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History of England and Scottish Connections


While this site is all about Scotland clearly there has been a great deal of interaction with England over the centuries. This section is simply to explore some of the history of England and the English to help build an understanding of that country and its interaction with Scotland. Also during the publishing of "Early Scotland" there were a lot of references to the Saxon Chronicles so I thought I'd include this publication here for additional reference. I will from time to time add the odd biography of Scots who were born in England of Scottish parents by way of showing how influential they were. In fact in the period 1790-1820 a staggering 130 Scots were MPs representing seats in England and Wales. I hope by lifting the veil in this way it will encourage others to do more research and obviously we'd be more than happy to publish anything you produce on the subject.

Note: I got clarification on the claim for 130 Scots MP's...

Dear Alastair

I now understand. The figure comes from p. 328 of R. Thorne The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1790-1820 , volume 1, and can be found on this page of the website: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1790-1820/survey/iii-members

Since the page is rather long, I’ve attached the text below.

The author will simply have been through all of the Members covered in our volumes for 1790-1820 and counted up the Scottish ones.

Best wishes

Paul

Scotsmen sitting for non-Scottish seats numbered over 130, noticeably more than the Irish. With 45 seats in Scotland almost monopolized by themselves, the Scots still needed more scope. The eldest sons of Scottish peers, who were not eligible to be created peers of Great Britain until 1782, could not sit for seats in Scotland, and they are among the number. In addition, some Scottish peerage families had English or Welsh interests—notably the Butes. Apart from them, the Campbells, created Lords Cawdor, had Welsh interests. The Johnstone family interest at Weymouth brought in Scots Members; the Dundas interest in Yorkshire introduced members of the family. But, by and large, far more Scots than Irish might properly be termed adventurers: their own country could not support them. Many of them were nabobs—John Agnew, John Alexander Bannerman, Sir George Dallas, Philip Dundas, John Fleming, Charles Forbes, Joseph Hume, Sir John Macpherson, James Paull, Sir William Paxton, John and William Petrie, Patrick Ross, George Simson, James Charles Stuart Strange and Henry Trail come to mind. This was no coincidence: the East India patronage bestowed on his countrymen by Henry Dundas was at work. Apart from dominating Scottish elections, he also occasionally returned Scots for vacant English seats in which he was able to exert ministerial influence, and Scottish Whigs were more or less driven out of their country by him to look for seats elsewhere. Only 23 of all these Members ever sat for Scottish constituencies: the rest crept into every corner of the land for their seats. They were more likely than the Irish to be of mercantile background—London Scottish merchants were often ambitious of a seat in Parliament.


 

The History of England from the
Accession of James II

By Thomas Babington MacAulay

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

An Outline of the Relations between England and Scotland (500-1707)

The New Britons: Scottish Identity in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Commercial Relations of England and Scotland 1603 - 1707 By Theodora Keith (1910)

The Scot in England
By John Herries McCulloch (1935)

Scots Descendants in England

John MacKintosh
A Biography by Geo. W. Crutchley (1921)
Gladstone, W.E.
Prime Minister of Britain, by James Bryce (1919)


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