. He came to the Selkirk Settlement to look after the sheep in 1830. He was part of a group that went to the United States in 1832 to purchase sheep, a number of which were obtained in Kentucky. He continued to be in charge of that operation until 1834, when he entered the fur trade. Robert Campbell was appointed a Postmaster at Fort Simpson, in the MacKenzie District, under Chief Trader MacPherson, in 1835. He was promoted to Clerk and placed in charge of a post at Dease Lake in 1837. Campbell explored on the Liard River, establishing posts at Frances Lake, Pelly Banks, and one at the junction of the Pelly and Lewes Rives with the Yukon River (named Fort Selkirk in 1848). In 1850, he descended the Pelly River from Fort Selkirk to Fort Yukon, discovering that the Porcupine River was a tributary of the Yukon. In 1852, he left the North and returned to Scotland for a short time. He returned to Norway House and was married there in 1859, to a woman from Scotland. In 1863, Campbell was transferred to the Swan River District as Chief Factor, based at Fort Pelly. His son, Glenlyon Campbell, was born at Fort Pelly in October of 1863. Campbell remained at Fort Pelly until 1870, when he retired from the service to land he had secured near Gilbert Plains, Manitoba. He died in 1894.

II. JAMES G. STEWART, Chief Trader in charge of Touchwood Hills Post

James Stewart was born and raised in Quebec. As a young man, he served in the Rebellion of 1837. He entered the fur trade served in the Arctic. He was second in command, under Chief Factor James Anderson, in the search for the explorer Sir John Franklin, while a Hudson's Bay Company servant in the Mackenzie District. He received the Queen Victoria Medal for Arctic Exploration for the period of 1818-1852. During the Red River trouble of 1869-70, Stewart was determined to defend Norway House. He raised a group of men, at Norway House, and set out to retake Fort Garry arriving tin time to accompany Colonel Wolseley. Stewart was in charge of Touchwood Hills Post for some time. Shortly after the 1869070 Rebellion, he retired to Red River and subsequently appointed Indian Agent at Edmonton (Fort Pitt). James G. Stewart died in September 1880.

III. JOSEPH FINLAYSON, Clerk in charge of Guard Post at Fort Pelly

Joseph Finlayson was a son of Chief Factor Nichol Finlayson. He joined the Hudson's Bay Company as an apprentice clerk and served in the MacKenzie river District. He rose through the various ranks to Chief Clerk. Finlayson was Clerk in charge of the Guard Post in 1863; and, later in 1867, he was in charge of the Touchwood Hills Post. Finlayson's daughter, Nancy Ann, married William Sandison/Sanderson during the Spring of 1864 at Touchwood Hills Post. It was reported that Joseph Finlayson was fluent in several Indian dialects, could speak and write French, and could converse in Gaelic. Joseph Finlayson died in 1901 at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

IV WILLIAM McKAY, Clerk in charge of Fort Ellice

William McKay was born at Fort Ellice in 1816, a son of John Richards McKay and Harriet Ann Ballenden. He entered the service of the Hudson's Bay Company in 1837, advancing through the ranks to the position of Chief Trader at Fort Ellice. He was appointed in charge of the Swan River District, after the retirement of Chief Factor Robert Campbell, in 1870. His sons, John and Joseph McKay, also were prominent figures with the Company as interpreters, traders, etc. William McKay died Decemer 25th, 1883, at Edmonton (Fort Pitt) in the North West Territories (Alberta). He was buried at St. Mary's Cemetery, Prince Albert, North West Territories (Saskatchewan).

V. ADAM (McaDAM) McBEATH, Clerk at Shoal River

Adam McBeath was born in Scotland. He came to the Red River Settlement, then entered the fur trade and was posted to the MacKenzie River District. McBeath serves as a postmaster for many years, in charge of Fort Norman. Following serving in the North, he was posted as Clerk in charge of the Shoal River Post. In 1871, McBeath was transferred to Fort Pelly and remained there until his retirement from the service in 1880.

VI. ARCHIBALD McDONALD, Apprentice Clerk at Qu'Appelle Post

Archibald McDonald was born in Scotland in 1836, and came to Canada in 1854. He entered the fur trade as an apprentice clerk. McDonald took charge of Qu'Appelle Post shortly after it was established in 1857. As it was an out-post of Fort Ellice, he was at that post as well. He was succeeded at Qu'Appelle Post by Peter Hourie. After Fort Qu'Appelle was established in the Lakes, by Peter Hourie, in 1864, McDonald took over the post as Clerk in Charge. McDonald was promoted to Chief Trader in charge of the Swan river District at Fort Ellice in 1872, and remained there until 1883. During this time, he was promoted to Chief Factor. In 1883, he transferred the headquarters of the Swan River District to Fort Qu'Appelle. During the Red River Rebellion of 1870, McDonald led a brigade of Red River Carts to St.Paul, Minnesota. He was accompanied by Mrs McDonald and their two sons. Also, on this journey were Mrs. Robert Campbell, her son (Glenlyon) and an infant daughter. Archibald McDonald retired from the service in 1911. He died in January, 1915, at Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan.

VI. PETER HOURIE, Clerk in charge of "Where the Bones Lie", a Winter Post

Peter Hourie was born around 1819. He entered the serrvice of the Hudson's Bay Company and served as interpreter and clerk. Hourie was at the Guard Post in 1853. He also spent time at Fort Pelly, and was at the wintering post in the Wascana Valley, "Where the Bones Lie" in 1863. In 1864, he took charge of the Qu'Appelle Out-Post, from Archibald Mcdonald. He moved that post to the Qu'Appelle Valley, establishing it at the present site of Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan. Hourie left the service of the Hudson's Bay Company to become a free trader around 1866. He served as an interpreter during the Riel Rebellion. In 1887, Hourie joined the Department of Indian Affairs and was located in Regina. Just before the turn of the centry, Hourie was asked to assist in repatriation of some of Indians who had fled to the United States after the North West Rebellion of 1885. Peter Hourie died in 1910.

VII WILLIAM DANIEL, District Guide and Interpreter at Fort Pelly

William Daniel was born at Moose Factory, Rupert's Land, of an Irish father and an Indian mother. Daniel, known as "Big William", was renowned for his strength and courage. He was guide for the brigade to York Factory in the spring of 1868. As interpreter, he was in charge of the Qu'Appelle Post after Cyr. Daniel also worked with Cyr under Archibald McDonald, Apprentice Clerk. He became a free trader in 1869.

VII. LUKE CALDWELL, Church of England Cathechist

In the winter of 1863-64, Caldwell went with the Reverend William Stagg to Fairford to study the Ministry. He returned to Fort Pelly in the spring of 1864. Caldwell was placed in charge of the Mission at Fort Pelly and remained there for some time. He taught the children of the Post on Sundays, after holding Divine Service which was conducted in both English and the Native language.

Taken From: Fort Pelly Journal of Daily Occurrences, 1863 W.H. Long, Regina Archaeological Society, Regina, Saskatchewan Published March 1987

********

Stan's Sanderson File, Nov 22, 2000

Caroline's date of birth in Metis Families pg 692 is given as August 25, 1838. I also have another date of death as 12 Feb 1913 which was taken from the web pages for Titameg's Children. This information will have to be confirmed. She is also identified on pages 428 and 780. She is buried at St Andrew's, Key Indian Reserve. She is further identified in the National Archives Scrip Records as follows:

"Reference: RG15, INTERIOR, Series D-II-8-b, Volume 1330, Reel C-14940, Access code: 90
File Title: McKay Caroline - Concerning her claim as a head of family - Address, Fort Pelly - Born, 25 Aug., 1838 at Fort Ellice - Father, John Richard McKay, (Scot) - Mother, Harriet Ballentine, (Métis) - Married, May, 1858 at Fort Pelly to William Linklatar - Children living, ten (names on declaration) - Scrip for $160 - Claim 1514 Finding Aid number: 15-20"

More About Caroline McKay:
Baptised: St Andrew, Key Indian Reserve
Burial: St Andrews, Key Indian Reserve
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: death date from Jay Hunter data email Jan 1998
Fact 3: August 25, 1838, given as birth date in Gail Morins book page 780
Fact 4: Judy Parisian <partisian@sk.sympatico.ca> Nov 22, 2000
Fact 5: Judy shows as b: Aug 25, 1838 & d: June 22, 1923 in Ft Pelly, SK

Notes for William Linklater:
Information about William and some of his desendants was contributed by Judy Parisian and sourced as follows:

Subject: Family Tree

Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 16:37:56 -0800

From: "Guy Parisian" <parisian@sk.sympatico.ca>

To: "Serena Willis" <serena@yt.sympatico.ca>

Serena,

Thank you so much for everything. You can send our branch of the family to anyone who might be interested. I have copies of Family Group Records that were given to me by my mother, according to the sources of information on them, they "were copies of a family tree compiled January 21, 1884 in possession of Adele Johnson. Family research was compiled by Mr. T.R. Pat McCloy of Calgary Alberta from the Manitoba Census for 1870 and received from the Hudson Bay Co. Archives, Winnipeg, Manitoba."

It is from these sheets that it's listed that Caroline McKay was born Sept 1, 1838 and "buried" June 22, 1923. It says she died at Pelly, Saskatchewan. Pelly is located about 4 hours to the east of us, so I think this spring I'm going to take a drive there, and check out the correct dates in the cemetery.

Thanks again for everything, and if I can be of any help to you for anything just let me know. Your 6th Cousin, Judy Parisian

*************

William is identified in FMN 2821 as metis, his father's ID is 2816. He is further identified in Metis Families pages 428 and on 692 as being born in Lockport and again on page 780. According to the Metis Families entry he is buried at St Andrew's, Key Indian Reserve, SL. (not sure what SL stands for, will have to confirm at a later date). (Stan's Sanderson File, Nov 22, 2000)

*************

William Linklater, his parents and wife are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records. In this reference his wife is shown as Elizabeth Saunders rather then Sanderson as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-b , Volume 1329 , Reel C-14940 , Access code: 90
File Title: Linklatara, William - Concerning his claim as a head of family - Address, Fort Pelly - Born, Oct. 10, 1832 at Winnipeg - Father, John Linklatara, (Métis) - Mother, Elizabeth Saunders, (Métis) - Married, May, 1858 at Fort Pelly to Caroline McKay - Children living, ten (names on declaration) - Scrip for $160 - Claim 1516 Finding Aid number: 15-20"

More About William Linklater:
Baptised: St Andrew, Key Indian Reserve
Burial: St Andrews, Key Indian Reserve SL
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 692 & 780
Fact 3: FMN ID 2821, his father 2816
Fact 4: see scrip info

xii. Charles McKay, born July 28, 1840 in Ft Ellice, Manitoba, Canada; died Abt. 1916; married Margaret Campbell September 27, 1860 in Manitoba House, Manitoba, Canada.

More About Charles McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Gail Morin's book page 780

More About Margaret Campbell:
Burial: at Amaranth, Manitoba, Canada
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin's book page 780

xiii. Joseph McKay, born August 07, 1842 in Fort Ellice, NWT = Mb, CAN; died in near Maple Creek, NWT = SK, CAN; married Flavie Marguerite Poitras January 27, 1864 in St Francois Xavier, RRS.

Notes for Joseph McKay:
Joseph McKay and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14931, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for McKay, Joseph; born: August 7, 1842; father: John R. McKay (Métis); mother: Harriet Ballantine (Métis); claim no: 1343; scrip no: 10287; date of issue: August 21, 1876; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Joseph McKay:
Burial: in NWM Police Cemetary near Maple Creek
Fact 1 1: Paulette email Jan 14, 1999
Fact 1 2: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin's book page 781
Fact 4: FMN ID 3404 Father ID 3412

Notes for Flavie Marguerite Poitras:
Flavie Poitras, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14931, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for McKay, Flavie; born: 1849; wife of Joseph McKay; father: Pierre Poitras (Métis); mother: Marie Bruyere (Métis); claim no: 1344; scrip no: 10288; date of issue: August 21, 1876; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Flavie Marguerite Poitras:
Baptism: May 21, 1848, St Francois Xavier, RRS
Fact 1 1: Paulette email Jan 14, 1999 as born 1850
Fact 1 2: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: name Flavie from John Hunter
Fact 3: from Stan Favell FTM Nov 1998, full name
Fact 4: Gail Morin's book page 781
Fact 5: Bonnie has as Marguerite Flavie
Fact 6: see scrip info

Children of John McKay and Catherine White are:

i. Jane Harriet McKay, born 1859; died Abt. March 01, 1861 in Headingly, Manitoba.

More About Jane Harriet McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 781
Fact 4: March 01, 1861, buried at Headingly, Manitoba

ii. Albert Edward McKay, born 1861; died October 02, 1912 in Yukon, Canada.

More About Albert Edward McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: died in a shooting accident in Yukon
Fact 3: from Stan's Favell FTM Nov 1998
Fact 4: Gail Morin MF pag 781

iii. Amelia McKay, born 1862; married George Taylor.

More About Amelia McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 781 as Emelie

More About George Taylor:
Fact 1: from Stan's Favell database, Nov, 1998

40. Charles Fidler, born October 10, 1798 in Cumberland House, Rupert's Land; died May 15, 1886 in St James, MB, CAN. He was the son of 80. Peter Fidler and 81. Mary (Cree Indian) Mackogonne. He married 41. Anne Saunders October 25, 1825 in St Johns, RRS.

41. Anne Saunders, born May 31, 1810 in NWT; died February 05, 1883 in St James, MB, CAN. She was the daughter of 82. John "Jack" (Sanderson) Saunders and 83. Isabel (Swampy Cree) Indian.

Notes for Charles Fidler:
Charles Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Charles; born: Nov., 1797; father: Peter Fidler (White); mother: Mary Fidler (Indian); claim no.: 1631; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

**********

Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen

Charles Fidler was baptized by Rev David Jones. He was married by banns by Rev David Jones. Witnesses were: William Garrioc & William Norn. He died age 87 years & 5 months and was buried by Rev Alfred E. Cowley. Charles Fidler worked for the Hudson's Bay Company from 1812 as a labourer in the Winnipeg district, from 1815 as a steersman at Brandon House an d in 1819, he took charge at Fort Dauphin during his father's illness that year. He was described as "sober, honest, industrious and a good cooper". He worked again for the Company from 1849 to 1853 as a middleman on the boats.

Charles Fidler lived on lot #58 (48 acres) in St. James in 1835. there were eight persons in the household and they had: 2 horses, 10 cattle, 1 farm implement and 1 cart. They had 8 acres under cultivation. He was recognized owner of Lot #58 in 1870 and received patent to that lot in 1882.

Charles Fidler, 74, and Anne Fidler, 63, are listed on the 1870 Manitoba census in St. James.

An obituary notice appearing in a news paper dated at Swan Lake, MN , 10 Apr 1931 (?) - unfortunately the paper is not identified - for Charles' daughter Emily (Fidler) Abbott, states that Charles Fidler had moved to Pilot Point, MB, with his wife and family. If true, he and Anne must have returned to St. James prior to 1882, as there is evidence that they were living on lot #58 , St. James, in that year.

***********

More About Charles Fidler:
Burial: May 19, 1886, St James Cemetery, Winnipeg, MB, CAN
Christening: October 18, 1824, RRS, NWT= MB, CAN
Fact 1: #1535 Sprague & Frye, Metis P
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 31, 359, 621, 690, 1086 and 1160
Fact 3: see scrip info
Fact 4: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Notes for Anne Saunders:
Ann Saunders, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Ann, wife of Charles Fidler; born: 1810; father: Jake Saunders (Métis); mother: Isabel (Swampy Cree Indian); claim no.: 1632; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Anne Saunders:
Baptism: October 25, 1825, St Johns, RRS
Burial: February 07, 1883, St James Cemetery, MB, CAN
Fact 1: Sprague & Frye - Metis, P (Saunders)
Fact 2: from Paulette, email Nov 1998
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 31, 359, 621, 690 and 1160.
Fact 4: see scrip info

Children of Charles Fidler and Anne Saunders are:

20 i. Peter P Fidler, born March 15, 1824 in St John's, RRS; died 1901 in SK, CAN; married (1) Jane Lambert February 17, 1860 in Trinity, Headingly, MB, CAN; married (2) Therese Elizabeth Swain Abt. 1872.

ii. Edward Fidler, born 1826 in St James, RRS; died 1910; married Nancy Anne Bremner 1853 in St John's, RRS.

Notes for Edward Fidler:
Edward Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Edward; born: 1826; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim no.: 1572; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Edward Fidler:
Baptised: January 15, 1826, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: FMN #1538 as Metis, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 143, 360, 362, 533, 1103 and 1070
Fact 3: see scrip info

More About Nancy Anne Bremner:
Baptised: August 11, 1832, St Boniface, RRS
Burial: January 20, 1881, St Catherine's, Prince Albert, SK, CAN
Fact 1: FMN as Metis, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 143 (as Nancy Ann), 360 (as Ann) and 362, 533, 1103 and 1070 (as Nancy)

iii. Thomas Fidler, born August 30, 1827 in St James, RRS; died Unknown; married Margaret Lambert December 31, 1855 in St James, RRS.

Notes for Thomas Fidler:
Thomas Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records. In this reference his mother is shown as Ann Sinclair rather than Ann Saunders as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Thomas; born: August 30, 1827; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Sinclair (Métis); claim no: 1574; date of issue: September 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Thomas Fidler:
Baptised: August 24, 1830, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 361, 591 and 621
Fact 2: see scrip info

Notes for Margaret Lambert:
Margaret Lambert, her parents, husband anc children are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows; "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Margaret, wife of Thomas Fidler; born: 1846; father: Etienne Lambert (French); mother: Catherine (Métis); claim no.: 1575; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"  "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Margaret (nee Lambert), wife of Thomas Fidler; concerning the claims of her children: Thomas Fidler; born: 22 July 1860; Margaret Fidler, born: 12 September 1862; Mary Fidler, born: 7 December 1866; Catherine Fidler, bo rn: 28 November 1868 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Margaret Lambert:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 362, 591 and 621
Fact 2: see scrip info

iv. Elizabeth Fidler, born Bef. December 19, 1827 in RRS; died Unknown; married Louis Leblanc January 22, 1847 in St Andrews, MB, CAN.

More About Elizabeth Fidler:
Baptised: December 19, 1827, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

More About Louis Leblanc:
Burial: December 1856, St Andrew's, MB, CAN

v. Nancy Fidler, born October 06, 1828; died Unknown; married John Chamberlain.

Notes for Nancy Fidler:
Nancy Filder, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1319 , Reel C-14926 , Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Chamberlain, Nancy; wife of John Chamberlain; born: Oct. 6, 1828; father: Charles Fedler (Métis); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim Nc.: 875; scrip no.: 6609 and 6616; date of issue: July 12, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Nancy Fidler:
Baptised: December 19, 1827, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hume Research, MF page 361
Fact 2: see scrip info

More About John Chamberlain:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 361

vi. Charles Fidler, born Bef. May 20, 1832 in RRS; married (1) Flora Bremner; married (2) Charlotte Atkinson 1853 in Fort ala Corne, SK Terr.

Notes for Charles Fidler:
Charles Fidler, his parents, wife and children are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1346 , Reel C-14968,  Access code: 90
File Title: Fidler, Charles; address: Fort A la Corne via Prince Albert; claim no. 1040; born: 1830 at Red River; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Anne Sanderson (Métis); married: 1853 to Charlotte Atkinson at Fort A la Corne; children living Flora, Alexander, Charles & Elizabeth; scrip for $160.00  Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About Charles Fidler:
Baptised: May 20, 1832, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 31 and 362
Fact 2: see scrip info, in this reference his mother is shown an Anne Sanderson, however on some of her children's scrip records she is shown as Ann Saunders.

