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Home and Farm Food Preservation
Food Preservation Recipes
Chapter XX - Canning Vegetables


The general principles of vegetable canning will be found in Part II, Chap. IV. The following recipes consist of working directions only; it is therefore advised that Chap. IV be read before the actual canning be undertaken.

(20) Canning of Artichokes.

Use only young, tender artichokes.

1. Trim off hard tips. and stems and outer leaves, leaving only the tender parts.

2. Parboil or blanch in boiling water for 5 to 10 min. This is best done by placing the vegetables in a wire basket or cheesecloth and immersing in the boiling water. Chill slightly in cold water. Pack into jars or cans whole if possible. Cut to fit can if necessary.

3. Fill with boiling hot brine of 3 ounces of salt per gallon and 4 fluid ounces (1/4 pint), of lemon juice or very strong vinegar per gallon. A measuring cup or tablespoon may be used to measure the lemon juice. Two tablespoons equal one ounce of liquid.

4. Sterilize cans, after sealing, one hour in boiling water and jars one and one-half hours. If the jar rubbers swell and become loose, they may be placed on the jars after an hour's sterilization; this subjects them to only a half hour's sterilization.

5. Pressure Method. Lemon juice may be omitted in the above formula, but if this is done the vegetables must be sterilized in sealed cans in a steam pressure sterilizer at ten pounds' pressure for 20 min. See par. 21, Chap. IV. Do not attempt to use jars in a steam pressure sterilizer. The breakage will be too great.

6. Three-Day Method. In this method omit the lemon juice but sterilize one hour on each of three successive days in boiling water. (See par. 21, Chap. IV.)

7. One-Day Method at 212° F. If the lemon juice and vinegar are omitted, sterilize cans for 4 hours at 212° F. and jars 434 hours. (See par. 24, Chap. IV.)

(21) Canning of Asparagus.

1. Use tender tips freshly cut from the garden or field. Freshness is essential.

2. Wash. Grade into three sizes. Cut to length of jar or can.

3. Parboil or blanch in boiling water 2 to 10 min. depending on size of stalks. (See Recipe 1.)

4. Chill in cold water. Scrape skin from very large stalks.

5. Pack into cans or jars neatly with blossom ends up. Square cans are most commonly used.

6. Fill with boiling hot brine of 3 ounces salt (3 tablespoonfuls), and 5 ounces (10 tablespoonfuls), lemon juice or strong vinegar per gallon of water.

7. Seal cans. Place scalded rubbers and caps loosely on jars.

8. Sterilize cans in boiling water one hour and jars one and one-half hours.

9. Pressure Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar. Sterilize in cans 20 min. at ten pounds pressure 240° F. Do not use jars in this method.

10. Three-Day Method. Sterilize in boiling water one hour on each of three successive days. (See par. 24, Chap. IV.) Do not use lemon juice or vinegar.

11. One-Day Method at 212° F. If the lemon juice and vinegar are omitted from above brine and steam pressure is not used the asparagus may be sterilized by heating cans or jars in boiling water for 5 hours. Less time than this may result in fatal poisoning.

(22) Canning of Green String Beans and Wax Beans.

1. Use small tender pods only for the best results. Grade into two sizes. The smaller grade will be most tender.

2. String and break or cut into pieces as for table use. Large pods are greatly improved by cutting into thin pieces lengthwise.

3. Parboil or blanch in boiling water; the small tender pods 3 min. and larger, tougher pods 6 min. or longer. Par boiling is easily done by placing the beans in a cheesecloth bag and immersing in boiling water. Chill momentarily in cold water. (See par. 17, Chap. IV.)

4. Pack into cans or jars. Add a boiling hot brine of 2 oz. (2 tablespoonfuls), salt and 4 fluid oz. (8 tablespoonfuls), lemon juice per gallon of water. Seal cans. Place caps and rubbers on jars loosely.

5. Sterilize cans 1 1/2 hours in boiling water; jars 2 hours at the same temperature. (See par. 21, Chap. IV.) Remove jars and seal.

6. Pressure Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar in above formula. Sterilize in cans, only 30 min. under 10 lb. steam pressure, 240º F.

7. Three-Day Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar from brine. Sterilize in boiling water 1 hour on each of three successive days. (See par. 21, Chap. IV.)

(23) Canning of Beets.

