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The Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library Family Tree
Mo Hawg - Week 20


Day 1.

   According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids (or piglets) in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and even 1960s, 1970s and the early 1980s should not have survived! For those who have come along since then, Mo presents: "I Can't Believe We Made It" for Today: As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags.  Riding in the back of a pickup truck on a warm day was always a special treat.  We survived.

   Things Mo Has Learned As He Has Matured: I've learned that one good turn gets most of the blankets.

   Mo's good friend, Steve Kelly, from Tennessee sent these for us all to enjoy.  We'll call them our "Out of the Mouths of Babes" Answers for Today:  In reply to the question, "Is anything about your mom perfect?" answers from the little ones in the Sunday School Kindergarten class included: "Her teeth are perfect, but she bought them from the dentist."  "Her casserole recipes.but we hate them."  "Just her children."

Day 2.
  
      Mo's good friend, Buck Buchanan from Vacaville, California - a decorated World War II   Flying Ace and hero - sent along his personal rules and truths about healthy eating.  Mo is glad to share Buck's insight and knowledge with you!  Finally, a diet and lifestyle Mo can do!
   Buck's Healthy Eating Truths: (Mo knows that these are for fun! Please do not take these to your doctor and ask him if you can adopt this way of life and eating!)  
   Bubba wrote and asked, "Mo & Buck, what are some of the advantages of participating in a regular exercise program?"
   After consultation with Buck, the answer is, "We can't think of a single one, sorry.  Our philosophy is: No Pain.Good!"  

   Things Mo Has Learned As He Has Matured: I've learned that it takes years to build up trust and it only takes suspicion, not proof, to destroy it.

Day 3.

   According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids (or piglets) in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and even 1960s, 1970s and the early 1980s should not have survived! For those who have come along since then, Mo presents: "I Can't Believe We Made It" for Today: We played dodge ball.  Sometimes the ball would really hurt.  We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.  They were accidents and no one was to blame.  We survived.

   Things Mo Has Learned As He Has Matured: I've learned that whatever hits the fan will not be evenly distributed.

   Mo's good friend, Steve Kelly, from Tennessee sent these for us all to enjoy.  We'll call them our "Out of the Mouths of Babes" Answers for Today:  In reply to the question, "If you could change one thing about your mom, what would it be?" answers from the little ones in the Sunday School Kindergarten class included: "She has this weird thing about me keeping my room clean.  I'd get rid of that!"-

Day 4.

      In Japan, they have replaced the impersonal and unhelpful computer error message with Haiku poetry message.  Mo knows about Haiku.  (It has strict construction rules with only 17 syllables allowed in each poem; 5 syllables in the first line, 7 syllables in the second line and 5 in the third line.) 
   Mo presents actual error messages from Japan: "Yesterday it worked.  Today it is not working.  Windows is like that."

   Things Mo Has Learned As He Has Matured: I've learned that depression is merely anger without enthusiasm.

    Mo's friend, Al Eaton from Orlando, Florida, sent along some wisdom for Mo's readers who might be thinking about getting a dog.  Al writes, " Rule No. 1. Dogs are never permitted in the house. The dog stays outside in a specially built wooden compartment named, the dog house."
   "Rule No. 2.  Okay, the dog can enter the house, but only for short visits or if his own house is under renovation."

Day 5.

   Things Mo Has Learned As He Has Matured: I've learned not to sweat the petty things and not pet the sweaty things.

   Mo's friend, Al Eaton from Orlando, Florida, sent along some wisdom for Mo's readers who might be thinking about getting a dog.  Al writes, "Rule No. 3.  Okay, the dog can stay in the house on a permanent basis, provided his dog house can be sold in a yard sale to a rookie dog owner."
   "Rule No. 4.  Inside the house, the dog is not allowed to run free and is confined to a comfortable, but secure, metal cage."
   "Rule No. 5.  Okay, the cage becomes part of a two-for-one deal along with the dog house in the yard sale and the dog can go wherever he pleases."

   Every once in awhile over the next few weeks, Mo is going to have a little quiz for those of you who grew up in the 1940s and thereabouts!  It's fun!
   In the 1940s, where were automobile headlight dimmer switches located?
   Were they: On the floor shift knob?  On the floor board, to the left of the clutch?  Next to the horn?
   Give up?  The dimmer switch was really on the floor, to the left of the clutch.  It took until the late 1960s for the European hand controls to catch on in the US.


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