More About Flora Bremner:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF page 362

Notes for Charlotte Atkinson:
Charlotte Atkinson, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15, Interior , Series D-II-8-c , Volume 1334 , Reel C-14946, Access code: 90
File Title: Atkinson, Charlotte; address: Fort a la Corne; claim no. 1041; born: 1811 at Red River; father: George Atkinson (Métis); mother: Marguerite (Métis); married: 1853 to Charles Fidler at Fort a la Corne; children living: 4 (names on husband's application); scrip for $160.00 Finding Aid number: 15-21"

More About Charlotte Atkinson:
Fact 1: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 31 and 362
Fact 2: see scrip info

vii. Letitia (Lettie) Fidler, born 1834; died July 21, 1921 in Bresaylor, SK, CAN; married James Bremner February 27, 1857 in St James, RRS.

Notes for Letitia (Lettie) Fidler:
Letitia Fidler, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1319 , Reel C-14926, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Bremner, Laetitia; wife of James Bremner; born: 1835; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim no: 1559; scrip No: 10470; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Letitia (Lettie) Fidler:
Baptised: March 02, 1834, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999
Fact 2: Bresaylor Between pg 493
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 143 and 362
Fact 4: see scrip info

More About James Bremner:
Baptised: April 14, 1833, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 143 and 362.

viii. Alexander Fidler, born September 11, 1835 in St Andrew's, RRS; died Unknown; married Mary Ann Linklater.

Notes for Alexander Fidler:
Alexander Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Alexander; born: 11 September 1835; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim no.: 1628; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Alexander Fidler:
Baptised: November 22, 1835, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 362 and 690
Fact 2: see scrip info

More About Mary Ann Linklater:
Baptised: August 06, 1844, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pags 362 & 690

ix. Sophie Fidler, born April 27, 1837 in St Andrews, RRS; died March 03, 1913; married Joseph (Joe) Lambert December 24, 1858 in St James, RRS.

Notes for Sophie Fidler:
Sophie Fidler, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14929, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Lambert, Sophia; born: 1837; wife of Joseph Lambert; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Fidler (Métis); claim no: 1580; scrip no: 10490; date of issue: September 20, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Sophie Fidler:
Baptised: May 21, 1837, St Johns, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999
Fact 2: MF pgs 361, 362, 552 and 621, from Stan's Sanderson file
Fact 3: see scrip info

More About Joseph (Joe) Lambert:
Burial: Bresaylor Cemetary
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 361, 362, 552 and 621.

x. Amelia Amy Fidler, born Abt. 1839; died June 29, 1900 in Pilot Mound; married John McKenzie Simpson August 29, 1859 in St James, RRS.

Notes for Amelia Amy Fidler:
Amelia Fidler, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1324 , Reel C-14933, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Simpson, Amélia; born: 1839; husband: John Simpson; father: Charles Fidler (Halbreed); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim no: 1589; scrip no: 10498; date of issue: September 20, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Amelia Amy Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 362 and 1086
Fact 2: see scrip info

More About John McKenzie Simpson:
Baptised: December 26, 1830, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 362 and 1086

xi. Andrew Fidler, born Bef. February 14, 1839 in RRS.

More About Andrew Fidler:
Baptised: February 14, 1839, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 362

xii. Catherine Fidler, born August 18, 1840 in St James, RRS; married G H Smith.

Notes for Catherine Fidler:
Catherine is identified in MF page 362. The reference gives her DOB as 18 Aug 1848 but, according to the ref, she was baptized on 20 Sep 1840 at St Johns. Therefore, either her DOB or date of baptism is incorrect. I have changed her DOB to 18 Aug 1840. The information will have to be confirmed. She is also identified with her parents and husband in the National Archives Scrip Records as follows: "Reference: RG15, INTERIOR, Series D-II-8-a, Volume 1324, Reel C-14933, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Smith, Catherine (nee Fidler); wife of G.H. Smith; born: 18 August 1840; father: Charles Fidler; mother: Annie Saunders Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Catherine Fidler:
Fact 1: see scrip info
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research

Notes for G H Smith:
This is possibly George Henry Smith b. 18 Dec 1852 but confirmation will be needed before a connection is made.

More About G H Smith:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

xiii. David Fidler, born October 06, 1842 in St James, RRS; died Unknown; married Elizabeth McCorrister August 26, 1870 in St James, RRS.

Notes for David Fidler:
David Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927. Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, David; born: 6 October 1842; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Fidler (Indian); claim no.:1633; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About David Fidler:
Fact 1: #1537 Sprague & Frye - Met, P
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 363 and 741
Fact 3: see scrip info

More About Elizabeth McCorrister:
Baptised: November 03, 1849, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Sprague & Frye as Metis, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 363 and 741

xiv. Emelie Fidler, born March 07, 1846 in St James, RRS; married William Abbott July 20, 1972.

Notes for Emelie Fidler:
Emelie Fidler and her parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1319 , Reel C-14925,. Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Abbott, Emily (nee Fidler); born: 7 March, 1846; father: Charles Fiddler (English); mother: Ann Saunders Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Emelie Fidler:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 363
Fact 2: see scrip info

More About William Abbott:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 363

42. Etienne Lambert, born Bef. April 01, 1785 in St Michel, Yamaska, PQ. He was the son of 84. Jacques Lambert and 85. Marie Louis Danis. He married 43. Catherine Gaddy May 10, 1832 in St Boniface, Red River Settlement.

43. Catherine Gaddy, born October 31, 1799. She was the daughter of 86. James Gaddy and 87. Mary Muddy River Piegan.

More About Etienne Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Betsy Honore dit Henry:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Catherine Gaddy:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

Child of Etienne Lambert and Betsy Henry is:

i. Marie Madeleine Lambert, born October 01, 1821; married Augustine Ladouceur.

Notes for Marie Madeleine Lambert:
Marie Madeleine Lambert, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14929, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Ladouceur, Madeleine; born: October 1, 1821; wife of Augustin Ladouceur; father: Etienne Lambert (French Cdn.); mother: Betsy Honore, alias Henry (Métis); claim no: 1836; scrip no: 10733; date of issue: September 20, 1876; amou nt: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Marie Madeleine Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621
Fact 2: see scrip info

Notes for Augustine Ladouceur:
Augustine Ladouceur and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14929, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Ladouceur, Augustin; born: November 1, 1817; father: Joseph Ladouceur (French Cdn.); mother: Josephte Lapierre (Métis); claim no: 20, 1876; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Augustine Ladouceur:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621
Fact 2: see scrip info

Children of Etienne Lambert and Catherine Gaddy are:

21 i. Jane Lambert, born Abt. 1832; died June 1870; married Peter P Fidler February 17, 1860 in Trinity, Headingly, MB, CAN.

ii. Etienne Lambert, born Bef. March 05, 1833 in St Boniface, Red River Settlement.

More About Etienne Lambert:
Baptised: March 05, 1833

iii. Joseph (Joe) Lambert, born August 16, 1834 in Montreal, PQ; died February 07, 1920 in SK, CAN; married Sophie Fidler December 24, 1858 in St James, RRS.

More About Joseph (Joe) Lambert:
Burial: Bresaylor Cemetary
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 361, 362, 552 and 621.

Notes for Sophie Fidler:
Sophie Fidler, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1322 , Reel C-14929, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Lambert, Sophia; born: 1837; wife of Joseph Lambert; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Fidler (Métis); claim no: 1580; scrip no: 10490; date of issue: September 20, 1876; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Sophie Fidler:
Baptised: May 21, 1837, St Johns, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999
Fact 2: MF pgs 361, 362, 552 and 621, from Stan's Sanderson file
Fact 3: see scrip info

iv. Margaret Lambert, born Bet. 1825 - 1835; married Thomas Fidler December 31, 1855 in St James, RRS.

Notes for Margaret Lambert:
Margaret Lambert, her parents, husband anc children are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows; "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Margaret, wife of Thomas Fidler; born: 1846; father: Etienne Lambert (French); mother: Catherine (Métis); claim no.: 1575; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19" "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Margaret (nee Lambert), wife of Thomas Fidler; concerning the claims of her children: Thomas Fidler; born: 22 July 1860; Margaret Fidler, born: 12 September 1862; Mary Fidler, born: 7 December 1866; Catherine Fidler, bo rn: 28 November 1868 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Margaret Lambert:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 362, 591 and 621
Fact 2: see scrip info

Notes for Thomas Fidler:
Thomas Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records. In this reference his mother is shown as Ann Sinclair rather than Ann Saunders as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Thomas; born: August 30, 1827; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Sinclair (Métis); claim no: 1574; date of issue: September 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Thomas Fidler:
Baptised: August 24, 1830, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 361, 591 and 621
Fact 2: see scrip info

v. Sophie Lambert, born 1837.

More About Sophie Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

vi. Catherine Lambert, born Abt. 1841; died November 09, 1877 in St Eustache, MB, CAN; married William Monteuille.

More About Catherine Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About William Monteuille:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

46. Alexander (Sr) Bremner, born 1791 in Caithness, Scotland; died August 28, 1842 in St Johns, Manitoba. He was the son of 92. James Bremner and 93. Katherine Ogg. He married 47. Elizabeth Twatt May 01, 1833 in St John's, Red River Settlement.

47. Elizabeth Twatt, born Abt. 1790 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada; died May 13, 1885 in Bresaylor, NWT=Sk, Canada. She was the daughter of 94. Magnus Twatt and 95. Margaret.

Notes for Alexander (Sr) Bremner:
Joyce Debolt, Hudson's Hope, British Columbia, Canada, writes, on 8 July 1997 and 20 April 1998;

'My great grandfather Alexander BREMNER or BREHNER was born in 1791 in Orkney, then moved to Canada. Hehad eleven children, born in either Scotland or Canada: William 1812 (my great-grandfather), John 1815, Sara 1822, Betsy 1823, Thomas 1825, Charles 1829, James 1830, Ellen 1831, Nancy Anne 1832, Alexander Jr. 1836, Mary 1838. William BREMNER married first Mary LARIE, who died shortly after my grandmother was born. He married two more times, the second wife I believe was Mary HOGUE, and the third being Elizabeth TWATT, whom he married in 1833, she born 1790 in Orkney. He entered Hudson's Bay Company service in 1812 and travelled on the King George from Stromness to York Factory. Work for the HBC from 1812 to 1832, after which he left and settled at Red River on White Horse Plains and died 31 Aug 1842.'

More About Alexander (Sr) Bremner:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

More About Elizabeth Twatt:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

Children of Alexander Bremner and Elizabeth Twatt are:

i. John Bremner, born 1815; died 1870.

More About John Bremner:
Fact 1: Paulette email Jan 16, 1999

ii. Sarah Bremner, born 1818 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada; married Peter Brown.

Notes for Sarah Bremner:
Sarah Bremner, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1319 , Reel C-14926, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Brown, Sarah; widow of Peter Brown; born: 1818; father: Alexander Bremner (White); mother: Elizabeth Bremner (Métis); claim no: 1608; date of issue: September 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Sarah Bremner:
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: see scrip info

More About Peter Brown:
Fact 1: Furtrade database-Stan-Mar 1999

iii. William Bremner, born April 14, 1824; died 1887; married (1) Mary Hogue; married (2) Marguerite Allard; married (3) Marie Gariepy February 19, 1844.

More About William Bremner:
Fact 1: #479 Sprague & Frye
Fact 2: Paulette email Jan 16, 1999
Fact 3: Bonnie's Database, Feb 1999 for birthdate

More About Mary Hogue:
Fact 1: from Paulette

More About Marguerite Allard:
Fact 1: Paulette email May 18, 1999

More About Marie Gariepy:
Fact 1: Paulette email Jan 16, 1999

iv. Thomas Bremner, born 1825 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada; died February 01, 1853; married Louisa Sutherland September 02, 1847.

More About Thomas Bremner:
Fact 1: Paulette email Jan 16, 1999

More About Louisa Sutherland:
Fact 1: Paulette email Jan 16, 1999

v. Elizabeth (Betsy) Bremner, born 1827 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada; died 1881; married Dennis Caplette.

More About Elizabeth (Betsy) Bremner:
Fact 1: from Paulette, Metis RC

More About Dennis Caplette:
Fact 1: from Paulette, Metis, RC

vi. James Bremner, born Abt. 1830 in Headingly, NWT = MB, CAN; died July 30, 1910 in Bresaylor, NWT=Sk, Canada; married Letitia (Lettie) Fidler February 27, 1857 in St James, RRS.

More About James Bremner:
Baptised: April 14, 1833, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 143 and 362.

Notes for Letitia (Lettie) Fidler:
Letitia Fidler, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1319 , Reel C-14926, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Bremner, Laetitia; wife of James Bremner; born: 1835; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim no: 1559; scrip No: 10470; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Letitia (Lettie) Fidler:
Baptised: March 02, 1834, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999
Fact 2: Bresaylor Between pg 493
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 143 and 362
Fact 4: see scrip info

23 vii. Ellen (Nellie) Bremner, born 1831; died September 04, 1928 in Langmende; married Thomas Swain.

viii. Nancy Anne Bremner, born July 29, 1832 in RRS; died January 1881; married Edward Fidler 1853 in St John's, RRS.

More About Nancy Anne Bremner:
Baptised: August 11, 1832, St Boniface, RRS
Burial: January 20, 1881, St Catherine's, Prince Albert, SK, CAN
Fact 1: FMN as Metis, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 143 (as Nancy Ann), 360 (as Ann) and 362, 533, 1103 and 1070 (as Nancy)

Notes for Edward Fidler:
Edward Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Edward; born: 1826; father: Charles Fidler (Métis); mother: Ann Saunders (Métis); claim no.: 1572; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Edward Fidler:
Baptised: January 15, 1826, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: FMN #1538 as Metis, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pgs 143, 360, 362, 533, 1103 and 1070
Fact 3: see scrip info

ix. Charles Bremner, born 1835 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada; died May 16, 1919 in Bon Accord, Alberta, Canada; married Emily Wills August 28, 1860 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada.

More About Charles Bremner:
Fact 1: Source Paulette
Fact 2: 1900, Granted land in Sturgeon River-Battenburg (Gibbons, AB)
Fact 3: MF page 143 with birth date of 1840

More About Emily Wills:
Baptism: April 21, 1844, St Francois Xavier, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan-Grant file, Dec 1998, Battenburg, Alta, as death place
Fact 3: MF page 143 with birth of abt Dec 1843

x. Alexander(Jr) Bremner, born January 29, 1837 in Headingly, NWT = MB, CAN; died February 10, 1888; married Victoria Fidler December 16, 1863 in St James, RRS.

More About Alexander(Jr) Bremner:
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Furtrade database - Stan - Mar 5, 1999
Fact 3: MF pg 144

More About Victoria Fidler:
Baptised: September 06, 1840, St Johns, RRS
Burial: Headingly, MB, CAN
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 145.

xi. Mary Bremner, born 1838 in Headingly, NWT = MB, CAN; died June 13, 1881 in Headingly, NWT = MB, CAN; married Henry (Harry/Fleury) Sayer December 31, 1861 in Headingly, NWT = MB, CAN.

More About Mary Bremner:
Baptism: August 23, 1841, St Johns, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Mf pg 1069

More About Henry (Harry/Fleury) Sayer:
Baptism: February 21, 1841, St Francois Xavier, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: from Paulette
Fact 2: Mf pg 1069

Generation No. 7

64. Donald 'Mad' McKay, born Abt. 1753 in Clyne, Sutherlandshire Parish, Scotland; died June 26, 1833. He was the son of 128. Donald William McKay. He married 65. Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland Abt. 1809 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT.

65. Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland, died in Nova Scotia, CAN. She was the daughter of 130. James Sutherland and 131. Mary McKenzie.

Notes for Donald 'Mad' McKay:

>From Stan Hulme - Out from the Bay, 1998

'The 1963 edition of the MacMillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography, page 461, provides the following:

"fur trader, was a brother of Alexander and William McKay. He entered the service of North West Company and was on the Saskatchewan in 1786, when he passed cumberland House. He entered the service of the Hudson's Bay Company in 1790. He was stationed at Osnaburgy House in 1792, and on the Red River in 1794. In 1799 he left York Factory for England, on board the King George and he died according to a record in the possession of the McKay Family, in 1810." This in an error, it was John McKay, another brother that died in 1810. Donald apparently died in 1833. Donald was known as "Mad" McKay because of his explosive temper. He was apparently instrumental in the building of Brandon House. He was 80 years old when he died and is buried at Kenzieville Cemetery at Barney's River, Nova Scotia.'

More About Donald 'Mad' McKay:
Date born 2: 1753
Died 2: 1833, Nova Scotia, CAN
Fact 1 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 1 2: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000
Fact 2: MF page 768
Fact 3: June/July edition of Beaver, pgs 25 - 42
Fact 4: Dictionary of Canadian Biography Volume V page 534
Fact 5: 1779, hired as clerk for John Ross, a minor N.W.Co trader
Fact 6: see notes

More About Elspeth Kennedy:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

More About Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland:
Died 2: April 1797
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000
Fact 3: Eileen provided names for Miss Sutherland

Children of Donald McKay and Margaret Sutherland are:

i. Donald McKay, born Bet. 1792 - 1797; died 1838 in Canada; married (1) Christy Sutherland; married (2) Roberta McKay August 31, 1815 in York Factory, Rupert's Land.

More About Donald McKay:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: 1806, joined HBC as a clerk
Fact 3: 1836, retired from service

More About Christy Sutherland:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'

More About Roberta McKay:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'

32 ii. William McKay, born March 27, 1795; died January 13, 1887 in St Andrew's, Manitoba, Canada; married (1) Julie Chalifoux August 13, 1826 in Norway House; married (2) Charlotte Matheson July 15, 1863.

68. John R McKay, born 1753 in Clyne, Sutherlandshire, Scotland; died July 05, 1810 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land. He was the son of 136. John McNab McKay and 137. Unknown. He married 69. Mary Favell Abt. 1791 in Manitoba, Canada.

69. Mary Favell, born Abt. 1775 in Henley House, Rupert's Land; died March 19, 1810 in Brandon House, NWT. She was the daughter of 138. John Humphrey (Jr) Favell and 139. Titameg.

Notes for John R McKay:

>From John Hunter-Favel File

HUDSON BAY COMPANY RECORD
NAME: MCKAY, John PARISH: Clyne, Sutherlandshire ENTERED
SERVICE: 11 October 1790 DATES: b. ca.1753 (A.32/4,p.84) d. 5 July 1810

Appointments & Service
Outfit Year* Position Post District HBCA Reference
*An Outfit year ran from 1 June to 31 May
1790 - 1793 Master St. Annes Albany A.16/6,p.16
1793 - 1797 Master Lac La Pluie Albany A.16/6,pp.16,91
1797 - 1798 Master Brandon House A.16/6,p.91
1798 - 1800 Master Osnaburgh A.16/6,pp.91,142
1800 - 1810 Master Brandon House

A.16/6,p.142;A.16/7,pp.20,100

1810, 5 July died

REFERENCES:
Cameron, W.B., 1944, Clan McKay in the West, The Beaver, September, 275(2):3-7.
Search Files: John McKay (d. 1810); Donald McKay (Mad McKay); Manitou Rapids, Rainy River

NOTES:
Biography may be subject to revision as information becomes available.
John McKay is believed to be brother of Mad Donald McKay (SF: Donald McKay).

Previously employed by A. Shaw, Montreal trader, at Lake St. Anne (Nipigon); applied to join HBC, 1789-90 (B.3/b/28, fo. 10; B.59/b/9, fo. 4d, 6d). John McKay was master of Manitou Rapids, Lac La Pluie, 1793-1795, and of Asp House, Lac La Pluie, 1795-1797. Wife: Mary Favell, dr. John Favell Jr. & Titameg), m. ca. 1791; Children: 5 sons, 3 daughters (John Richards, William, Edward, Isobel, Elizabeth, Alexander, Charles, Mary)

(SF: John McKay (d. 1810)).

Daughter Isabella married Joseph Beioley (Moose Factory Register, Ontario Archives).