1. Use small red beets of good color. Turnip shaped beets are preferred. Wash, cut off tops and roots.

2. Parboil until the skins will slip easily. This will be 10 to 15 min. boiling.

3. Chill in cold water and peel.

4. Pack into jars or cans. Add a boiling hot brine of 3 oz. (3 tablespoonfuls) salt and 4 fluid oz. (8 table-spoonfuls), lemon juice or strong vinegar per gal. Seal cans and place caps on jars loosely.

5. Sterilize cans 1 hour in boiling water and jars 1 1/2 hours.

6. Pressure Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar in above recipe. Sterilize cans 30 min. at 10 lbs. pressure, 240º F.

7. Three-Day Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar. Sterilize 1 hour in boiling water on each of three successive days.

8. One-Day Method at 212° F. If the lemon juice or vinegar are omitted from the brine, sterilize cans 4 1/2 hours and jars 5 hours at 212º for one day only.

(24) Canning of Carrots, Turnips, Parsnips and Orions.

1. Peel and cut in pieces as for table use.

2. Place in cans or jars. Add a hot brine of 4 fluid oz. of lemon juice or strong vinegar (8 tablespoonfuls), and 3 oz. by weight (3 tablespoonfuls), salt per gallon of water. Seal cans. Leave caps and rubbers on jars loosely.

3. Sterilize cans 1 1/2 hours in boiling water and jars 2 hours.

4. Pressure Method. As for beets (See Recipe 23, 6.)

5. Three-Day Method. As for beets. (See Recipe 23, 7.)

6. One-Day Method at 212° F. If lemon juice or vinegar are omitted from brine, follow one-day method as for beets. (See Recipe 23, 8.)

(25) Canning of Corn.

1. Use sweet corn at the best stage of ripeness for table use. Can immediately after gathering from garden or field. Remove husks and silk. Blanch in boiling water 10 min. and chill.

2. Cut the corn from the cob avoiding the hard husks of kernels near cob; that is, do not cut too close to the cob. Scrape cobs.

3. Prepare a brine of 1/2 lb. sugar, 3 oz. (3 tablespoonfuls) salt and 6 fluid oz. (12 tablespoonfuls), lemon juice or strong vinegar per gallon of water.

4. Place the corn in a pot and add enough of the brine to practically cover the corn. Heat to boiling. Boil about 5 min. Transfer while boiling hot to cans or jars. Seal, cans and place caps and rubbers on jars loosely.

5. Sterilize cans 2 hours and jars 2 1/2 hours in boiling water by wash boiler or similar sterilizer.

6. Pressure Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar from the above recipe. Sterilize in cans for 50 min. under 15 lbs. pressure, 250º F. No. 2 cans are usually employed for corn. Do not use glass jars in the pressure method for corn.

7. Three-Day Method. Omit the lemon juice and vinegar from the above recipe. Sterilize cans or jars for 1 1/2 hours at 212° on each of three successive days. Corn is hard to sterilize because the heat penetrates slowly and because the corn is lacking in acid and contains spore-bearing, heat-resistant bacteria.

8. One-Day Method at 212° F. If the lemon juice and vinegar are omitted from brine, sterilize both cans and jars 6 hours at 212° F.

(26) Canning of Green Peas.

Peas are harvested, shelled, cleaned, and graded commercially by machinery. If all of these operations are carried out by hand the product becomes too expensive for marketing purposes. Enough for canning for home use may be shelled by hand.

1. Select tender peas. Shell.

2. Place in a cheesecloth bag or wire basket and parboil or blanch in boiling water 1 to 5 min. depending on the size and texture. Chill in cold water.

3. Pack into jars or cans.

4. Fill with a boiling hot brine of 2 oz. of salt (2 tablespoonfuls), and 5 fluid oz. (10 tablespoonfuls), lemon juice or strong vinegar per gallon of water. Seal cans. Place caps and rubbers on jars loosely.

5. Sterilize cans 1 1/2 hours and jars 2 hours at 212° F. In cooking peas canned in this way after opening the can add a little baking soda to remove the lemon flavor.

6. Pressure Method. As for beets. (See Recipe 23, 6.)

7. Three-Day Method. As for beets. (See Recipe 23, 7.)

8. One-Day Method at 212° without Lemon Juice or Vinegar. Sterilize cans at 212° F. 5 1/2 hours and jars 6 hours if lemon juice or vinegar are omitted from brine.

(27) Canning of Pimentos and Sweet Peppers.

1. Select ripe, well colored pimentos or sweet peppers. To peel them place them in a very hot oven for a short time, until the skins may be easily slipped from the pimentos with the fingers. They may also be peeled by dipping them in very hot cotton seed oil for a short time.

2. Allow to cool. Remove skins and cut out stems and seed cores.

3. The heating will have softened them. Pack well in cans or jars. Fill with boiling hot water. Seal cans. Place rubbers and caps loosely on jars.

4. Sterilize cans 40 min. and jars 60 min. at 212° F. in a washboiler sterilizer. Pressure sterilization and lemon juice are not necessary.

(28) Canning of Pumpkin and Squash.

1. Cut in half and remove pulp and seeds. Cut in strips and cut off outer rind. Cut flesh in pieces that will go into cans or jars conveniently.

2. Pack into jars or cans. Add a boiling hot brine of 2 oz. of salt (2 tablespoonfuls), and 4 fluid oz. lemon juice (8 tablespoonfuls), per gallon. Seal cans; place lids and rubbers on jars loosely.

3. Sterilize cans 1 hour and jars 1 1/2 hours at 212° F. In using pumpkin canned in this way it will be advisable to add a little baking soda to remove the acid taste after can is opened for use.

4. Pressure Method. Remove pulp and outer rind. Cook till soft. Pass through screen or grinder. Heat pulp almost to boiling. Pack into cans hot and seal. Sterilize 1 hour at 10 lbs. steam pressure. Do not use jars.

5. Three-Day Method. Prepare and can as in (4) but sterilize cans 1 1/2 hours and jars 2 hours on each of three successive days.

(29) Canning of Spinach and Other Greens.

1. Greens for canning should be fresh. Trim as for cooking for table use.

2. Place in wire basket or cheese cloth and immerse in boiling water for 10 min. Chill in cold water.

3. Pack in jars or cans.

4. Fill with boiling hot brine of 2 oz. salt (2 tablespoonfuls) and 6 oz. (12 tablespoonfuls) lemon juice per gallon of water. Seal cans. Place caps and rubbers on jars loosely.

5. Sterilize cans in boiling water 60 min. and jars 80 min.

6. Pressure Method. As for beets. (See Recipe 23, 6.)

7. Three-Day Method. As for beets. (See Recipe 23,7.)

8. One-Day Method at 212° F. Sterilize cans 4 hours and jars 4 1/2 hours at 212° F. if lemon juice and vinegar are omitted from brine.

(30) Canning of Tomatoes.

Tomatoes for canning should be smooth skinned and of good color.

1. To peel the tomatoes, place them in a wire basket or cheesecloth and immerse in boiling water long enough to crack and loosen the skins. This will be 1/2 to 1 min.

2. Chill in cold water and peel. Cut out cores. The juice from the cores may be added in canning.

3. Heat to boiling and pack hot in cans or jars. Seal cans. Place caps and rubbers on jars loosely.

4. Sterilize No. 3 cans in boiling water 40 min. and No. 10 cans 75 min.; jars 60 min. Tomatoes canned without the addition of tomato juice are known as "solid pack"; if juice is added, "standard pack."

5. Canning Whole Tomatoes for Use in Salads. Peel as in "1." Do not remove cores. Pack carefully whole in wide mouthed cans or jars. Prepare tomato juice by pressing cooked tomatoes through a cheesecloth. Heat juice to boiling. Pour boiling hot on the tomatoes in the cans or jars. Seal cans. Sterilize 5 min, in boiling water counting time from time the water boils.

6. Canning Tomato Purée. Tomato purée is the pulp of the tomato minus skins and seeds. Peel as in "1." Boil in pot till soft. Pass through fine screen to remove seeds. Heat to boiling. Fill into jars or cans. Seal cans. Space is saved if the purée is boiled down to one- half its volume before canning. Sterilize No. 3 cans or smaller cans at 212° for 80 min. and jars 1 1/2 hours, and No. 10 cans 1 1/4 hours. Purée is useful for soups, etc. Commercially, tomato purée is made in enormous quantities for ketchup manufacture. A special machine known as the "cyclone" removes skins and seeds and makes a coarse pulp. The pulp is passed through a finisher to break it up more finely before boiling down and canning.

(31) Canning of Sweet Potatoes.