MCKAYJOH

Biog: John McKay (d. 1810) MGM:wg/01/88; rev. DA 4/12/91

Donald McKay and Elspeth Kennedy had at least two sons that entered the Fur trading through the Northwest Company. Donald and Alexander, and the younger son was named William. The question is this Donald the one called Mad McKay? All the families I checked at that time period had upwards of 16-18 children.

This Alexander McKay spelled his name both ways, and he was the one that was with McKenzie. William was a hero in the war of 1812 vs the US. (Carma we won that one.) The sister Catherine married Simon Fraser, of whom the Fraser River in B.C. is named, who was also in the Northwest Company.

Researchers have been trying to confirm this connection, and all we know is they all seem to have come from the Mohawk Valley in New York after 1776. The Campbells, McKays, McKenzie, etc. all seem to tie in with the Black Watch, a regiment sent in 1754 to fight the French at Fort Ticonderoga on the end of Lake Champlain.(soon to be the 6th Great Lake), during the Seven Years War.

It was common to send the Boys back to the old country to be educated, however, Alexander McKenzie was only about 9 years old in 1776, and he was sent to live with Aunts in Montreal. We know that Donald, Alexander & William were all in the Northwest Company as clerks in 1791, how much earlier Alexander Mckay had joined the Northwest Company is not known.

We know that Alexander was at Fort Chipewyan (Alta.)in 1792, since on Jan 10, 1793 Alexander McKenzie asked that he be transferred to Fort Fork (Peace River) because " he would be of great service to me should I undertake any expedition."

In 1788 John McKay was working for Alexander Shaw and his son Angus at Lake St. Ann ( Lake Nipigon, Ont.) The indications are that Donald and John were brothers and they left the Northwest Company in 1790 and went to Fort Albany(Ont.) to join the Hudson's Bay Company.

As Margaret has posted, we would love to tie John and Alexander together, but we can't confirm this, or confirm other information that's is contrary. One thing is for sure, he had a brother named Alexander, or the name would not have been repeated so many times through each generation. But we do not have any Donalds, so to me that indicates that John and Donald were probably not related.

But, Alexander's wife was Marguerite Wadin McKay McLoughlin. Alexander was killed at Clayoquot Sound in 1811 after leading an expedition from the Columbia River up the Pacific Coast.He left his son Tom in the Care of Alexander Ross. Alexander and his son Thomas were well known in the Oregon Country. Marguerite then married Dr. Waddens. We have a Marguerite as well, but she died at age 6 in a house fire. There should be more in Oregon History. Jay

********

From Stan Hulme-FTM Favel File-Nov,1998

John is identified in FMN ID 3411. He is also identified in MF pages 768 and 770. His date of birth in MF is given as c1763. Although, as yet unconfirmed there is a possibility he is a son of Donald McKay. If this is true it is more likely that he was born before 1757 as Donald was serving in Canada with the 78th Regiment of Foot, Fraser's Highlanders by 1757 and did not complete his service until about 1763, at which time he brought his family to North America to settle in the Mohawk Valley. John is identified as the younger brother of Donald who was born about 1753 in Clyne.

The mother of his wife is only identifed as Titameg, and her native hertitage group is likely to be Cree (she is identified as Cree in the book "Beyond The Gates of Lower Fort Garry" pg 272). She is also identified in the book "Many Tender Ties" page 269 note 44 and the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Volume V, page 534.

John is identified as the younger brother of Donald in the Winter 1954 edition of The Beaver, page 20 where it states that Donald and John had been "pedlars" in the fur country from the early 1780s. They apparently joined the Hudson's Bay Company in 1791. In 1793 John, with James Sutherland, entered the Winnipeg River area, and settled on Rainy River, just below Manitou Falls. John was Master at Brandon House in 1808.

John's biography is included in the Dictionary of Canadian Biographies Volume V, 1801 to 1820, pages 534 and 535 as follows:

"McKay, John, fur trader; probably the brother of Donald "Mad" MacKay; m. c. 1791 Mary Favell, daughter of John Favell and his Indian wife Titameg; d. 5 July 1810 at Brandon House (Man.) and was buried there beside his wife.

There is some indication that John McKay and Donald MacKay came from the valley of the Brora River, Scotland. They entered the fur trade by way of Montreal, and by 1788 John was working for Alexander Shaw and his son Angus at Lake St Ann (Lake Nipigon, Ont.). In 1790 he and Donald went to Fort Albany (Ont.) to join the Hudson's Bay Company (entered service on 11 October 1790). Donald taking with him a plan for crippling the Nor'Westers by competing with their communication posts and supply bases.

The HBC adopted a modified version of this scheme and for the next two decades John played an important part in carrying it out. For the summer of 1791 and the outfit of 1792-93 he was sent back to Lake St Ann, an area poor in furs, but for the next four outfits he was assigned to the more important Rainy Lake post (near Fort Frances, Ont.). There he faced opposition led by Charles Boyer, Peter Grant, Donald McIntosh, and others, who found that he enjoyed peaceful and friendly competition but was not to cowed by threats of violence. Despite the superior numbers of his competitors he obtained about half the trade of the area.

In April 1797 James Sutherland, the master at Brandon House, died and McKay was sent to replace him for the next outfit. Three seasons at Osnaburgh House and Martin Falls (Ont) followed. Then in the autumn of 1801 he was posted back to Brandon House, where, with the exception of the outfit of 1806-7, he remained in charge until his death in 1810.

From Brandon House he sometimes sent his traders on dangerous expeditions as far afield as the Mandan country (in the vicinity of Stanton, N. Dak.) [see Alexander Henry]. At his post he was at first encircled by houses competing with one another, but after the consolidation of the North West and New North West (XY) companies in 1804 the opposition united against him and became more effective. However, even though his men were greatly outnumbered and he was often short of goods, McKay continued to obtain more than his share of the trade. At the same time he accomplished the strategic aim of disrupting and weakening the provisioning system of the Nor'Westers, who were dependent for pemmican and other supplies on their Red River posts.

From about 1804 he began to show signs of failing health, and in January 1810 he contracted a cold which persisted till his death on 5 July. His wife died in childbirth on 19 March of that year. They were survived by three daughters and five sons, of whom John Richards and William were the most notable.

With McKay's passing the HBC lost one of its most loyal and zealous servants. In letters to Albany the London committee had expressed appreciation of his work, and in 1794 he was nominated to the Albany council. He was liked also by his opponents, for he was always considerate of those in trouble.

When in 1805 John Pritchard was lost on the prairies and found almost dead from starvation McKay cared for him, and Pritchard wrote later, 'My friend McKay of the Hudson's Bay Company . . . became both my surgeon and nurse.'

The following winter McKay himself became so ill he was delirious, and his opponents Pritchard, Charles Chaboillez, and Pierre Falcon took turns in watching over him - surely a tribute to a troublesome rival. He also enjoyed a remarkable degree of friendship and loyalty of many Indians who found him just, reliable, and sympathetic.

McKay's journals were written for the information of his employers and disclose little of his private life. They do show, however, that he was a family man, watching over and often employing his wife's brothers. As his older sons became useful he sometimes noted their accomplishments with pride. He is revealed as a man of even temperament and humane disposition, with a sound understanding of the men who opposed him and the Indians with whom he traded. His journals rise above the usual recording of weather and daily happenings and are among the most interesting of the period."

More About John R McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 768 &770 b c1763
Fact 4: Sprague & Frye #3411
Fact 5: see notes in Stan Favel file
Fact 6: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000
Fact 7: Eileen shows as b: 1763
Fact 8: William Meek shows him as b: 1753 in Clyne, Sutherlandshire, Scotland

More About Mary Favell:
Fact 1: March 19, 1810, died in childbirth
Fact 2: Source 1. Little Bearskin McKay Clan-on-line Canada Tree
Fact 3: 2. Will of father John Favell, Jr
Fact 4: from Stan's FTM Favel- Nov 1998
Fact 5: Gail Morin Metis Families pg 770
Fact 6: Metis

Children of John McKay and Mary Favell are:

34 i. John Richards McKay, born August 10, 1792 in Albany Factory, Northwest Territories; died December 09, 1877 in St. Clement's Manitoba, Canada; married (1) LeReine? Trottier; married (2) Harriet Ballenden January 21, 1821 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land; married (3) Catherine (Smith) White Abt. 1855 in Manitoba, Canada.

ii. William McKay, born 1793 in Albany Factory, James Bay; died March 12, 1864 in St. Andrews, Red River Settlement, Manitoba, Canada; married Mary Bunn January 27, 1815 in St. Pauls, Red River Settlement.

Notes for William McKay:
William is identified in FMN ID 3416 as protestant Metis, his father's ID is 3411. He is also identified in Metis Families pages 162 and 782. He is buried at St Andrew's.

William joined the Hudson's Bay Company in 1809. In 1832 he was appointed to the charge of Mistassini, where he remained until his retirement to Red River in 1857. In George Simpson's Character Book of 1832 he is describe as " a half breed.... about 42 Years of Age 21 years in the Service. Nothing respectable about him either in conduct of character, and neither active nor useful - but retained in the Service to prevent his being troublesome to us. Stationed at Ruperts River. Nine out of Ten of those half breeds are little better than Interpreters, deficient in Education - bearing indifferent Characters and having no claim to a prospect of advancement." It should be noted that Simpson's previous notes before 1830 contain little of these derogitory remarks: 1823, 'excellent young man, active sober extremely willing'; 1825, 'very anxious in the performance of his duty'; 1827, 'steady, sober man'. Since Simpson's comments in his 1832 Book are, for the most part, derogatory about the majority of Servants of the Company I think it is safe to assume that William had not changed as much as Simpson had. (see notes on Edward McKay for reference) William's head stone reads: "Sacred to the memory of William McKay who died March 12, 1864 AE 71 YRS and Mary His Wife Who Died May 27, 1873 AE 75 Yrs. Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord. This stone is erected to their memory by their sorrowing daughter Louisa Robertson." A photograph of the headstone is held on file.

More About William McKay:
Fact 1: January 1998, Data from Jay Hunter, Kelowna, BC, CAN
Fact 2: death date from Margaret Clarke-Canada Tree
Fact 3: Sprague & Fife 3416, P, RRS, Metis
Fact 4: 1864, this death date from Stan's Favell FTM
Fact 5: buried at St Andrew's, RRS
Fact 6: Gail Morins' Metis Families pgs 162 & 782

Notes for Mary Bunn:
Mary BUNN
BIRTH: 15 APR 1798
DEATH: 27 MAY 1873, ,Red River
BURIAL: St. Andrews,Red River,Manitoba
REFN: w21
Family 1: William MACKAY
DIVORCE: N
MARRIAGE: 8 JAN 1858, St. Paul's,Red River
Mary, her brother John, Harriet Ballenden, daughter of former Govenor John Ballenden and Catherine Sinclair, daughter of William Sinclair were the first four pupils to start school at York Factory. See Harriet Ballenden for rest of story.

More About Mary Bunn:
Fact 1: Sprague & Fife- 3412, Metis, Protestant
Fact 2: Aunt of John Favell, Jr.
Fact 3: death dates from Margaret Clarke- Canada Tree
Fact 4: from Stan's FTM Favel- Nov 1998
Fact 5: Gail Morin Metis Families pg 162 & 782
Fact 6: buried at St. Andrews, Manitoba

iii. Edward McKay, born 1795; died 1836.

Notes for Edward McKay:

from Stan's Favell file nov 1998

In George Simpson's Character Book of 1832 he was described as 'a half breed from the Southern Shores of the Bay. About 35 years of age, has been 17 years in the Service. Unsteady and of indifferent character. Was a deserter from the HBC to the North West Coy during opposition and now retained in the Service to keep him out of the hands of Petty Traders, but like many of his breed would be discharged if we were not apprehensive that he would in that case give us trouble. Stationed at Lake Huron." (Hudson's Bay Miscellany 1670-1970 edited with introductions by Glyndwr Williams, PH D, publish for Hudson's Bay Record Society, 1975)

More About Edward McKay:
Fact 1: January 1998, Source John Hunter
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 784
Fact 4: 1815, joined HBC then deserted to Northwest Co then
Fact 5: 1822, rejoined HBC
Fact 6: 1832, in charge of Isle au Sable
Fact 7: 1833, retired from HBC
Fact 8: Metis

iv. Isobella McKay, born 1797; died Abt. 1835 in Rupert's House; married Joseph Beloisey.

More About Isobella McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Metis
Fact 3: from Stan's Sinclair FTM Nov 1998
Fact 4: Gail Morin MF pag 784

Notes for Joseph Beloisey:
Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudsons Bay' Dec, 1998

Joseph is identified in the book 'Hudson's Bay Miscellany 1670-1870' pages 177 and 178. He entered the HBC services in 1800 and became a Chief Factor at Moose Factory, retiring in 1843. Simpson's character Sketch of 1832 follows:

"About 50 years of age. A steady well conducted little man whose word can be depended upon; tolerably well Educated, and particular and economical in business to excess if possible, as his peculiarities in those respects adapt him better for operations on a contracted than an extended scale. He is not generally liked bing considered vain, touchy and vindictive, but I have always been most pleased with his whole demeanour conduct and management, and his strict intergrity & veracity I think cover all his faults; in short, I consider him one of the most valuable members of the Fur Trade."

More About Joseph Beloisey:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: see notes

v. Elizabeth McKay, born Abt. 1799 in Northwest Territories; died 1817 in Northwest Territories; married Cuthbert James Jr Grant May 22, 1814 in Ft Gibralter, Northwest Territories.

Notes for Elizabeth McKay:
from Stan's Favell FTM Nov 1998

Elizabeth 'Bethsy' was courted by Cuthbert Grant while she and her family were living at Brandon House during the early 1800's. Cuthbert was working for the North West Company and used to stop at Brandon House during his journies from the Nor'Westers' posts of Qu'Appelle and Gilraltar. Cuthbert became good friends with John Richards, Elizabeth's brother and eventually 'married' Elizabeth. She disappeared with her son James in 1817 while Cuthbert was on trial in Montreal for his part in the Seven Oaks battle.

More About Elizabeth McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: 1817, disappeared with her son while husband on trial for Seven Oaks Revolt
Fact 3: 1817, shown as death date in Stan's Favell FTM
Fact 4: Gail Morin MF pag 784

Notes for Cuthbert James Jr Grant:

>From Phyllis Nowosad, email, Sept 24, 1998, Your Poitras Genealogy

Educated in Scotland. Became a clerk of the North West Company in 1812; served first at Qu’Appelle and later in Red River region at the time when the clash between the Nor’Westers and the HBC was most bitter and violent. Had great influence with the Metis. Having been involved in the Seven Oaks massacre of 1816, he was arrested in 1817 and imprisoned. In 1818 he returned to the West. Served breify as a clerk in the HBC 1823-24 and in 1824 founded Grantown, (later St. francois Xavier ), a settlement of Metis farmers and buffalo hunters. Appointed warden of the Plains ( 1828-49) by the HBC. Councillor of Assinibois 1839-54 [1] From Paulette Boudreault-Gilbert - by email- May 2, 1998 Cuthbert Grant with his group were the first to raise the red with white lazy eight flag signifying Metis unity? There are quite a few books out on him....see if you can get your hands on Grant's Early Life Cuthbert Grant 1793-1854 No one knows anything about what happened to him overseas..sent there to be educated. 19 in 1812 appointed clerk at Fort Esperance, Qu'Apelle River, NW Considered a gentleman by his white side, moonias (greenhorn) by t'other. Was used by both sides of the two companies till he realized it.. Became the leader of the Metis, founder of 'New Nation' says here....enemy of the Scottish settlers...doubt that tho...you cannot become an enemy of your own race....but something happened to make him raise arms..:( :) Original flag was sewn by a cousin(John Mcdonnel) from bits and pieces they had...Red with white unity sign on it...nowadays many use the blue with the white lazy eight..some have asked me why the two colors...I've explained to those...it's not the color that matters, it's the unity sign which connects us all that is critical..:) Discussed this some time back with Audrey Poitras, President of the Present Day Metis Nation of Alberta and she smiled and noded yes..:)Others have in passing told me he is someone who was not correctly understood...can imagine...think of how it would of seemed to have been shifted overseas and come back and find yourself not really part of any world, hmmm? From what I've read, it seems he eventually had to side with his original roots as whatever was going on...could not be allowed to continue....sooo, in not ever being able to go back in history only strive to understand it...the first sign of something being drastically wrong started way back then..but he is actually the first to raise that flag..:) What I've noticed tho...the Metis did not go to battle unless they had been pushed much too far...for they had both cultures always in mind even back then, k? :)Others might be able to add more...something about a mill...but my memory fails me on that just now...hope this helps...some notes I've kept at this end...another we can be proud of...he left his mark and we have to find the clues to match them all up with the pieces we all are working on...:)

more stories in Stan's Favell file, Nov 1998

from Stan's Grant file Dec 1998

Fort Tremblante was located on the north bank of the Riviere Tremblante or Aspen Creek about a half-mile east of its confluence with the Assiniboine. At this point there is a a ridge running parallel with the river, and here on "a beautiful slope where the hill slips into a wide river flat' stood Grant's boyhood home. Cuthbert was born of Scottish, Cree and perhaps French descent (see book, Cuthbert Grant of Grantown by Margaret Arnett MacLeod and W. L. Morton)

Cuthbert joined the North West Company in 1812, and in 1816 was appointed 'Captain General of all the half-breeds in the country.' Later that year he led a party of Metis in the massacre at Seven Oaks, was arrested in 1817 by Selkirk, but slipped bail in the summer of 1818. He was not admitted to the Hudson's Bay Company until two years after the coalition of 1821, and then at the direct instigation of Simpson, who had met him in 1822.

He formally retired from the Company's service in 1824, but remained closely associated with Simpson and in 1828 was made 'Warden of the Plains' at Red River. He held the post until 849. He died at his farm on White Horse Plains. (Hudson's Bay Miscellany 1670-1870 edited and introductions by Glynddwr Williams, PH.D. published for Hudson's Bay Record Society 1975) and is buried at St Francios Xavier, Manitoba

BIOGRAPHIES

CUTHBERT GRANT (1793-1854) "WAPESTON: WHITE ERMINE"

By Lorraine Freeman

The Metis Resource Centre

Cuthbert Grant Jr. was born in 1793, at Fort de la Riviere Tremblante. Cuthbert’s father, Cuthbert Sr. was a partner and trader with the North West Company; his mother was a Métis Cree woman. He had one brother, (James) and three sisters, (Josephte, Mary and Marie Marguerite). When Cuthbert’s father died in 1799, in accordance with his father's will, William McGillvary, Director of the North West Company, became Cuthbert’s guardian. Cuthbert was baptized October 12, 1801, at age eight in the Scottish Church on St. Gabriel Street in Montreal, a church his father donated money to help build. Cuthbert’s father's will also stated that he wished his sons to be educated in Scotland. Cuthbert spent approximately the next ten years of his life in Scotland. He returned to Montreal at the age of nineteen and was appointed clerk at Fort Esperance on the Qu’Appelle River.

In 1812, there was a growing conflict between the two major companies, the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company. 1812 also marked the arrival of the first colonists. The Nor’ Wester’s saw the colonists as a threat to the fur trade and supply of pemmican. The conflict grew. In 1814, Governor Miles Macdonald made a proclamation prohibiting the sale of pemmican from the Assiniboine, in fear of starvation of the colony. The North West Company needed pemmican as food supply for the voyageurs. The Métis depended on the sale of pemmican to the Nor’ Westers to support their families. A second proclamation ordered the stop of running buffalo at the Red River Settlement. The Métis felt that they were the true owners of the North West and need not obey these laws. The Nor’ Westers were, after all the New Nation.

Cuthbert Grant, Peter Pangman, William Shaw and Nicholas Montour were appointed 'Captains of the Métis'. In March, 1816, the Métis appointed Cuthbert Grant as 'Captain - General of all the Half-Breeds' (Métis). In May Cuthbert and his men set out to Brandon House with the intention of destroying it. Peter Fidler of Brandon House recorded the first sighting of the Métis Flag,

'At half past noon about 48 Half-Breeds, Canadians, Freemen and Indians came riding on horseback with their flag flying, blue, about 4 feet square and a figure 8 horizontally in the middle'. June 19th The Battle of Seven Oaks occurred with Governor Semple and twenty of his men killed on Frog Plain. Cuthbert and the Métis then took Fort Douglas. Settlers who wanted to leave the Red River Settlement were offered protection by Cuthbert. Cuthbert was later to face charges in Montreal arising from the fight but never actually went to trial. While Cuthbert was away his wife Elizabeth McKay and their son disappeared and were never heard from again.

George Simpson was concerned about the conflict between the Sioux and the Métis living at Pembina and, knowing that Pembina would be south of the 49th parallel, he asked Grant for his help to establish a new community 29 kilometres west of Fort Garry. This was the district of White Horse Plains. They formed the community of Grantown with 80 Métis families who were displaced from Pembina,. The people of Grantown supplied fur traders with pemmican, and being some of the best fighters, they acted as a buffer between the Sioux and the Red River Settlement. In 1823, Cuthbert married Marie McGillis and established a permanent home in Grantown. Cuthbert built a flour mill along the banks of Sturgeon Creek, now known as "Grant's Old Mill". He was also a private freighter.

In 1824, Grant transported goods by York Boats to and from Norway House and the Red River Settlement along with the voyageurs of Grantown. The American Fur Trade Companies entering the north west were an ever increasing problem. In July 1828, the Hudson's Bay Company passed a resolution appointing Cuthbert Grant 'Warden of the Plains' to stop the illicit trade of furs in the North West. This position also included organizing buffalo hunts and protecting the settlement. In 1835, he was appointed to the Council of Assiniboia as the Métis representative. Grant was also responsible for negotiating treaties with the Dakota people. In 1837, General James Dickson, a self styled liberator of the Indian Nations, proposed to raise an army of the Métis to march south to free the American Indian and establish an Indian kingdom in California. Grant provided him with guides to lead him into the U.S. and the General gave him his epaulets and sword. (Which can be found in the Manitoba Museum).

Grantown’s religious ceremonies were held in Grant's home until the first church was built in 1829. A larger church was built in 1833, right beside the humble one. Father Harper also used Grant's home as a school, when instructing the children.

While in Scotland, Cuthbert was said to have received training in European medicine. He was called upon to help the sick and wounded. Grant travelled far and wide to help families deal with epidemics of small pox and measles. He travelled with his medicine chest strapped behind him as he rescued people caught on the plains without food or medical help. (His medicine chest can also be found at the Manitoba Museum). In his latter years Cuthbert Grant served as counsellor and magistrate. At age 59 he served once more as governor of the buffalo hunt.

In 1854, Grant was injured in a fall from his horse. On the 15th of July, 1854, he died much to the sorrow of the Métis of Grantown. The people of Grantown honoured him by burying him under the altar of the church. Later the church burnt down and it is said that Highway # 26 now covers Cuthbert Grant, the first leader of the Métis. Cuthbert Grant (1793-1854) 'Wapeston: White Ermine'

Here is the tale of our relative Cuthbert Grant as written by George Simpson in "The Honourable Company".

EXERTS from the book: 'The Honourable Company , A History of The Hudson's Bay Company.' By Douglas MacKay, McClelland & Stewart Ltd. This book is a well worn paper back that I bought for .25 cents at a local used book store. It was first printed in 1936, by The Biibs-Merrill Company. I have had hours of enjoyment for my quarter.

The observations in the Character Book on Cuthbert Grant of Seven Oaks is interesting for its description of the control of half-breeds, but more for a generous willingness to forgive and forget: "A half-breed whose name must long recal to mind some horrible Scenes which in  former Days took place at Red River Settlement in which he was the principle actor - About 38 years of Age, during 29 of which he has been more or less connected with the Service- A generous Warm hearted man who would not of been guilty of the crimes laid to his charge had he not been driven into them by designing Men- A very stout powerful fellow of great nerve & resolution but now getting unwieldy and inactive. Drinks ardent spirits in large quantities, thinks nothing of a Bottle of Rum at a Sitting but is so well Seasoned that he is seldom intoxicated altho it undermines his constitution rapidly--A sensible clear headed man of good conduct except in reference to the unfortunate habits of temperance he has fallen into. Entirely under the influence of the Catholic Mission and quite a Bigot.-The American Traders have made several liberal offers to him, but he has rejected them all being now a staunch Hudson's Bay Man and we allow him a Saly. Of 200 P. annum as "Warden of the Plains" which is a Sinecure afforded him intirely from political motives and not from any feeling of liberality or partiality. The appointment prevents him from interfering with the Trade on his own account which he would otherwise do in all probability; it more over affords us the benefit of his great influence over half- breeds and Indians of the neighborhood which is convenient inasmuch as it exempts us from many difficulties with them. He resides at the White House plain about 16 miles up the Assiniboine River where he has a Farm and only visits the Establishment (Fort Garry) on business of by invitation; but he is always ready to obey our command and is very effective when employed as a Constable among the half- breeds or Indians - is perfectly satisfied with what has been done for him which is quite Sufficient and has no prospect for advancement".  Today is a history-packed room of Beaver House in London where the rumble of traffic in the Great Trinity Lane is heard faintly, this Book of servants' character can be examined leisurely. And to just think, this great man is a relative of ours. I love it. Simpson has this note at the start of the book: "The Honourable Company's affairs in this quarter, I am happy to say, look well: the Trade is in a prosperous state and the Natives more orderly and appear better disposed than they have been for some time" - George Simpson, governor-in-chief of the Hudson's Bay terriories to William Smith, of the London Committee. York Factory, 20 August 1830. Kind regards, Joyce Rozell, All My Relations.

More About Cuthbert James Jr Grant:
Baptism: October 12, 1801, Presbyterian, Montreal
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: 1793, from Phyllis Nowosad email Sept 1998
Fact 3: from Stan-Grant file, Dec 1998
Fact 4: Bonnie Harrington Research

vi. Alexander McKay, born May 18, 1805 in Brandon House, Manitoba, Canada; died May 25, 1842 in Rupert's House; married Catherine Robertson June 30, 1833 in Rupert's House.

More About Alexander McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 784
Fact 4: Metis

More About Catherine Robertson:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 784

vii. Charles Richard (Sr) McKay, born February 08, 1808 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land; died May 28, 1873 in Glencoe, Washington County (now North Plains), Oregon, USA; married (1) Marguerite Walla Walla; married (2) Letitia Bird October 02, 1827 in St John's, RRS.

Notes for Charles Richard (Sr) McKay:

>From Carma McKay, Feb 18, 1998

Today I was researching the McKay line t;hat come to Washington County (formerly Tislitan County) in the Oregon Territory in 1841. There was so much concern about being linked to Indian Blood that they make up a story to try to change our heritage. I found this article written about Charles Sr in The Dictionary of Oregon History. "McKay, Charles Richard 1808-1874 - Pioneer, was born 'on the Atlantic Ocean' enroute from Scotland to Canada. With his parents he settled in Manitoba, and in 1841, with his own family in a party headed by Gov. George Simpson, arrived at Fort Nisqually. He moved to Tualatin Planes in 1842, taking a claim on which he later founded the town of Glencoe ('named for the family home in Scotland') He became captain of militia under the provisional government in 1843; volunteer in the Cayuse War, 1847, achieving the rank of 1st Lieutenant. In 1849 he went to California gold mines, but returning to Oregon entered business in Portland for a time. He married in Manitoba in 1827, Letitia Byrd (Bird), the governor's daughter. They had four children. He is buried in Harrison Cemetary, near North Plains. He voted for Provisional Government at Champoeg in May 1843."

The history that I've read on Champoeg is that this was the vote that was taken to determine where the boundary between USA and Canada would be. 100 men voted. There were 2 Canadians that voted in favor of the USA. And that placed the border at the 49th parallel.

********

Stan Hulme Research:

Charles is identified in FMN ID 3386 as protestant Metis, his father's ID is 3411. He is also identified in MF page 784. This latter book identifies a second wife/partner, Marguerite Walla Walla and a child to that relationship - Adelaide McKay b. Jun 1845 Oregon, baptized Jun 10, 1845 at St James Mission, Vancouver Oregon.

Editor's note: date of death was obtained from FTM Titameg Descendants, courtesy of Serena Willis and Charles' middle name came from Carma McKay (Karma32813@aol.com). Charles is also identified in "The Selkirk Settlers..." page 3-2 under ID# 271. He is also identified in MF(2001) Volume 1 pages 184 and 187.

More About Charles Richard (Sr) McKay:
Burial: Harrison Cemetery, North Plains, Oregon, USA
Fact 1: Sprague & Fife 3386, P, NWT, Metis
Fact 2: Source T. C. McCloy
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research

More About Marguerite Walla Walla:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: MF page 784

Notes for Letitia Bird:
Letitia is identified in FMN as protestant. She is also identified in "The Selkirk Settlers..." page 3-2 under ID# 253. She is identified in MF(2001) Volume 1 pages 184 and on 187 as follows: "Letitia Bird; born 20 Feb 1810 (Denney); married Charles McKay, son of John McKay and Mary Favel, 2 Oct 1827 St. Johns (HBCR, M-130); died 26 Feb 1897 at age 87 (T. R. "Pat" McCloy, McKay Descendancy)"

More About Letitia Bird:
Burial: Harrison Cemetery, North Plains, Oregon, USA
Fact 1: Sprague & Fife 3386, P, Metis
Fact 2: Source T. C. McCloy
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research

viii. Mary McKay, born March 19, 1810 in Brandon House, Manitoba, Canada; died Unknown in USA; married (1) William Dowland; married (2) John Philip Bird March 26, 1826 in St John's, RRS; married (3) John Calder Aft. 1838.

More About Mary McKay:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Sprague & Fife 376, Metis
Fact 3: Stan Hulme Research, "The Selkirk Settlers.." page 3-3 under ID# 265; and in MF(2001) Volume 1 pages 184, 186, 381 and 362.

More About William Dowland:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

Notes for John Philip Bird:
John is identified in FMN ID 376. He is also identified in Metis Families page 92. He is further identified in "The Selkirk Settlers..." page 3-3 under ID# 254. He is also identified in MF(2001) Volume 1 pages 184 and on 186 as follows: "John Bird; born circa 1809 (ibid); married Mary McKay, daughter of John McKay and Mary Favel, 29 Mar 1826 St. Johns (HBCR, M-116); died 15 Oct 1839 near Pembina (Denney). He was also known as Jack (1828C, page 6). Cause of death: He was shot by Thomas Simpson on 15 Oct 1839 near Pembina (Denney)." Both he and James Bruce were shot and killed near Pembina 15 Oct 1839 by Thomas Simpson, nephew of Governor Simpson.

More About John Philip Bird:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 92 and MF (2001) Volume 1 pages 184 and 187.

More About John Calder:
Died 2: 1850, California during the Gold Rush
Fact 1 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 1 2: Furtrade Database-Stan Hulme
Fact 2 1: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 2 2: MF pg 168 as died in Washington
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 168
Fact 4: according to Gail he died in Washington
Fact 5: another reference has death in California during Gold Rush

70. John Ballenden, born 1758 in Stromness, Orkney Islands, Scotland; died May 23, 1817. He married 71. Jane Cree.

71. Jane Cree.

Notes for John Ballenden:

>From the Edmonton House Journal, Journal of William Tomison 1797-1798

As these are very rare, they are under lock and key, and we are not allowed to photo copy, so I have to take notes.

June 24, 1799 Monday:

Wind and weather much the same as yesterday. At half past 3:00 a.m. we proceeded and in the afternoon we arrived at Gordon House where we found John Ballendan ( Ballendeen) and those with him well. (note by HBC) John Ballendan ( Ballenden) b 1758 suceede Joseph Colen at York factory in 1798. Ballendan came from Stroness, Orkney Islands and began with the HBc in 1770 as a servant to Andrew Graham. In 1775 he was accepted as a writer at 15 pounds per anum and he was at Fort Prince of Wales when it was destroyed by the French under La Perouse in 1782. Ballenden returned to HB in 1783 as assistant to Humphrey Martin at York Fort. From Sept. 1786 - August 1796 he was master at Severn River and it was after an absence of 2 years in Europe that he suceeded Colen at York.

June 28, 1799

Mr. Ballenden set out for York ( there is more, and an entry for each day of the year)

July 29, 1799

At 3:00 a.m. we proceeded and paddled until 2 p.m. and arrived at York, found Mr. Ballenden and all at York well. Canoes were under the direction of James Bird.

William Tomison

Journal Albany Fort 1723

Listed John McCoar also shown in 1775

Letters received May 20, 1724 at Albany from head office of HBC

As to Mr. Myat's instructions, The Company is very much displeased to hear that any Indian has been taught to read and write or admitted into your trading room or to parye into ye secrets of their affairs in any matter with out our order and charge you strickly not to continue. HBC note: An Indian Lad had written a letter to the Company stating he wished to be Baptized.

Further letters from HBC refer to Mohawk Indians being employed by the North West Company. The Iroquois referred to were Mohawk Indians, from the Mohawk valley in upper New York State. They could read and write and were actively involved in the Ellice Company which had its headquarters in Schnectady New York before 1776. They had a branch office in Montreal. The Mohawks were employed because of their great skills and were active in trapping and trading Furs as far away as Fort Fraser, Mcleod's Lake which is North and West of Prince George British Columbia. Harmon's Journal called them Iroquois, but the HBC Journal shows Mohawks, as part of the  Iroquois 6 Nations. There are many, many names in these Journals, all the ones we are familiar with, but many more that I have not yet seen on our list.

Jay- moderator
Subject:
Re: John Ballenden
Date: Fri, 30 Jul 1999 19:21:40 -0700
From: Stan Hulme <nanitort@netcom.ca>
To: Lori Willcox <loriwillcox@home.com>
CC: Metis Genealogy <metisgen@listserv.northwest.com>

Hi Lori

Unfortunately I could not open your attachment so I do not know if the following was included from the HBC Archives. John Ballenden died at Stromness, Orkney Islands, Scotland on 23 May 1817 at the age of 62. He is buried at Stromness Kirkyard No 1 in grave identified as A157 and listed on page 9 in the book "The Kirkyards of Stromness & Graemsay", printed and published by The Orcadian Limited, Hell's Half Acre, Hatston, Kirkwall, Orkney, KW15 1DW. Copywrite Stromness Parish Church, published 1999; ISBN 1-902957-00-8. The headstone (which is lying flat on the ground) reads "Sacred to the memory of John Ballenden, late Chief of York Fort in the Honoura ble The Hudson's Bay Co Service, d. here 23 May 1817 aged 62". According to information I received from the Orkney Family History Society,

John also disposed of his property in Stromness on 28 Mar 1817 to his son William, who was a surgeon in Stromness, his daughter Elizabeth, widow of James Bannatyne, late Fishery Officer, John Ballenden, Chief Factor Red River and John McNab Ballenden, M.D., Sidgley, Dudley, Staffordshire. Since John Jr was only 6 and John McNab only about 4 when their father died I have to assume that the designations "Chief Factor Red River" and "M.D." were added at a later date.

If the bio you received from HBC Archives is the same as the one I copied when I was in Winnipeg it states that "Ballenden retired from the Company's service and returned to Scotland in 1802" I think there is some info missing or the children attributed to him and Jane: James b. c1806, George b. 4 Feb 1807 and Mary b. 1808 belong to someone else. I also have a ref that has him and Jane marrying at Brandon House in 1815???????

Take care and enjoy

Stan

Subject: John Ballenden
Date: Fri, 30 Jul 1999 21:38:04 -0700
From: John Hunter <jay@cnx.net>
To: metisgen@listserv.northwest.com

Stan;

There is something wrong with the dates: The Canadian Archives has school records for York factory and letters from John Ballenden dated at York Factory that were sent to Albany, which are later than the dates shown.

Harriet Ballenden ( wife of John Richards Mckay ) the daughter of John Ballenden and his Cree wife Jane is shown as a student at the school. One daughter married Chief Factor Lewis, and it appears that they raised the youngest daughter of John and Jane. See Script records.

Ther is little doubt that John Ballenden had two families, one here and one in Scotland.

Jay

More About John Ballenden:
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 17, 1999
Fact 2: see note sent by John Hunter
Fact 3: see notes from Stan Hulme

More About Jane Cree:
Fact 1: Paulette email 1999 with husband John

More About Elizabeth Gray:
Fact 1: Paulette email Feb 17, 1999

Children of John Ballenden and Jane Cree are:

i. Elizabeth Ballendine, married William Rowland August 21, 1838 in Norway House, NWT.

More About Elizabeth Ballendine:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

More About William Rowland:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

35 ii. Harriet Ballenden, born Abt. 1795 in York Factory, Canada; died August 28, 1854 in Shoal River, Manitoba; married John Richards McKay January 21, 1821 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land.

Child of John Ballenden and Elizabeth Gray is:

i. John Ballenden, married Sarah McLeod December 10, 1836 in St Andrews, Red River Settlement.

Notes for John Ballenden:
Source: Furtrade Database, Stan Hulme Research
John is identified in "A Dictionary of Scottish Emigrants to Canada before Confederation" by Donald Whyte. He is found on page 12 line ID 308. According to this book he was from Stennes Orkney Islands and came through Montreal for employment with the Hudson's Bay Company. He is identified in MF page 45 (he is incorrectly place in this reference as the son of John and Jane Cree where, in fact, he is the son of John and Elizabeth Gray) as having been born in Stromness and baptized on Jun 26, 1811 at Stromness. In the International Genealogical Index (see notes on Andrew) his date of baptism is given as 6 Jun 1811 at Stromness. He is also identified as John Ballendine in the Index, his father is identified as John Ballendine, although his mother is still identified as Elizabeth Gray.

He was Master at either Fort Severn or York and apparently his father was also Master at one of these posts in the 1700s. He married Sarah at St Andrew's, Red River Settlement in 1836. He was Chief Factor at Fort Garry in 1850. He married Sarah McLeod, who is described as the exquisitely beautiful mixed blood daughter of Chief Trader Alexander McLeod. She became involved in the Foss-Pelly sex scandal of 1850 (see Caesars fo the Wilderness by Peter C. Newman pages 430-434). She died of consumption in 1853, in Scotland, at the age of 35. In 1854 John's two daughters Annie and Elizabeth (Lizzie) returned to Red River after nearly a decade of schooling in England. According to one observer: "...they can play elegantly on the harp, guitar, piano, they sing melodiously and methodically, they can dance and waltz like true English dames..." The harp and piano belonging to the Misses Ballenden were carefully transported from York Factory to Red River, while the items listed in their private orders sent to England the next year show that they possessed extensive and fashionable wardrobes. ("Many Tender Ties" Women in Fur-Trade Society, 1670-1870 by Sylvia Van Kirk)

More About John Ballenden:
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan - April, 1999
Fact 2: see notes

Notes for Sarah McLeod:
Sarah is identified in Metis Families pg 45. She was baptized at St Johns on Apr 19, 1835. Her date of death in this book is given as Nov 10, 1836 which was a month before she was married, definitely incorrect. According to the book Many Tender Ties she died in Scotland when she was 35, in December 1853. "In 1853, Ballenden's own poor health forced him to retire from the Columbia, and he gave instructions for his family to proceed him to Scotland. There is evidence that a poignant reunion took place between husband and wife in Edinburgh before Sarah died of consumption in December of that year. A short time later Ballenden wrote to his daughter Eliza and told her of the concern which "your own dear mother" had expressed about the welfare of her children as she lay on her deathbed." (Many Tender Ties pg 229)

More About Sarah McLeod:
Baptised: April 19, 1835, St John's, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan - April, 1999
Fact 2: MF pg 45, see notes

80. Peter Fidler, born August 16, 1769 in Sutton Mills, Bolsover, Derbyshire, England; died December 17, 1822 in Fort Dauphin, NWT = MB, CAN. He was the son of 160. James Fidler and 161. Mary Glossup. He married 81. Mary (Cree Indian) Mackogonne Abt. October 1794 in York Factory, Rupert's Land.