Sweet potatoes are best sterilized without pressure. The cans must be well filled or oxidation and darkening of color will result.

1. Use freshly dug potatoes.

2. Boil in water until the skin will slip easily from the potato, usually 15 to 20 min. Peel while still as hot as possible. Gloves may be worn to protect the hands.

3. Pack tightly into cans or jars pressing the potatoes down to make the container as full as possible. Seal cans. Place caps and rubbers on jars loosely. The best grade of rubbers must be used.

4. Sterilize No. 2 and No. 3 cans 4 hours in boiling water and jars 5 hours. Pressure sterilization results in darkening and the lemon juice method is not suitable.

(32) Canning of Dried Beans.

1. Beans Boston Style. Soak the beans overnight in water. Discard the water. Place the beans in a screen basket or mosquito netting bag and steam in a covered washboiler or steam pressure retort for 1 1/2 hours. Prepare a sauce as follows: Boil together 2 gals. water; 5 oz. (10 tablespoonfuls) salt; 1 pint best molasses; 2 lbs. sugar; allow to cool to about 160º F. and add 1/4 lb. of butter; 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon; 3/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper and 1 1/2 gals. of tomato purée (tomato pulp). Pack the hot steamed beans into cans filling cans about 3' inch from top. Heat the sauce prepared as above to boiling and fill the cans. Seal. Sterilize 13 hours at 15 lbs. steam pressure or 250° F. They may also be sterilized by heating to 212° F. for 1 1/2 hours on each of three successive days.

2. Beans with Pork. Proceed as in "1" but when beans are filled into cans add a few strips of salt pork to each can. Sterilize as in "1."

(33) Canning of Hominy. [From "National Canning Recipes," page 26.]

1. Preparation. Dissolve 2 oz. soda lye (2 tablespoonfuls, level), in each gallon of water in an agateware pot. Place white dry corn in this and boil hard for 1 hour. Place the corn in a wire basket or mosquito netting bag and allow cold water to run through it for 5 or 6 hours. If this cannot be done, place in a large tub of water and change the water often and stir frequently for 6 or 8 hours. This is to remove the lye. Place the corn in a hulling machine to remove the hulls and black eyes. This machine may be made by running a shaft through a barrel lengthwise. Place the ends of the shaft on a horizontal support so that the barrel may be revolved.

A barrel churn may also be used for this. After hulls and eyes are removed, place the hulled corn back in the agateware kettle with water and cook until tender. Place on coarse screen and wash out remaining hulls and eyes with water.

2. Sterilizing. Fill into cans. Add a boiling hot brine of 2 oz. (2 tablespoonfuls), of salt per gallon of water. Cap and seal. Sterilize cans 45 min. at 15 lbs. steam pressure, 250º F. or 1 1/4 hours on each of three successive days at 212° F. Jars may be used if sterilized 1/ hours on each of three successive days at 212° F.

(34) Canning of Egg Plant.

1. Peel and cut in slices. Drop in boiling water for 10 to 15 min.

2. Pack hot in cans or jars. Cover with boiling water. Seal cans. Place scalded caps and rubbers on jars without screwing them down.

3. Pressure Sterilization. Sterilize cans 60 min. at 10 lbs. pressure, 240° F.

4. Three-Day Method. Sterilize jars or cans 1 hour on each of three successive days at 212°F.

5. One-Day Method at 212°. Sterilize at 212° F. for 32 hours in jars or cans for one cooking only.

(35) Canning of Okra.

1. Wash the okra in cold water. Parboil 15 min. in boiling water.

2. Cut off and discard stem end. Cut in slices crosswise. Pack in cans or jars.

3. Fill cans or jars with hot brine, consisting of 2 oz. (2 tablespoonfuls), of salt and 4 oz. of lemon juice or strong vinegar per gallon of water. Seal cans. Leave lids and rubbers loose on jars.

4. Sterilize cans 1 hour at 212° F. and jars 1 1/2 hours. Count time after water boils.

5. Pressure Sterilization. Omit lemon juice and vinegar from above brine. Sterilize in cans 30 min. at 10 lbs. pressure 240° F.

6. Three-Day Method. Omit lemon juice and vinegar. Sterilize 1 hour on each of three successive days at 212° F.

7. One-Day Method at 212° F. Omit lemon juice and vinegar. Sterilize cans 2 hours and jars 3 1/2 hours at 212° F.


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