81. Mary (Cree Indian) Mackogonne, born Abt. 1771 in York Factory, Rupert's Land; died June 20, 1826 in RRS.

Notes for Peter Fidler:
Subject: Peter FIDLER's descendants
Date: Mon, 12 Jul 1999 18:31:20 -0700
From: Joyce Rozell <joycerozell@home.com>
To: metisgen@genweb.net

I found this interesting page of facts in the above mentioned book & want to share them with all.

PETER FIDLER

Known as Canada"s Forgotten Explore 1769 - 1822.

"This Note" taken from a book on Peter Fidler as written by J G MacGregor. ISBN 1-894004-19-1

Pondering his will, 'What to do for the children gave him considerable concern. There were so many of them, ranging from infants to grown men, as shown in the following list which was included in one of his notebooks, which is still preserved'.

Year Month Day Hour Minute Name Place of Birth

**************************************************************************

1795 June 20 0 8 Thomas York Factory
1798 Oct 10 12 35 Charles Cumberland House
1800 Nov 10 12 15 George Chesterfield House
1802 Nov 26 2 3 Sally Nottingham House
1804 Oct 12 15 42 *Decus-roggan? Nottingham House
1806 Nov 29 22 5 0 Andrew Cumberland House
1809 June 17 4 0 Alban Holy Lake
1811 June 27 20 2 Mary Charlton Portage?/Chalk Portage?
1813 Aug 26 0 45 **Faith ? Red River
1814 Nov 24 8 30 Clement Brandon House
1817 Mar 5 11 10 Colette Halkett's House
1819 June 18 5 45 ***Margaret
1820 July 2 6pm Peter Norway House
1822 July 9 4 45 Harriet

* Decusroggan - Died 1814, March 6, 8am - ill twenty-four days

** Faith - Died at Brandon House, 6 Oct. at noon

*** Margaret - died July 21, 8.55, at Red River Forks.

I have read that Peter Fidler was a great bookkepper. I think the records he kept of his children confirms this.His many journals and books are preserved to this day. He was with the first expedition that went on to survey Lake Athabasca for The Hudson's Bay Company. With him were Philip Turner and Lorne Bouchard.

I posted this note here so descendants of Peter Fidler might use it in their tree. I still have to finish reading this interesting book.

Read and enjoy.

Kind Regards,

Joyce Rozell,

All My Relations.

**********

Subject: Philip TURNOR, Explorer

Date: Tue, 13 Jul 1999 10:18:19 -0700
From: Joyce Rozell <joycerozell@home.com>
To: margaret joan brick <mbrick@direct.ca>
CC: metisgen@genweb.net

Hi Margaret. I am sending along some of the writings on PHILIP TURNOR. I hope you find this bit interesting. I still have a long way to read in this book and will keep sending along bits now and then if you would like more.

I am also sending this to Metisgen in case there are more of the family interested in these families. Enjoy and have a great day.

Kind Regards,

Joyce Rozell,

All My Relations.

"Rise above the storm and you will find the sunshine"

From the book: PETER FIDDLER, Canada's Forgotten Explorer 1769 - 1822, ISBN 1-894004-19-1 Page 6.

'The old company's fat (HBC) was further in the fire now that the approach to York Factory by way of the Saskatchewan, and that to Fort Churchill via the Churchill river, were both tampered with (by the NWC). Now indeed returns to these factories would decrease, and of a certainty dividends would dwindle unless the Committee took further action and really established inland ports to compete actively with the NMC. But the Committee in London, laying plans to cope with the new threat and studying the journals of its many explorering traders, was handicapped by the lack of accurate maps. They decided to do something about this too, and soon started a two prong offensive; they would multiply their inland posts and push them up the Saskatchewan in competition with the NWC, and they would survey the rivers and lakes. On the one hand this resolve brought to the Saskatchewan scene one of the most active men of the early fur trade, William Tomison. On the other hand, it produced Philip Turnor, the company's (HBC) first surveyor. Turnor a great surveyor in his own right, took a number of young men under his wing and trained them. It was under his direction that both of the West's greatest surveyors, Peter Fidler and David Thompson, got their start. Turnor and these two young men were the instruments to be used as part of the plan to counter the NWC's threat.

Philip Turnor, an Englishman from Middlesex, was the first man employed as a surveyor. when, on October 11, 1778, he arrived at the Cumberland House and reported to William Tominson, he produced a letter from Humphrey Martin, the chief at York Factory, explaining his duties. In part it said:

"The Bearer Mr. Philip Turnor, being by the Governor Deputy Governor and Committee of the Honourable HBC's appointed their surveyors for settling the Latitudes, Longitudes, Courses, and different Settlements Inland, You are to give the said Gentleman all requisite and possible assistance to enable him to give all satisfaction in the above, or and other duties desired of him; he is to be treated in the most respectful manner and accommodated with every thing requiste to facilitate his Expedition; on this account the expenses it will Occasion, must be only Your secondary Object; and the Gentleman being desirous to have the earliest intelligence of Mr. Turnor's proceedings; You will transmit to US whatever He shall think worthy of their attentions;"

On page 8 we read a lot about the winter and the start of the Expeditions.

'To these two men (William Tomison & Philip Turnor), ready at their beck and call, were soon to be added two more men equally great, who, with their sextants and compasses, were to tease out the tangled skein of northern rivers and to present them neatly mapped for the Committee's consideration in the coming combat. These men were David Thompson and Peter Fiddler. As the years rolled along, these four men, Tomison, Turnor, Thompson, and Fiddler in various pairings and groupings carried the old company's banner, and in doing so left the imprint of their personalities on the history of the West. Thompson and Fiddler were to map much of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta."

***********

Excerpt from "Servants of the Honorable Company- Work, Discipline and Conflict in the Hudson's Bay Company, 1770-1879" Chapter 5 - The Denial of Duty pgs 188-189 by Edith L Burley ISBN 0-19-541296-6

"Such incidents had a degree of logic that even an unsympathetic employer could understand. Men with specialized skills did not want to place them at someone else's disposal at prices they considered unfair or work at something other than their trades..........In 1814, at Red River, Peter Fidler suspected Archibald Curry of plotting to conceal his indolence when he refused to dig sod by himself but insisted on working with another man, thereby making it impossible to know how much labour each had done. Fidler put Curry off duty for his insolence.

Such struggles for control could become running battles, as Fidler himself learned a few years later when he and his men disagreed over the number of sledges each should take when fetching meat. In January of 1816 Fidler ordered Richard Cunningham and John Flett to take three sledges of dogs. Since it was not unusual for one man to take two sledges by himself, Fidler did not consider his request unreasonable, but Cunningham refused to take more than one and Fidler fined him 10 shillings......"

***********

Peter Fidler - The Forgotten Geographer

Some years ago my history pal Dr. James Cousins came across an unpublished manuscript of Peter Fidler's journey entitled Journal of a Journey over Land from Buckingham House to the Rocky Mountains in 1792-93

As the 200 anniversary was approaching the decision was made to make available a few copies so that people would come to know the man called Cousins called The Forgotten Geographer and Dr James MacGregor in his book called Canada's Forgotten Surveyor.

In November of 1792 Peter Fidler, working for the Hudson Bay Company, journeyed from its most westerly post, Buckingham House , on the North Saskatchewan River near present-day Elk Point. He would be the first European to see the southern Alberta Rockies on an expedition to encourage trade with the Blackfoot of the plains and the native tribes of the mountains. On his way southwestward from the parklands across the plains, Fidler made a number of valuable observations about the way of life of the nomadic buffalo hunting peoples he encountered.

Fidler was the first European to explore and write about Southern Alberta. He was the first person to describe the cactus and the coal . He was the first to record the existence of Chinook winds and the only European to witness and record the spectacle of communal buffalo driving in the foothills, involving the use of strategically located cliffs or jumps or constructed corrals known as pounds .

In late December Fidler joined a group of Kutenai Indians camped just inside the front range of the mountains in an area known as the Gap of the Oldman River, north of the Crowsnest Pass.

Background on Peter Fidler:
Peter Fidler was born in Bolsover, Derbyshire, England and at the age of 19 years signed a 5 year contract with the Hudson Bay Co. (H.B.C.) as a labourer at York Factory. Because of competition between the H.B.C. and the North West Co. (N.W.C.), it became evident that trading posts be established inland among main waterways and with this decision, it was obvious that detailed maps of rivers and lakes be required to make further company decisions. Peter Fidler's brilliance, as well as his ability to read and write, soon became obvious to company officials and in 1790, Peter was called to learn the art of surveying.

During the winter of 1791, Peter mapped Lake Athabaska and made mention of the Tar Sands in his journals. Returning in the spring, he mapped the 1,600 mile route from York Factory to Athabaska and Great Slave Lake. That same year, Peter mapped the North Saskatchewan River and established a trading post. The winter of 1792-93, he surveyed and mapped the Battle, Red Deer and Bow Rivers, also outlining the Rockies (the first to indicate the Rockies on a map). During this trip, he was also the first explorer to see and record the coal at Drumheller. He also made notes of several passes in the Rockies which he heard of from the Kootenay and Snake Indians and he also made note of cactus, the buffalo and birch trees which were necessary for inland survival. In 1793, Peter mapped the Seal River. By 1797, Fidler became the only mapmaker for H.B.C. and in 1799, was sent to establish more trading posts and head a campaign against the N.W.C. During this time, he mapped a second shorter route to Athabaska via the Churchill River and became responsible for several posts he had established including Bolsover House, Greenwich House and Chesterfield House.

Once again, Peter Fidler was sent to Athabaska area and established Nottingham and Mansfield House. It was during this period of time that several years of misery and severe harassment were imposed on him from the N.W.C. and in 1806, all posts were abandoned and left to the competition. Fidler then took charge of Cumberland House and mapped Wallaston Lake area, Lake Winnipeg and the Nelson River outlet.

In 1812, he was sent to the Red River colony as assistant to Lord Selkirk and surveyed lots and supervised building of houses.

Peter Fidler was also a meteorologist. He kept records faithfully every day for over 30 years. His thermometer, wind vane and barometer were read many times a day and not even the Indian attack on York Factory in 1794 where 6 met their death interfered with his daily recordings. He also recorded bird migrations, the annual break up of ice and vegetation conditions. He even noted the different temperatures at which different liquors froze and also recorded the progress of his garden, making him one of Canada's first horticulturists. In his lifetime, Peter accumulated a library of over 500 volumes indicating his pleasure in the art of reading. It has also been noted that during his active years he travelled over 47,000 miles on foot and that most of our maps of Western Canada are based on his works. Peter Fidler was appointed District Master at Fort Dauphin in 1819 and died there in 1822. He lies in an unmarked grave at Fort Dauphin.

Peter's will should indicate to us the complexity of this amazing man. His invested estate was to pay interest to his wife and children until the youngest child became the age of 21 years. The principal was then to accumulate interest and to be left, both principal and interest, to the eldest direct grandson of his son Peter on his own 200th anniversary of his birthday, 1969.

*******

Louis "LIttle Fidler" Verhagen Database

!!Marriage was in the fall of 1794, near York Factory, MB, accordin g to Native custom. This marriage was formalized 14 August, 1821 at Norway House , MB by Rev John West, Hudson's Bay Chaplain.

!On 19 April, 1788, at age eighteen, Peter signed on, in London, Engl and as a labourer with the Hudson's Bay Company.

Peter Fidler and Mary Macagonnes marriage was confirmed by Church o f England rites by the Reverend John West at Norway House, NWT, on 18 Aug 1821 . Witt: Nicholas Garry and Donald Sutherland. They were first married by Indi an rites in the fall of 1794.

Our research indicates that of all members of this Fidler family dati ng back to the 1660s, Peter was the only one immigrating to Canada, at least, u p to the beginning of the 1900s.

It is unlikely the exact location of Peter Fidlers grave will ever b e known. It is known that he was burried on the site of the Hudsons Bay Co. For t Dauphin, Manitoba. This site is located approximately 15 miles north east of t he present day city of Dauphin, Manitoba, on the South West 1/4 of Section 18, T ownship 27, Range 18, West of the principal Meridian. The approximate location o f his grave is marked by a simple wooden monument engraved;- "Peter Fidler, 176 9 - 1822.

Buried in this area. Exact location is unknown."

************

More About Peter Fidler:
Burial: December 1822, Fort Dauphin, NWT = MB, CAN
Christening: September 17, 1769, Sutton, Cum, Duckmanton, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: #1547 Sprague & Frye
Fact 2: MF pg 357
Fact 3: see notes from his journals
Fact 4: Death date from Gloria C Lester <gclester@juno.com> Aug 9, 1999
Fact 5: Peter married Mary twice, first in a "Country Marriage in 1794 and second in a Christian Ceremony in 1821.
Fact 6: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002, see notes

Notes for Mary (Cree Indian) Mackogonne:
Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Research:

It is unlikely that further data on Mary Mackagonnes ancestors is av ailable. The only possibilities are that if Peter made a written record of his knowledge of her family whom he must have met at York Factory, or from information Mary would have given him in the course of their conversations, and if these records still exist.Their children may also have made note of their maternal ancestors. It is something to look for in our research.

In almost all sources consulted during our research references to Mary Include the phrase "Indian Woman" or "Cree Indian", taken from the fact that she was a Home Guard Cree Indian, a tribe that headquartered around the Hudson Bay Cos, establishments on Hudsons Bay. However , Charles D. Denney, in his papers held by the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, refers to her as "Mary, a Mackagonne" or "Mary Mackagonne". In order to give her a positive identity, we have adopted the name "Mary Mackagonne", a Cree woman, and that name is used throughout this recording. We are hopeful further research regarding Mary's identity will have positive results.

Mary was baptized for the second time 5 Apr 1826 at St. Johns, MB and buried by David T. Jones, chalain of H.B.C.

****************

More About Mary (Cree Indian) Mackogonne:
Burial: June 24, 1826, St John's, RRS
Christening: August 18, 1821, Norway House, Ruperts Land = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Sprague & Frye - Indian
Fact 2: MF pgs 357 as Mary Cree & 487 as Mary Muskegon
Fact 3: Birth & death dates from Gloria C Lester <gclester@juno.com> Aug 9, 1999
Fact 4: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000
Fact 5: shown as Mary Mackagonne by Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001, also see notes from Louis "Little Fidler"
Verhagen Database.
Fact 6: Mary was from the Home Guard Cree from Norway House, NWT = MB, CAN

Children of Peter Fidler and Mary Mackogonne are:

i. Thomas Fidler, born June 20, 1795 in Cumberland House, Rupert's Land; died March 07, 1875; married (1) Nancy or Elizabeth Hallett November 06, 1828 in St Johns, RRS; married (2) Jane Kipling November 09, 1831 in St Johns, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN.

Notes for Thomas Fidler:
Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database:

"Our research to-date indicates Thomas Fidler had eleven children, five born to his first wife Nancy dit Elizabeth Hallett and six born to his second wife, Jane Kipling. Baptismal records indicate that Jane Kipling is the mother of all but one of the children. Although Nancy Hallett was the natural mother of the first five children, Jane Kipling was the mother that raised all eleven children after Nancy's death in early 1831(?) and her marriage to Thomas in November of that year."

More About Thomas Fidler:
Burial: March 11, 1875, St Clements, Mapleton, MB, CAN
Christening: February 02, 1849, St Andrew's, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pges 357 and 485.
Fact 2: FMN ID# 1549 as Metis, Protestant, father is 1534, however this # is not listed
Fact 3: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002, see notes

More About Nancy or Elizabeth Hallett:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 485.
Fact 2: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Notes for Jane Kipling:
Jane Kipling, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Jane, wife of Thomas Fidler; born: 1815; father: John Kipling (Métis); mother: Indian; claim no.: 991; date of issue: July 30, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Jane Kipling:
Fact 1: FMN as Metis Protestant
Fact 2: see scrip info

40 ii. Charles Fidler, born October 10, 1798 in Cumberland House, Rupert's Land; died May 15, 1886 in St James, MB, CAN; married Anne Saunders October 25, 1825 in St Johns, RRS.

iii. George Fidler, born November 10, 1800 in Cumberland House, Rupert's Land; died July 1846 in St Francois Xavier,RRS; married Nancy Black January 21, 1834 in St Francois Xavier,RRS.

More About George Fidler:
Burial: July 02, 1846, St Francois Xavier, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Christening: January 20, 1834, St Francois Xavier, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999

Notes for Nancy Black:
Nancy Black, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler; Nancy Widow of George Fidler; born: 1810; father: John Black (Métis); mother: Marguerite Sauvagesse (Indian); claim no.: 1194; date of issue: Aug. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Nancy Black:
Baptised: January 20, 1834, St Francois Xavier, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF page 363.
Fact 2: see scrip info

iv. Sally Sarah Fidler, born November 26, 1802 in Nottingham House, Lake Athabaska, Fort Chipewyan, NWT + AB, CAN; died May 11, 1885 in St James, MB, CAN; married (1) William Williams; married (2) James Hallett November 06, 1828 in St John's, RRS.

Notes for Sally Sarah Fidler:
Sarah Sally Fidler, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1321 , Reel C-14928, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Hallett, Sarah, wife of James Hallett; born: 26
November 1802; father: Peter Fidler; mother: Mary Fidler (Cree Indian); claim no: 1647; scrip no: 10554; date of issue: 20 September1876; amount: $160 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Sally Sarah Fidler:
Christening: December 07, 1823, St John's, Red River Settlememt
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999
Fact 2: MF pg 487
Fact 3: see scrip info

More About William Williams:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
More About James Hallett:
Baptism: October 18, 1824, St John's, Red River Settlememt
Burial: St James, Manitoba, CAN
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999
Fact 2: MF pg 487

v. Decusroggan Fidler, born October 12, 1804 in Nottingham House, Lake Athabaska, NWT; died March 08, 1814 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land.

More About Decusroggan Fidler:
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999

vi. Andrew Fidler, born November 29, 1806 in Nottingham House, Lake Athabaska, NWT; died September 09, 1846 in RRS, NWT= MB, CAN; married Ann "Nancy" Hallett November 06, 1828 in Cumberland House, NWT.

More About Andrew Fidler:
Burial: St Johns, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Christening: October 30, 1825, St Johns, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 95, 367 and 487.
Fact 2: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About Ann "Nancy" Hallett:
Christening: October 18, 1924, St Johns, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 95 and 367.

vii. Alban Fidler, born June 17, 1809 in Holy Lake, Rupert's Land = MB, CAN; died November 09, 1879 in St James, MB, CAN; married Elizabeth Hallett November 06, 1828 in St Johns, RRS.

Notes for Alban Fidler:
Alban Fidler and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927, Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Alban; born: 1807; father: Peter Fidler (white); mother: Indian; claim no.: 1634; date of issue: September 20, 1876  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Alban Fidler:
Burial: November 1879, St James Cemetery, Winnipeg, MB, CAN
Christening: January 16, 1826, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 144, 368 and 789,
Fact 2: see scrip info

Notes for Elizabeth Hallett:
Elizabeth Hallet, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927 , Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Elizabeth, wife of Alban Fidler; born: 1814; father: Henry Hallett (English); mother: Catherine Dunger (Métis); claim no.: 1635; date of issue: Sept. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Elizabeth Hallett:
Baptised: October 18, 1824, St Johns, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 144, 368, 488 and 789. On page 486 she is d/o Henry and an Indian woman; page 488 as d/o Henry and Catherine
Fact 2: see scrip info

viii. Mary Fidler, born June 27, 1811 in Charlton Portage, NWT = MB, CAN; died October 17, 1862 in St John's, RRS; married John Foulds October 25, 1825 in St John's, RRS.

More About Mary Fidler:
Burial: October 17, 1842, St John's Church Cemetery, MB, CAN
Christening: August 12, 1821, Norway House, Ruperts Land = MB, CAN
Fact 1: #1623, Sprague & Frye, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research
Fact 3: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About John Foulds:
Fact 1: #1623, Sprague & Frye, Protestant
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research

ix. Faith Fidler, born August 26, 1813 in Slater's Island, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN; died October 06, 1813 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land.

More About Faith Fidler:
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999
Fact 2: Birth date from Gloria C Lester <gclester@juno.com>

x. Clement Fidler, born November 24, 1814 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land = MB, CAN; died January 16, 1870 in Headingly, MB, CAN; married Charlotte Slater February 06, 1834 in St John's, RRS.

More About Clement Fidler:
Burial: January 18, 1870, Headingly, MB, CAN
Christening: August 12, 1821, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 370 and 1104.

Notes for Charlotte Slater:
Charlotte Slater, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1320 , Reel C-14927 , Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Fidler, Charlotte Widow of Clement Fidler; born: 1805; father: James Slater (English); mother: Mary (Métis); claim no.: 1195; date of issue: Aug. 20, 1876 Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Charlotte Slater:
Baptised: December 27, 1827, St Johns, RRS
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research
Fact 2: see scrip info

xi. Colette (Polly) Fidler, born March 05, 1817 in Hallett's House, MB, CAN; died 1842 in MB, CAN; married George Irvine March 07, 1833 in St Johns, RRS.

More About Colette (Polly) Fidler:
Christening: August 12, 1821, Norway House, Ruperts Land = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999
Fact 2: FMN Id# 2390 opposite her husband
Fact 3: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About George Irvine:
Fact 1: FMN Id# 2390

xii. Marguerite Fidler, born June 18, 1819 in Red River Forks, Rupert's Land; died July 21, 1819 in Red River Forks, Rupert's Land.

More About Marguerite Fidler:
Fact 1: Furtrade Database - Stan Jan 1999
Fact 2: Death date from Gloria C Lester <gclester@juno.com>

xiii. Peter Fidler, born July 02, 1820 in Fort Dauphin, Swan River District, NWT = MB, CAN; died February 01, 1881 in St Paul, Middlechurch, MB, CAN; married Amelia Bird December 28, 1838 in St Johns, RRS.

Notes for Peter Fidler:
Peter is identified in MF pages 90, 91 and 370. He is also identified in MF(2001) Volume 1 pages 184, 188 and 192. According to the book "Hudson's Bay Company's Land Tenures" page 109, Peter was born at Norway House and was the eldest when his father made his will.

More About Peter Fidler:
Baptism: August 12, 1821, St John's, RRS, Stan Hulme
Christening: August 12, 1821, Norway House, Ruperts Land = MB, CAN - Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research
Fact 2: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Notes for Amelia Bird:
Amelia is identified in MF pages 90 and 91. She is also identified in MF(2001) Volume 1 pages 184, 192 and on 188 as follows: "Amelia Bird; born 4 Jan 1821 (MBS, C-14934); baptized 1 Aug 1824 St. Johns (AI-Rozyk); married Peter Fidler, son of Peter Fidler and Mary Mackegonne, 20 Dec 1838 St. Johns (Denney)."

More About Amelia Bird:
Baptised: August 01, 1824, St John's, RRS
Burial: April 11, 1893, St Paul, Middlechurch, MB, CAN
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research
Fact 2: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

xiv. Harriet Fidler, born July 09, 1822 in Dauphin, MB, CAN.

More About Harriet Fidler:
Fact 1: Birth date from Gloria C Lester <gclester@juno.com>
Fact 2: Mother more than 50 when Harriet born

82. John "Jack" (Sanderson) Saunders, born Abt. 1778; died 1831. He married 83. Isabel (Swampy Cree) Indian.

83. Isabel (Swampy Cree) Indian, born 1790 in Rupert's Land.

More About John "Jack" (Sanderson) Saunders:
Date born 2: 1797, NWT, CAN
Died 2: June 05, 1810
Fact 1 1: see daughter's scrip info
Fact 1 2: Paulette email Feb 21, 1999 as Sanders
Fact 2: Furtrade Database- Stan-Mar 4, 1999, MF pgs 798 and 1061
Fact 3: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Isabel (Swampy Cree) Indian:
Fact 1: see daughter's scrip info
Fact 2: Furtrade Database- Stan-Mar 4, 1999, MF pgs 798 and 1061
Fact 3: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

Children of John Saunders and Isabel Indian are:

i. Elizabeth (Sanderson) Saunders, born Abt. 1805; died December 10, 1847 in RRS, NWT = MB, CAN; married John Linklater February 04, 1830 in St John's, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN.

More About Elizabeth (Sanderson) Saunders:
Baptised: February 04, 1830, St John's, Red River Settlement
Burial: St Andrew's, RRS
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers
Fact 2: MF pg 691 to 693
Fact 3: FMN opposite her husband as Elizabeth Saunders

Notes for John Linklater:
John's is identified in FMN ID 2816 as protestant metis. The children listed in Genealogy of First Metis Nation for John and Helene Peebles may not be correct since she would have been over 50 when the first one was born and John was 57. John is also identified in MF pages 691 and 1061 as the husband of Elizabeth Sanderson and Eleanor (Helen) Peebles. He is also identified in his Manitoba Scrip application taken from Gail Morin's book "Manitoba Scrip" page 185 as follows:

"Linklater, John; HB Head: myself, wife and children; formerly of St Clements; now of Fort Alexander; b. 1805, NW; John Linklater (Scot) was father; (Indian) was mother; English; John Linklater; 6 Sep 1875; George Park. C-14930"

More About John Linklater:
Fact 1: Source T. C. McCloy Papers

ii. James (Saunders) Sanderson, born Aft. 1805; died 1826.

More About James (Saunders) Sanderson:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

iii. John (Saunders) Sanderson, born Aft. 1805.

More About John (Saunders) Sanderson:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

iv. Thomas (Saunders) Sanderson, born Aft. 1805.

More About Thomas (Saunders) Sanderson:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

v. Jane Margaret (Sanderson) Saunders, born Abt. 1810 in Lake Winnipeg, NWT; married John McNab December 18, 1827 in St John's, RRS.

More About Jane Margaret (Sanderson) Saunders:
Baptised: January 16, 1831, St John's, RRS
Fact 1: Bonnie's Database, Mar 1999
Fact 2: MF pgs 32-33 from Tekla email Mar 21, 1999
Fact 3: name shown as Saunders in Bonnies work
Fact 4: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 33, 798 and 1268

More About John McNab:
Baptised: January 16, 1831, St John's, RRS
Fact 1 1: Muriel Dobson email <scott@yknet.yk.ca> April 19, 1999
Fact 1 2: Bonnie's Database, Mar 1999
Fact 3: Stan's Sanderson file, Nov 22, 2000, MF pages 33, 798 and 1268

41 vi. Anne Saunders, born May 31, 1810 in NWT; died February 05, 1883 in St James, MB, CAN; married Charles Fidler October 25, 1825 in St Johns, RRS.

vii. David (Saunders) Sanderson, born Abt. 1806.

More About David (Saunders) Sanderson:
Baptised: May 07, 1824, St Johns, RRS, NWT = MB, CAN
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

viii. William (Sanderson) Saunders, born October 11, 1806; died Unknown; married (1) Margaret Cook; married (2) Mary Alder March 12, 1830 in St John's, RRS.

Notes for William (Sanderson) Saunders:
William Saunders and his parents are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1324 , Reel C-14933 , Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Saunders, William; born: 11 October 1806; father: David Saunders (English); mother: Mary Saunders (Indian); claim no: 302; scrip no: 2274 to 2281; date of issue: May 1, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About William (Sanderson) Saunders:
Baptism: March 12, 1830, St John's, RRS
Fact 1 1: see son's scrip info
Fact 1 2: Stan Hulme Research, MF pages 224, 233 and 1061
Fact 2 1: FMN ID#4229 as Metis
Fact 2 2: FMN ID #4319, Metis, Protestant
Fact 3: see scrip info

More About Margaret Cook:
Fact 1: Bonnies database, Dec 1998

Notes for Mary Alder:
Mary Alder, her parents and husband are identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-8-a , Volume 1324 , Reel C-14933 , Access code: 90
File Title: Scrip affidavit for Saunders, Mary; born: 1810; husband: William Saunders; father: Charles Alder (English); mother: Mary Alder (Métis); claim no: 303; scrip no: 2282 to 2289; date of issue: May 1, 1876; amount: $160  Finding Aid number: 15-19"

More About Mary Alder:
Fact 1: FMN opposite her husband #4319
Fact 2: Stan Hulme Research , MF pages 225, 233 and 1061
Fact 3: see scrip info

84. Jacques Lambert, born in St Michel, Yamaska, Que. He was the son of 168. Pierre Noel Lambert and 169. Catherine Hardy. He married 85. Marie Louis Danis November 06, 1775 in St Michel, Yamaska, PQ.

85. Marie Louis Danis. She was the daughter of 170. Gabriel Danis and 171. Catherine Allard.

More About Jacques Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Marie Louis Danis:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

Children of Jacques Lambert and Marie Danis are:

42 i. Etienne Lambert, born Bef. April 01, 1785 in St Michel, Yamaska, PQ; married (1) Betsy Honore dit Henry; married (2) Catherine Gaddy May 10, 1832 in St Boniface, Red River Settlement.

ii. Antoine Lambert, born Abt. 1793 in Quebec; married Marie Saulteaux May 09, 1832 in St Boniface, Red River Settlement.

More About Antoine Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Marie Saulteaux:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

86. James Gaddy. He married 87. Mary Muddy River Piegan.

87. Mary Muddy River Piegan.

More About James Gaddy:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Mary Muddy River Piegan:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

Child of James Gaddy and Mary Piegan is:

43 i. Catherine Gaddy, born October 31, 1799; married Etienne Lambert May 10, 1832 in St Boniface, Red River Settlement.

92. James Bremner, born in Wick, Caithness, Scotland. He married 93. Katherine Ogg.

93. Katherine Ogg, born in Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

More About James Bremner:
Fact 1: Wayne A Jones email Feb 23, 1999 <wjones@InterLinx.qc.ca>

More About Katherine Ogg:
Fact 1: Wayne A Jones email Feb 23, 1999 <wjones@InterLinx.qc.ca>

Child of James Bremner and Katherine Ogg is:

46 i. Alexander (Sr) Bremner, born 1791 in Caithness, Scotland; died August 28, 1842 in St Johns, Manitoba; married Elizabeth Twatt May 01, 1833 in St John's, Red River Settlement.

94. Magnus Twatt, born 1762. He married 95. Margaret.

95. Margaret, born 1767.

Notes for Magnus Twatt:
Subject: [Metisgen] Attention Bremner and Twatt Researchers & Family!
Date:  Tue, 27 Jun 2000 14:36:49 -0600
From: Paulette Boudreault-Gilbert <pbg@interbaun.com>
Reply-To: metisgen@genweb.net
Organization:  http://cw.interbaun.com/pbg
To:  metisgen@books.genweb.net

Send All email commands go to <mailto:listar@genweb.net>

Put the command In the subject line Or go to http://206.163.62.2/cgi-bin/lsg2

Magnus Twatt's will was found and sent to me?

Here's a short excerpt of what it is I just received! Letter first and shortly I'll have the will typed up as well?? :)

Quote:

I did, however, stumble across Magnus's will which I sent you a copy of. He left money for the parish of Orphir(where I lived for 9 years) to build a school and look after the poor. He visited Orkney in 1795/6 and left his will with a lawyer in Stromness. After he died in 1801 the school was built and completed in 1806. There was a part of the building used as a home for the poor. After the 1872 Scotland Education Act the local authorities built a parish school close by. A family then rented the house with money then going to the Twatt Mortification Trust. My(writer's) uncle best friend, who's family were quite poor, went to University in Edinburgh in the 1930's paid for by that fund. He was subsequently a head master in Caithness and died 2 years ago. He would have been one of many. The school and poor house were eventually sold to the family who rented it in 1924 with the money paid into the Trust.

"In 1934 the Twatt Mortification Trust became the Orkney Education Trust."

Today we went to take some photos of the school. It is a beautiful house. The lady who owns it says that in the 1970's, when she bought it, the schoolroom was in tact. The desks, etc went to the museum and a map of Hudson's Bay went back to Canada with a friend of hers. An envelope addressed to "The Keeper of the Poor", which she found behind a mantle piece, is in the archives.

>From the Archives and 1821 census I have found his sister living at Kirbister Farm in Kirbister, Orphir where Magnus specifically required his school to be built. I believe this is probably where he was born and brought up, his sister being the eldest daughter. She is not recorded as being a servant there. I must still get back to the archives and read the estate rentals for all those years which may throw more light on things. Next door(two hundred yards or so) Jean or Jane[here I've looked at the will to see the names mentioned..Ann Manson was his mother which he provided an annuity of ten pounds sterling per annum, during her natural life and after her 'Levase(don't know what this means, but suspect her death, funeral, burial as a last recorse re marriage?) , this annuity to devolve to his sisters, Ellen and Jean Twatt equally between them during their natural lives now back to the writer's letter] The census tells us she [Jeanne short form Jean?] was an elderly servant at the house of Moss. The house is well named, although the building is no longer to be seen. The ground next to the lock is very mossy. I have sent some bog cotton and heather from behind Kirbister and Moss. The school stands a few minute's walk from them slightly up a hill. All of this was in view, and five minutes walk, from my old home!

We have taken some photos and will take more of the area from the 'plane and send them to you. The old house of Kirbister(Cirbister as they used to call it) is now derelict. It would have been very small and dark with just a hole in the roof for the smoke to get out. Animals in one end and family in the other with a wall between. At a later date, probably early 1800's, the house has been extended and had two fireplaces with chimneys added. It is a beautiful spot near the sea, beside a little burn(river) next to the loch. A great place for trout and reasonable farm land. But at this time there was not enough land to support the population and rent had to be paid to the laird(or landowner). At that time it was part of the Honeyman Estate and many young men would have been encouraged to go to Hudson's Bay for a while at least. The laird on that estate was not too harsh, however. I will try to find more.

unquote:

================================================

Stan, Thank YOU once again for having referred a cousin of mine to me from overseas? it's wonderful to know one of ours actually did do something quite spectacular for others in the area of his home town?  Also, it is true Ann Manson was his mom...I've had that information for quite some time...now knowing she was in Scotland, will let the overseas cousin come find me from the Manson lineages..:))

Thought I'd share this with all of you....there is gold in them there messages...one just has to continue to keep the faith, and hope to live long enough to see it's beauty?

Am Thankful another relative did not take the high road but used the common man's way of sharing and caring and indeed did end up making a huge difference? Wonderful! in fact knowing his estate was carried out as it was he wanted...took care of his mom and sisters, while also making sure his family here were healthy, fed and clothe, none of us are born with these systems attached to us, nor do any of God's children come with pockets filled with earthly funds, hmmm? Who says we've not done good here as well as there, hmmm? <Big Big Smile today!> He lives through education, hmmm! Incredible! Fantastic! What a way to achieve immortality.....do unto others as you would have done unto yourself!

GGrand father Bremner ended up at University through his struggle of his live long story!

How come this is not common knowledge everywhere's throughout the world? Must be some are misunderstanding what life and learning are still all about, hmmm? Reading, wRiting and aRithmatic, the three R's of any good education, hmmmm? :)

Descendant of some mighty gReat minds and thinkeRs! With a huge big grin....still have to find the last R in order to be one with them all yet...back to work for me here..sure hope you've enjoyed reading the above as I have had receiving and sitting, typing it all out for you to share with me here?

Whoppie! as I do a jig around my chair here! C'est la Vie! say the old folk, when you least expect, you do get? :)

Yours Forever within the Cousintrees!

Paulette

--

More About Magnus Twatt:
Fact 1: #4729- Sprague & Frye
Fact 2: see stories in notebook

More About Margaret:
Fact 1: Sprague & Frye - Metis

Child of Magnus Twatt and Margaret is:

47 i. Elizabeth Twatt, born Abt. 1790 in Headingly, Manitoba, Canada; died May 13, 1885 in Bresaylor, NWT=Sk, Canada; married Alexander (Sr) Bremner May 01, 1833 in St John's, Red River Settlement.

Generation No. 8

128. Donald William McKay, born 1733 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT; died in Fort Albany area. He was the son of 256. Unknown McKay.

More About Donald William McKay:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000
Fact 2: worked with NWC at Montreal and possibly joined HBC with his brother John

Child of Donald William McKay is:

64 i. Donald 'Mad' McKay, born Abt. 1753 in Clyne, Sutherlandshire Parish, Scotland; died June 26, 1833; married (1) Elspeth Kennedy; married (2) Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland Abt. 1809 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT.

130. James Sutherland. He married 131. Mary McKenzie.

131. Mary McKenzie.

More About James Sutherland:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000
Fact 3: Eileen refers to him as Chief Factor

More About Mary McKenzie:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'

Child of James Sutherland and Mary McKenzie is:

65 i. Margaret Elizabeth Sutherland, died in Nova Scotia, CAN; married Donald 'Mad' McKay Abt. 1809 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT.

136. John McNab McKay, born 1731 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT; died Abt. 1791 in Albany Factory, Rupert's Land. He was the son of 272. Unknown McKay. He married 137. Unknown.

137. Unknown.

More About John McNab McKay:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

More About Unknown:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

Children of John McKay and Unknown are:

68 i. John R McKay, born 1753 in Clyne, Sutherlandshire, Scotland; died July 05, 1810 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land; married Mary Favell Abt. 1791 in Manitoba, Canada.

ii. Alexander McKay, born Abt. 1771 in Glengarry County, Upper Canada; died June 15, 1811 in Tonquin Massacre, Vancouver Island; married Marguertie Wadin.

Notes for Alexander McKay:
Excerpt 'Out from Hudson's Bay-The McKays by Stanely Hulme, rec'd by post Nov, 1998

In 1963 edition of the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, page 460, has the following synopsis: "fur-trader, was the son of Donald McKay and Elspeth Kennedy, United Empire Loyalist who settled in the township of Charlottenburg, Glengarry county, Upper Canada. He entered the service of the North West Company before 1791, and accompanied Sir Alexander Mackenzie on his overland journey to the Pacific ocean in 1793.

He was at Portage la Prairie in 1794-95, and he was made a partner of the North West Company in 1799. He was in charge at Lake Winnipeg in 1799, and again in 1806; and he retired from the Company in 1808. In 1807 he was elected a member of the Beaver club of Montreal. In 1810 he became a partner in the Pacific Fur Company of J.J. Astor (qv) and sailed to Astoria with Gabriel Franchere (qv). He was murdered by the Indian on the Tonquin, near Nootka, in the summer of 1881. He married a half breed by whom he had a least on son, Thomas (qv); and his wife afterwards married Dr. John McLoughlin (qv). His sister Catherine married in 1804, Simon Fraser (qv), of Ste. Anne's, Bout de L'Isle. [W.S.Wallace (ed). Documents relating to the North West Company (Toronto: The Champlain Society, 1934)]"

As aluded to in the above synopsis Alexander McKay was Alexander MacKenzie's assistant on his epochal trip to the Pacific in May 1793. He spent the winter of 1792-3 with MacKenzie at the Forks of Peace River. (Journals, page 482) At this time he was twenty-two, about eight years younger than Macdenzie. The book "First Across the Continent' page 122 states that Alexander 'was a Loyalist who hailed for the Mohawk Valley and Glengarry County, Upper Canada'. He 'was a natural born scout, a daring woodsman and tireless canoeist.'

In 1809 he and Donald McKenzie was enticed to join John Jacob Astor in his American Fur Company which Astor had organized in 1808. (Mountain Men Vol Vl page 186) On June 23, 1810 formal documents were drawn up in New York to create the Pacific Fur Company with Astor holding 50 of the 100 shares and Alexander McKay, Donald McKenzie, Duncan McDougal, David Stuart, Wilson Price Hunt and Crooks each having 5 shares. Robert McLean and Joseph Miller each had 2 1/2 shares with 15 shares in reserve.

On July 5, 1810 Alexander, Donald McKenzie and Wilson Price Hunt led an exedition of voyageurs from Lachine to Mackinac where they arrived on July 17th; from their they went to Praire du Chien, then down the Mississippi to St Louis where they would begin the long journey to the mouth of the Columbia. (Mountain Men Vol Vl page 327) (see Kenneth Wiggins Porter's, John Jacob Astor, Business Man, 2 Vols [New York 1931; 1966 reprint] 1, pp 183-4) Editor's note: this information must be confirmed since there are two references that appear to place Alexander at two locations at about the same time ie: taking the overland trek and sailing from New York on the Tonquin.

An expedition to the Pacific was organized aboard the 'Tonquin', a 269 ton ship built in New York in1807 and purchased by Astor on August 23, 1810. She sailed from New York on September 6 or 8, 1810 (Sep 8, according to Mountain Men, Vol Vl pg 189; Sep 6 according to The Canadian Encyclopedia pag 1829), bound for the Columbia River where Astor's Pacific Fur Company intended to found a post and develop trade in opposition to the North West Company.

The ship arrived at the Columbia River mouth on March 22, 1811 where eight sailors apparently drowned trying to take soundings. On June 5th the Tonquin sailed on a trading cruise from the new fort of Astoria. About Jun 15th, near Echatchet village, Templar Channel, Clayoquot Sound, Vancouver Island, she was blown up, possibly by her captain Jonathon Thorn, to prevent her from falling into the hands of local Indians, who were attaching the ship. The crew and passengers, including Alexander McKay were killed by the Nootka Indians.

The Victoria Times Colonist printed the following article, written by Lindsay Smyth, concerning the Tonquin on Sunday, April 20, 1997. 'Of all the maritime tragedies whose dark stories form a prominent chapter in the history of the British Columia coast, the loss of the Tonquin at Clayoquot Sound in 1811 stands out above the rest as a most compelling affair. A 94 foot long copper bottomed barque of 286 tones burden, the Tonquin was owned by John Jacob Astor, a prominent New York merchant who aspired to dominate the lucrative fur trade of the Northwest Coast through the agency of his newly formed Pacific Fur Company. By all accounts the vessel's master Capt Jonathan Thorn, was a cruel and obstinate tyrant, completely devoid of that soundness of judgement so essential to a man of his postition. A lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, the 32 year old New York native had been granted two years' leave of absence to serve in the vanguard of Astor's drive to the Pacific.

Upon their arrival at the village of Echachis in the latter part of June, Thorn promptly offended a chief named Wookamis in a dispute over the exchange rate the latter demanded on behalf of the Clayoquot tribe. When the aged chief began to jeer and banter the cpatain over the mean prices he offered, Thorn seized a sea otter pelt out of his hands and rubbed it in his face, then kicked him overboard. Wookamis left the ship in a wild rage, uttering terrible threats, while his astonished tribesmen swiftly gathered up their furs and followed him ashore.

The incident was deeply deplored by the ship's surpercargo, Alexander McKay, who had spent the previous night ashore at the invitation  of Chief Wicananish, attempting to establish friendly trading relations on behalf of the new fur company. Immediately upon learning what had transpired, McKay returned to the ship and urged Thorn to weigh anchor and sail away, as he was certain from his long experience as an Indian trader that an attempt would be made to avenge the grievous insult to the chief. But the Scottish-Canadian McKay was despised by the American skipper, who hated all things British. Accusing the supercargo of cowardice, Thorn ridiculed his advice.

That night the captain retired as usual without even implementing the most basic precautions exerised by other maritime traders, such as rigging boarding nets or instructing the watch not to permit more than a small number of natives to come aboard at any given time. That same night, in the council house of the Clayoquots, there were long harangues and wild songs, and fierce dances. Bodies were painted black with the sombre coloring of war. At daybreak on the following morning, while Thorn and McKay were still asleep in the berths, a large canoe manned by a score of natives approached the ship. Affecting a most affable disposition, the men held bales of fur high over their heads, indicative of their desire to trade.

As no order to the contrary had been given out, the officer of the watch permitted them to come on board and commence battering, little suspecting that some of their bundles of fur concealed war clubs. Shortly thereafter, another great war canoe came alongside, equally laden with choice furs calculated to excite the white man's cupidity, and before long the Tonquin's decks were swarming with Indians. At length, perceiving an armada of small canoes coming off from the village, the watch took alarm and called for the captain and supercargo. The moment they came on deck, McKay again advised the captain to clear the ship and get under way, but the latter, still regarding his fears with contempt, ordered the trade to be continued.

On this occasion the Indians showed none of their usual bickering about prices, amicably agreeing to let the white place any value they pleased on their furs. So far as possible without exciting suspicion, they traded for knives, and as one rapid exchange succeeded the next, they would move away and make a pretence of dropping their purchases into their canoes, meanwhile concealing the knives about their persons.

By degrees, they distributed themselves about the ship until finally there were two or more warriors covering every seaman, when their formerly pleasant aspect have way to one of scowling displeasure and menace. Meanwhile the ship was surrounded by an ever increasing number of canoes, and more warriors were crowding about every moment. Alarmed at the fact that the women remained in the canoes - a sure sign of hostile intent - the chief mate informed the captain, who at last became suspicious and was motivaed to act with singular fatuity.

Without first clearing the ship, he directed some of the crew to man the capstan and weigh anchor, while others where ordered aloft to unfurl the sails. Finally he informed the natives that the ship was about to get underway, and brusquely commanded them to retire. A moment later a terrific din of bloodcurdling war-cries resounded throughout the ship as half a hundred warriors drew forth their concealed weapons and fell upon the astonished crew. The sailors fought desparately with jack-knives, handspikes and belaying-pins, laying about them iwth the energy of iespair, but were soon overwhelmed by numbers.

With the exception of half a dozen or so who remained aloft in the rigging, they were annihilated in minutes. When the attack commenced, McKay had been sitting on the taffrail at the stern of the ship, where the trade had been conducted. Rising to his feet he drew forth a pistol and shot one Indian dead, almost at the same moment he received a stunning blow from a war club that knocked him backwards into the sea where a howling mob of women dispatched him with their deadly pointed paddles.

With nothing but a clasp knife to defend himself, Capt Thorn killed several Indians, including the chief who led the assualt, while making a desperate attempt to slash his way from the quarter-deck to his cabin below, where the firearms were stored. He had nearly accomplished his goal when he was stabbed from behind and fell dead on the spot. Meanwhile - after being left for dead - the ship's clerk, James Lewis, recovered his senses and in the confusion of the moment managed to gain possession of the officer's cabin. He armed himself wtih pistols, mounted a table beneath the open skylight, and commenced a brisk fire which soon drove the Indians from the quarter-deck. A few minutes later Lewis was joined by a sailor who dropped a line from the mizzen-top and descended through the skylight. This act encouraged his shipmates in the main and foretop, who raced to let themselves down through the main hatch. Before the Indians could recover from their amazement, three other sailors slipped down the tackle and vanished into the hold, leaving the remainder to perish in the attempt.

Making their way aft between decks, they swiftly gained the shelter of he cabin, seized arms and began firing through the skylight and companionways at the Indians on the main deck. The latter retreated to their canoes and made for shore, when the white men sallied forth and unleashed a fearful cannonade from the deck guns, inflicting terrible slaughter.

Finding themselves once again in possession of the ship, the five remaining seamen took hurried council. As the wind was now setting into the bay, they couldn't sail away. Consequently, it was determined to wait until nightfall, when they might slip away in the ship's boat and endeavour to return to the Columbia Rive, where the Tonquin had disembarked a part of colonists.

Prior to their departure, however, Lewis resolved to stay and go down with colours flying, rather than risk capture by the Clayoquots. After  bidding the others a solemn adieu, he set about laying a train of powder to the magazine where several tons of gunpowder were in storage. With the return of morning came the return of the Indians. They approached cautiously at first, observing the apparently desertied vessel as she rode quietly at anchor, her sails all loose and flapping in the wind. Presently the wounded clerk appeared at the railing, and making the signs that he was all alone, and beckoning the warriors to come aboard. When at last a few men mounted the deck, they were surprised to meet with no opposition, for Lewis had disappeared.

Other canoes now pressed forward to board the prize, until nearly the whole tribe was assembled. By hundreds, men clambered up the sides and began throwing bales of goods from the deck, while the women and children remained in the canoes gathered them up. Suddenly came the sound of a single shot as Lewis fired the train with a flint lock, followed a moment later by a tremendous explosion. There was a blinding flash as the whole topworks of the ship blew off and a cloud of pure white smoke ascended to the heavens, while legs, arms and mangled bodies were thrown hundreds of feet in the air, to rain down mutilated fragments of humanity over a half-mile radius. Somewhere between 100 and 200 Indians are said to have died in the consequence of this terrible act of revenge, besides a vast number burned, wounded and maimed for life. Determined to vert their rage on the four seamens who had obviously put our in the ship's boat, the Clayoquots sent men in pursuit. They soon discovered the boat's crew in a nearby cove, where they had hoped to remain concealed until a more favourable wind permitted them to run out to sea. They were taken back to the village and subjected to the most cruel and lingering tortures the infuriated natives could devise.

Sometime afterwards, the ship's mixed blook interpreter, a native of Gray's Harbour, called Lamayzie, appeared at Astoria claiming that the Clayoquots had spared his life because they regarded him as neutral. Over the course of the next 40 years Lamayzie entertained mariners with imaginative accounts of the Tonquin tragedy, reshaping and embellishing his tale to such an extent that it is now scarcely possible to separate fact from fiction.

Consequently it must be remarked that this or any other narrative pertaining to the subject is largely open to the individual's interpretation of he evidence. The true story of what actually occured at Clayoqot Sound on that fateful day in the summer of 1811 must evermore remain one of the most perlpexing enigmas in the history of the Northwest.'

More About Alexander McKay:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'

More About Marguertie Wadin:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: identified in 'Strangers in the Blood' pg 157

iii. Catherine McKay, born Aft. 1771 in St Anne's, Quebec; died 1846 in St Anne's, Quebec; married Simon Fraser 1804.

More About Catherine McKay:
Burial: Family Cemetary at Ste Anne's (near Montreal), Quebec
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: identified in 'Pedlars from Quebec' pages 46-52.

More About Simon Fraser:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: identified in 'Pedlars from Quebec' pages 46-52.
Fact 3: as there were several simon Frasers associated with the fur trade, he is known as Simon Fraser of Ste Anne's.
Fact 4: May 13, 1839, obituary appeared in the Quebec Gazette
Fact 5: Bef. 1789, was in English River country

iv. Christy McKay, born Aft. 1771; married Peter McArthur.

More About Christy McKay:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'

More About Peter McArthur:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: according to MF pg 768, he was from King's Road, Ontario

v. Isabelle McKay, born Aft. 1771; married Adam McDonald.

Notes for Isabelle McKay:
Isabelle is identified in the Winter 1954 Beaver as Isabella. Her date of birth could have been before 1771 since she apparently had five sons and her son Donald was born in Brora, in northern Scotland.

More About Isabelle McKay:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: see notes

Notes for Adam McDonald:
Adam is identified in the Winter 1954 edition of The Beaver, page 20. His name is spelled MacDonald in the story 'Big Donald of the Blackfeet.' He apparently had three sons who were killed or wounded at Corunna and Waterloo and one who emigrated to Nova Scotia.

More About Adam McDonald:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: see notes

vi. William McKay, born 1772 in Mohawk Valley, New York, USA; died August 18, 1832 in Montreal, Quebec; married (1) Josette Latour Bef. 1808; married (2) Elizabeth (Eliza) Davidson October 15, 1808.

Notes for William McKay:
Stan Hulme, 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
William is also identified in the 1963 edition of The Dictionary of Canadian Biography, page 463 as follows: "fur-trader and soldier, was born in 1772, the son of Donald McKay and Elspeth Kennedy, and brother of Alexander McKay (qv). He entered the service of the North West Company in 1790, and was a partner in 1796. He was in charge at Lake Winnipeg in 1799, and in 1805 was at Portage la Prairie.

He retired for the fur-trade in 1807, and was elected a member of the Beaver Club of Montreal. In the war of 1812 he commanded the British force which captured Prairiedu-Chen; and after the war he became an officer of the Indian department, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. he died in Montreal in 1832.

In 1808 he married Eliza, daughter of the Hon. Mr. Justice Davidson; and by her he had a son, Robert, who became a judge of the Supreme Court of Quebec. McKay street, in Montreal is named after him."

[W.S. Wallace (ed)]

Documents relating to the North West Company (Toronto: The Champlain Society, 1934); R. Campbell, A History of the Scotch Presbyterian church, St Gabriel Street, Montreal (Montreal, 1893.)] William is extensively discussed in his biography on Volume VI of the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, pages 464 to 466.

More About William McKay:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme - 'Out from the Bay'
Fact 2: MF page 768
Fact 3: see notes

Notes for Josette Latour:
Josette is identified in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Volume VI, page 465. According to this reference she married William, according to the customs of the country, sometime between 1796 and 1807. After William retired she became the 'country wife' of John Haldane.

More About Josette Latour:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998
Fact 2: see notes

More About Elizabeth (Eliza) Davidson:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme 'Out from Hudson's Bay' Dec, 1998

138. John Humphrey (Jr) Favell, born Abt. 1740 in Southwark, London, England; died November 02, 1784 in Henley House, Albany District, Rupert's Land. He was the son of 276. John Sr. Favell and 277. Jane Unknown. He married 139. Titameg Abt. 1770 in Rupert's Land = NWT = MB, CAN.

139. Titameg, born Abt. 1750 in Swampy Cree Indian Settlement, York Factory, Rupert's Land; died Aft. 1825 in Brandon House, Rupert's Land.

Notes for John Humphrey (Jr) Favell:
Received by Stan from HBC Archives, printout dated Feb, 1998
John Favell, Fr entered HBC service in 1754 and served in the following capacities:

Outfit year Position Post District
Reference
1754-1960 Writer Albany A.16/3
fo.96; 3/d/63-68
1760-1761 Writer Moose Factory B.135/d/30
1761-1769 2nd Accountant Moose Factory
A.6/10,11;B.135/a/34-46;b.135/c/1
1769-1770 on leave A.6/11
1770-1774 Second Albany A.16/4 fo.83, 126; A.30/1
fo 2; A.6/11
(in command)
1774-1779 Second Albany A.16/4
fo.126; A.30/1 fo.14, 26,39, 52, 69
Master Henley House Albany
B.86/a/21-34
1779-1784 Deputy Albany Albany
A16/4 fo 126; A.16/5 fo.25.A.30/2,fo 2, 20,39; A.6/3; A.4/2
1784, Nov 2, Died at Albany A.16/5 fo
81; B.3/a/84; 135/b/16; a.44/1p.86
1775-" Greatly chargrined to find that after 20 years of service, he was superceded in command..."

A.30/1fo.14

Stan Hulme Research

In a letter written by Edward Jarvis to John Thomas, Chief at Moose Fort, on Dec 15, 1784, John Favell's death is described. "Poor Mr. Favell departed this life on 2nd November without scarce any previous sickness - he was seized with a fit the lst to which he had been much accustomed of late years and a repetition of it on the 2nd as he was going out, carried him off in less than one minute, he little expected his dissolution being anxious for Tenting out, for which he was preparing.' (Moose Fort Journals 1783-85, page 253)

"John Favell Junior" His Will

I John Favell Junior second factor of Albany Fort being infirm in body, but in perfect health of mind do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in fomr following that is to say I give and recommend my soul into the hands of Almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the Earth to be interred at the discretion of my Executor and touching such earthly estates which it has pleased God to bless me with I will and bequeath in the following manner and form ----------

I bequeath to my Honored Father Mr. John Favell, slop seller, Tooley Street in the Borough of Southworth the sum of one hundred pounds sterling. Also to Nelly Pearson late servant to my above said Honored Father, the sum of four hundred pounds sterling to her or in case of her death to her Son's Executors or Assigns. Then I bequeath to Mr. John Kipling Master of Gloucester House my feather bed.

Also to Mr. John Best builder of Henley House my looking glass liquor case and hanger and will that the remainder of my effects be sold by public auction the money arising from the said to be applied in purchasing goods from the Company's warehouse for the immediate maintenance of my four natural children Jane Favell now at Moose Fort Humphrey Martin Favell now with Mary and Thomas and their mother commonly called Tittameg share and share alike.

Then I bequeath to Mr. Thomas Hutchins late chief of Albany Fort the sum of three hundred pounds sterling on consideration he pays the undermentioned annuities into the Honorable Hudson Bay Company's hands during the lives of the said annuitants. Viz: four pounds sterling per annum during the life of Humphrey Martin Favell four pounds sterling per annum during the life of Thomas Favell two pounds ten shillings per annum during the life of Jane Favell two pounds ten shillings per annum during the life of Mary Favell and two pounds ten shillings during the life of their mother the said annuities to commence one year after my decease and _____ Annuity to ________ and _______ with the lives of the respective persons above mentioned upon the chief of Albany Fort for the ______ being certifying to the said Company the death of the said.

Annuitants the above sums of money to be applied in purchasing from the Company's warehouse such articles as may be necessary to their support at the discretion of the Chief and I request the Honorable Company will permit this part of my Will to be put in execution.

Now I bequeath to my Honored Aunts Mrs. Hannah Bun and Elizabeth Bun the sum of forty pounds sterling each and to each of their Daughters the sum of twenty pounds sterling. Also to my worthy friend Mr. Humphrey Martin the sum of fifty pounds sterling or in case of his decease to his son John Aurira Martin. Also to Mr. Edward Jarvis Chief of Albany Fort the sum of forty pounds sterling.

Also to Benjamin Whayman in consideration of his long service, age and misfortune with the sume of forty pounds sterling. Also to Mr, Robert Goodwin Surgeon the sum of ten guineas sterling. Also to George Sutherland the sum of five guineas sterling. Also to Mr. John McNab the sum of three guineas.

Now I bequeath the remaining sums of money that may be in my father John Favell and the Hudson Bay Company's lands to my brother Samuel Favell and it is my Will in case of the death of any of the said legecies their respective legacies to revert to my brother Samuel Favell excepting those respective of Nellie Parson Mr. Thomas Hutchins and Mr. Humphrey Martin.

And I hereby appoint Mr. Thomas Hutchins aforesaid late Chief of Albany Fort the sole Executor of this my last will and Testament revoking all others heretofore made by me. And it my desire that the aforesaid legacies and bequests be discharged in twelve months or as soon as possible after my decease.

In witness wherefore I have hereunto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand sevehundred and eighty four. John Favell.

Signed Sealed published and pronounced by the said John Favell as his Last Will and Testament in the presence of us in his presence and the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names. of mind and appoint Thomas Phillips Matther and William Cooper

Will was proved at London the eighth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty five before the Worshipful William _____Doctor of Laws Surrogate of the right Worshipful Peter Calvert also Doctor of Laws Master Keeper or commissary of the ___ Court of Canterbury lawfully constituted by the Oath of Thomas Hutchins Esquire sole Executor named in the said Will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods chattell and credits of the deceased let leaving being first sworn duly to administer."

Margaret Clarke Research- Canada Tree Newsletter

"In answer to my article and query on the Favells, Eleanor Anderson sent in the following article."

John Favell, Jr

"John Favell Jr was probably about 18 0r 20 when he came out. He worked at Moose Factory for about 8 years, learning all about the fur trade. In 1862 he was experienced enough to be appointed Chief Factor at Fort Albany. He worked there for several years and in 1869 he returned to England to visit with his family. The following year he returned as second factor at Fort Albany. A couple of times he was sent inland on the Albany River, about a hundred miles, where they established Fort Henley. This was an attempt to compete with the North West Company who were moving inland over the Great Lakes system and through the Winnipeg River system to the Prairies. Up until that time, the HBC had sat in their forts on the Bay and let the Indians come to them with their furs.

During this time he married a Cree Indian woman named Titameg (which Raymond Buarmont tells me means "Whitefish".ed). He had four children with her, two boys, Humphrey and Thomas and two girls, Jane and Mary. Mary married John McKay and they had many children and many descendants.

Nothing has been traced about Jane. Perhaps she died young. Humphrey married an Indian girl named Jenny, and Thomas married a native girl named Sally Trout."

More About John Humphrey (Jr) Favell:
Fact 1: info from HBC Co records of John Favel
Fact 2: from Stan's Sinclair database, Nov, 1998
Fact 3: Gail Morin MF page 350
Fact 4: in 'Beyond the Gates of Lower Fort Garry' page 272
Fact 5: European
Fact 6: middle name Humphrey from Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

Notes for Titameg:
from Stan -'Titameg is identified as Cree Indian'

Will of John Favell Junior- leaves money for Titameg and his children Margaret back again. I found the will, filed with the rest of my HBC employees records. I believe I copied it from the Glenbow archives, but the reference number is faded out. So here goes: See Notes for John Favel to read text of Will York Factory Indian Band, 1998

YORK FACTORY INDIAN BAND

The York Factory Indian Band is located on the Aiken River at the southern part of Split Lake about 106 air km from Thompson and covers 2390 acres. Since band lands and activities are affected by the Lake Winnipeg Regulation and the Churchill River Diversion, they are party to the Northern Flood Agreement. The band is signatory to the 1910 adhesion to Treaty 5 and its people speak the Cree language. The  reserve is home to 292 aboriginal people with another 384 living off the reserve and is accessible by winter road, air and water. The community obtains water from the Aiken River and utilizes pit privies and septic fields for sewage disposal. The band has limited fire protection and employs one band constable receiving assistance from the RCMP detachment in Thompson. Some health care is provided on the reserve with the nearest hospital being located in Thompson. On-reserve facilities include a band office, a community hall, and recreation facilities. Economic activities include trapping, hunting, air service, stores, a gas bar, and a camp.

More About Titameg:
Fact 1: info from HBC Co records of John Favel b 1740, Southwark, Eng

Children of John Favell and Titameg are:

i. Jane Favell, born Abt. 1770; died Unknown; married John Richards.

More About Jane Favell:
Fact 1: info from HBC Co records of father John b about 1740, Southwark, Eng
Fact 2: Birth date from John Hunter Data Base
Fact 3: Metis

More About John Richards:
Fact 1: from Paulette- this is not for sure/fact?

ii. Humphrey Martin Favell, born 1771 in Rupert's Land = NWT = MB, CAN; died March 10, 1810 in Brandon House; married Jenny Indian in Rupert's Land = NWT = MB, CAN.

More About Humphrey Martin Favell:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research
Fact 2: see daughter Marie's scrip info

More About Jenny Indian:
Fact 1: see daughter Marie's scrip info

69 iii. Mary Favell, born Abt. 1775 in Henley House, Rupert's Land; died March 19, 1810 in Brandon House, NWT; married John R McKay Abt. 1791 in Manitoba, Canada.

iv. Thomas Favell, born 1779 in Ruperts Land; died August 12, 1848 in St. Andrews, RRS=MB, CAN; married Sarah (Indian Woman) Trout January 21, 1821 in St. Johns, Beaver Creek, NWT = MB, CAN.

Notes for Thomas Favell:
Thomas Favell is identified in the National Archives of Canada Scrip records as follows: "Reference: RG15 , Interior , Series D-II-3 , Volume 182 , Reel T-12025 File : HB 1605 , Access code: 90
File Title: That they hold Power of Attorney from Thomas Favel, St. Andrews to draw Scrip to which he is entitled, ask when it will issue. Names: Haggart, Wilkes & Ross Favel, Thomas  Finding Aid number: 15-17"

*******************

From Gordon Favelle, Winnipeg, Manitoba, December, 1998, received photocopy of Hudson's Bay Company Archives, their stamp in lower right corner

_______________________________________________________

Name: Favel (Favell), Thomas Parish: Rupert's Land Entered Service

1793 Dates: 1780-1848+

_____________________________________________________________________

Appointments & Service

Outfit Year* Postition Post District HBCA Reference

*an Outfit year ran from June 1 to May 31

____________________________________________________________________

1793-1798 (Labourer) Albany A.32/8 fo. 1
1798-1800 (Labourer) (Albany) A.30/10
1800-1801 Labourer Albany A.30/10
1801-1805 (Labourer) (inland?) (Albany) A.30/10, B.3/d/117
1805-1810 Labourer Inland Red River B.3/d/117, 119, 12, 125
1810-1812 Labourer Winnipeg A.30/11, B.3/d/127
1812-1814 Steersman Winnipeg A.30/12,13
1814-1816 Steersman Brandon Winnipeg A.30/14, 15
House(RR)
1816, June 1 Free A.30/15
1821-1822 Steersman Beaver Creek A.32/28
1822 Freeman Upper Red River B.239/g/1
Wife: Sally, a Cree Indian Woman ( m. 29 January 1821) PAM, St.
John's Marriages
Children: John, Thomas, Richard, Sally, Samuel, Humphrey PAM, St.
John's Baptisms
(all baptised Jan 29, 1821, along with their parents) Mary 1813-1828, #'s 64-71, 393,
(baptised Aug 3, 1826) Joseph (bap. Jan 20, 1829) 591; 1828-1879, #'s 48, 274
William (bap. June 14, 1831)
+buried August 28, 1848 PAM, St. Andrew's Burials,
1835-1870, #292

Biography may be subject to revision if more information becomes available

More About Thomas Favell:
Baptised: January 28, 1821, St John's, RRS as an adult
Fact 1: 1781, birth info from 1831 Census says about 1777
Fact 2: August 28, 1848, buried at St. John's Cemetary, Manitoba, Canada
Fact 3: 4th g Grandfather to Serena Lee Mcdonnell
Fact 4: info from family search of HBC & Church archives
Fact 5: Sprague & Frye, 1520, Metis, P
Fact 6: MF pgs 25, 350, 621
Fact 7: see scrip info
Fact 8: in 'Beyond the Gates' page 273

More About Sarah (Indian Woman) Trout:
Baptism: January 28, 1821, St Andrew's, Red River Settlement
Burial: St Andrew's, Red River Settlement
Fact 1: 1870, RRS Census notes Sally Trout as 90 years old
Fact 2: Canada Tree on-line shows Sally as Sarah
Fact 3: Sprague & Frye, 1520, Indian, P as Sally
Fact 4: MF pages 25 & 350

Marriage Notes for Thomas Favell and Sarah Trout:
Married by J. West, info from Shirley Kalk Collection, Buffalo Narrows, Manitoba

160. James Fidler, born 1734 in Duckmanton, Derby, England; died May 16, 1809 in Sutton, Scarsdale, Derby, England. He was the son of 320. Samuel Fidler and 321. Sarah Oldfield. He married 161. Mary Glossup May 13, 1768 in Duckmanton, Derby, England.

161. Mary Glossup, born March 25, 1747 in Duckmanton, Derby, England; died Abt. 1827 in Bolsover, Derby, England. She was the daughter of 322. Peter Glossup and 323. Sarah Heath.

Notes for James Fidler:
Subject: Re: Peter Fidler b 1769

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 22:53:16 -0700
From: Stan Hulme <nanitort@netcom.ca>
To: Serena Willis <serena@yt.sympatico.ca>
CC: Metis Genealogy <metisgen@listserv.northwest.com>

Hi Serena

Peter's parents, James and Mary Glossup are identified in Gail's Metis Families page 357. They are not specifically identified by name in the book 'Peter Fidler, Canada's Forgotten Explorer 1769-1822', however this ref does identify that he had a brother named James.

Take care and enjoy Stan

*********

Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Research:

Source for death and burial, Memorial Inscriptions as recorded on micro fiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society. Age at death given as 75 years.

**********

More About James Fidler:
Burial: May 1809, Church Cemetery, Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: assume he was not born in Rupert's Land
Fact 2: MF- see notes
Fact 3: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Mary Glossup:
Fact 1: assume she was not born in Rupert's Land
Fact 2: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

Children of James Fidler and Mary Glossup are:

80 i. Peter Fidler, born August 16, 1769 in Sutton Mills, Bolsover, Derbyshire, England; died December 17, 1822 in Fort Dauphin, NWT = MB, CAN; married Mary (Cree Indian) Mackogonne Abt. October 1794 in York Factory, Rupert's Land.

ii. Sarah Fidler, born August 02, 1772 in Derbyshire, England; died Abt. 1810 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England; married Joseph Bee April 07, 1802 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.

More About Sarah Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About Joseph Bee:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

iii. James Fidler, born April 11, 1774 in Duckmanton, Derbyshire, England; died Abt. 1846 in Duckmanton, Derbyshire, England; married Hannah Beardsmore December 21, 1802 in Staveley, Derbyshire, England.

More About James Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Source: His will, IGI, Mary Fidler Bolsover

More About Hannah Beardsmore:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

168. Pierre Noel Lambert. He married 169. Catherine Hardy.

169. Catherine Hardy.

More About Pierre Noel Lambert:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Catherine Hardy:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

Child of Pierre Lambert and Catherine Hardy is:

84 i. Jacques Lambert, born in St Michel, Yamaska, Que; married Marie Louis Danis November 06, 1775 in St Michel, Yamaska, PQ.

170. Gabriel Danis. He married 171. Catherine Allard.

171. Catherine Allard, born Bef. January 20, 1757 in St Michel, PQ.

More About Gabriel Danis:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

More About Catherine Allard:
Fact 1: MF pgs 620-621

Child of Gabriel Danis and Catherine Allard is:

85 i. Marie Louis Danis, married Jacques Lambert November 06, 1775 in St Michel, Yamaska, PQ.

Generation No. 9

256. Unknown McKay, born in Scotland.

More About Unknown McKay:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

Children of Unknown McKay are:

136 i. John McNab McKay, born 1731 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT; died Abt. 1791 in Albany Factory, Rupert's Land; married Unknown.

128 ii. Donald William McKay, born 1733 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT; died in Fort Albany area.

272. Unknown McKay, born in Scotland.

More About Unknown McKay:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

Children of Unknown McKay are:

136 i. John McNab McKay, born 1731 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT; died Abt. 1791 in Albany Factory, Rupert's Land; married Unknown.

128 ii. Donald William McKay, born 1733 in Brora, Sutherlandshire, SCT; died in Fort Albany area.

276. John Sr. Favell, born 1697 in Clerenwell, London, Englan. He was the son of 552. Edward Favell and 553. Mary Unknown. He married 277. Jane Unknown.

277. Jane Unknown.

Notes for John Sr. Favell:
Info from Hudson's Bay Company Archives, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Their source A16/4 fo.8; Somerset House, Will, Prob ll/ll35, Ducarel, 551

More About John Sr. Favell:
Date born 2: 1697, Southwark, England
Christening: December 20, 1697, St James, Clerkenwell, London, England

More About Jane Unknown:
Fact 1: Eileen Horan Research <ileanonu@home.com> Nov 12, 2000

Child of John Favell and Jane Unknown is:

138 i. John Humphrey (Jr) Favell, born Abt. 1740 in Southwark, London, England; died November 02, 1784 in Henley House, Albany District, Rupert's Land; married Titameg Abt. 1770 in Rupert's Land = NWT = MB, CAN.

320. Samuel Fidler, born November 01, 1700 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. He was the son of 640. Jesper Fidler and 641. Elizabeth Ludlam. He married 321. Sarah Oldfield April 07, 1727 in Sutton-cum, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England.

321. Sarah Oldfield, born January 18, 1702 in Bolsover, Derbyshire, England.

More About Samuel Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001
Fact 2: Ancestry.com <Happyharry@sk.sympatico.ca>

Notes for Sarah Oldfield:

Source; IGI, Mary Fidler Bolsover. Source for death and burial, Memorial Inscriptions as recorded on micro fiche by the Derbyshire Family History

Society. The inscription reads "- - - who departed this life Dec ye 1 0 A D 17 --, aged -8 years- - -".

More About Sarah Oldfield:
Burial: St Mary's, Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001 see notes
Fact 2: Ancestry.com <Happyharry@sk.sympatico.ca>

Children of Samuel Fidler and Sarah Oldfield are:

i. Thomas Fidler, born Bef. November 13, 1727.

More About Thomas Fidler:
Christening: November 13, 1727, Parish Church, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Source: Will of Jesper Fidler #68, IGI, Mary Fidler, Bolsover.

ii. Benjamin Fidler, born Bet. 1727 - 1740.

More About Benjamin Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

iii. Francis Fidler, born Bef. April 03, 1729.

More About Francis Fidler:
Christening: April 03, 1729, Parish Church, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Source: Will of Jesper Fidler #68, IGI, Mary Fidler, Bolsover.

iv. John James Fidler, born Bef. October 19, 1731.

More About John James Fidler:
Christening: October 19, 1731, Parish Church, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Source: Will of Jesper Fidler #68, IGI, Mary Fidler, Bolsover.

v. Elizabeth Fidler, born Bef. February 12, 1732; died November 29, 1783 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England; married John Lingard April 19, 1756 in Parish Church, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England.

Notes for Elizabeth Fidler:
Source; Will of Jasper Fidler #68, IGI, Mary Fidler. Source for death and burial, Memorial Inscriptions as recorded on micro fiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society. Age at death given as 78 years.

More About Elizabeth Fidler:
Burial: All Saints, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Christening: February 12, 1732, All Saints, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Notes for John Lingard:
Source; Will of Jasper Fidler #68, IGI. Source for death and burial , Memorial Inscriptins as recorded on micro fiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society. Age at death given as 73 years.

More About John Lingard:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002, see notes

160 vi. James Fidler, born 1734 in Duckmanton, Derby, England; died May 16, 1809 in Sutton, Scarsdale, Derby, England; married Mary Glossup May 13, 1768 in Duckmanton, Derby, England.

vii. Jasper Fidler, born Bef. December 28, 1740.

More About Jasper Fidler:
Christening: December 28, 1740, Parish Church, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Source: Will of Jesper Fidler #68, IGI, Mary Fidler, Bolsover.

322. Peter Glossup, born in England?. He married 323. Sarah Heath.

323. Sarah Heath, born in England?.

More About Peter Glossup:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

More About Sarah Heath:
Fact 1: Stan Hulme Research

Child of Peter Glossup and Sarah Heath is:

161 i. Mary Glossup, born March 25, 1747 in Duckmanton, Derby, England; died Abt. 1827 in Bolsover, Derby, England; married James Fidler May 13, 1768 in Duckmanton, Derby, England.

Generation No. 10

552. Edward Favell, born 1660 in England. He married 553. Mary Unknown.

553. Mary Unknown.

More About Edward Favell:
Fact 1: Source John Hunter

More About Mary Unknown:
Fact 1: Judy Parisian <parisian@sk.sympatico.ca> Feb 5, 2001

Child of Edward Favell and Mary Unknown is:

276 i. John Sr. Favell, born 1697 in Clerenwell, London, Englan; married Jane Unknown.

640. Jesper Fidler, born Bef. February 27, 1667 in Wingerworth, England. He was the son of 1280. John Fidler and 1281. Unknown. He married 641. Elizabeth Ludlam September 05, 1699 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England.

641. Elizabeth Ludlam, born Bef. March 26, 1689 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England; died Bef. September 18, 1716 in England.

More About Jesper Fidler:
Fact 1: shown as Jesper Fidler by Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001
Fact 2: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 3: Shown as Jasper Fidler by Ancestry.com <Happyharry@sk.sympatico.ca>
Fact 4: after Elizabeth died, he married another Elizabeth.

More About Elizabeth Ludlam:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Elizabeth Brough:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Children of Jesper Fidler and Elizabeth Ludlam are:

i. Thomas Fidler, born Bet. 1700 - 1715.

More About Thomas Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

320 ii. Samuel Fidler, born November 01, 1700 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England; married Sarah Oldfield April 07, 1727 in Sutton-cum, Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England.

iii. John Fidler, born Bef. April 07, 1702; married Mary Hollingworth July 21, 1760 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England.

More About John Fidler:
Christening: April 07, 1702, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About Mary Hollingworth:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

iv. Jasper Fidler, born Bef. December 28, 1703.

More About Jasper Fidler:
Christening: December 28, 1703, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

v. Jacob Fidler, born Bef. January 15, 1707; married Elizabeth Oldfield April 11, 1727 in Ault Hucknall, Derbyshire, England.

More About Jacob Fidler:
Christening: January 15, 1707, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About Elizabeth Oldfield:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

vi. Joseph Fidler, born Bef. February 08, 1708.

More About Joseph Fidler:
Christening: February 08, 1708
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

vii. Elizabeth Fidler, born Bef. January 23, 1710; died October 01, 1791; married Robert Oldfield September 04, 1733 in South Wingfield, Derbyshire, England.

More About Elizabeth Fidler:
Burial: St Mary's, Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England
Christening: January 23, 1710, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Source for death and burial: Memorial Inscriptions as recorded on microfiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society. Age at death given as 81 years.

More About Robert Oldfield:
Burial: St Mary's, Sutton Scarsdale, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

viii. Benjamin Fidler, born Bef. May 18, 1714.

More About Benjamin Fidler:
Christening: May 18, 1714, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

ix. Dorothy Fidler, born Bef. April 04, 1716; married Samuel Barker April 25, 1741 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.

More About Dorothy Fidler:
Christening: April 04, 1716, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About Samuel Barker:
Christening: December 25, 1715, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

x. Mary Fidler, born Bet. 1700 - 1720.

More About Mary Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Children of Jesper Fidler and Elizabeth Brough are:

i. Anne Fidler, born Bef. January 24, 1726.

More About Anne Fidler:
Christening: January 24, 1726, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England

Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

ii. John Fidler, born Bef. July 01, 1717; died Bef. October 25, 1726.

More About John Fidler:
Burial: October 25, 1726, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Christening: July 01, 1717, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

iii. James Fidler, born Bef. January 01, 1718; died May 17, 1786 in Walton, Derbyshire, England; married Mary Warsdale February 09, 1752 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.

More About James Fidler:
Burial: All Saints, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Christening: January 01, 1718, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

More About Mary Warsdale:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

iv. Jesper Fidler, born Bef. February 14, 1719.

More About Jesper Fidler:
Christening: February 14, 1719, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

v. Thomas Fidler, born Bef. March 12, 1723; died Bet. August 07, 1792 - April 24, 1793.

More About Thomas Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002
Fact 2: Thomas died between the time of making his will on 12 Mar 1723 and the probating of his will on 07 Aug 1792

vi. George Fidler, born Bef. December 18, 1717 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.

More About George Fidler:
Christening: December 18, 1717, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Generation No. 11

1280. John Fidler, born Bet. 1634 - 1644 in England; died Unknown. He married 1281. Unknown.

1281. Unknown, born Bet. 1634 - 1644 in England; died Unknown.

More About John Fidler:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Unknown:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

Children of John Fidler and Unknown are:

i. John Sr Fidler, born Abt. December 11, 1664 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England; died Abt. November 1709; married Dorothy Unknown.

More About John Sr Fidler:
Burial: November 24, 1709, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Christening: December 11, 1664, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

More About Dorothy Unknown:
Fact 1: Peggy Zaraska <pzfidler@altavista.com> June 7, 2001

640 ii. Jesper Fidler, born Bef. February 27, 1667 in Wingerworth, England; married (1) Elizabeth Ludlam September 05, 1699 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England; married (2) Elizabeth Brough September 18, 1716 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England.

iii. Dorythie Fidler, born Bef. June 16, 1667.

More About Dorythie Fidler:
Christening: June 16, 1667, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002

iv. Jasper Fidler, born January 28, 1670 in Wingerworth, Derbyshire, England.

More About Jasper Fidler:
Fact 1: Louis "Little Fidler" Verhagen Database 06 Jan 2002


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